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The Mechanical and Thermal Design for the MICE Focusing SolenoidMagnet System

Description: The focusing solenoids for MICE surround energy absorbers that are used to reduce the transverse momentum of the muon beam that is being cooled within MICE. The focusing solenoids will have a warm-bore diameter of 470 mm. Within this bore is a flask of liquid hydrogen or a room temperature beryllium absorber. The focusing solenoid consists of two coils wound with a copper matrix Nb-Ti conductor originally designed for MRI magnets. The two coils have separate leads, so that they may be operated at the same polarity or at opposite polarity. The focusing magnet is designed so that it can be cooled with a pair of 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) coolers. The MICE cooling channel has three focusing magnets with their absorbers. The three focusing magnets will be hooked together in series for a circuit stored-energy of about 9.0 MJ. Quench protection for the focusing magnets is discussed. This report presents the mechanical and thermal design parameters for this magnet, including the results of finite element calculations of mechanical forces and heat flow in the magnet cold mass.
Date: May 7, 2004
Creator: Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Bravar, U.; Cobb, J.; Lau, W. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Mice Focusing Solenoids and their Cooling System

Description: This report describes the focusing solenoid for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1]. The focusing solenoid consists of a pair of superconducting solenoids that are on a common bobbin. The two coils, which have separate leads, may be operated in the same polarity or at opposite polarity. This report discusses the superconducting magnet design and the cryostat design for the MICE focusing module. Also discussed is how this superconducting magnet can be integrated with a pair of small 4.2 K coolers.
Date: May 7, 2004
Creator: Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S. & Yang, S.Q.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling Free Convection Flow of Liquid Hydrogen within a Cylindrical Heat Exchanger Cooled to 14 K

Description: A liquid hydrogen in a absorber for muon cooling requires that up to 300 W be removed from 20 liters of liquid hydrogen. The wall of the container is a heat exchanger between the hydrogen and 14 K helium gas in channels within the wall. The warm liquid hydrogen is circulated down the cylindrical walls of the absorber by free convection. The flow of the hydrogen is studied using FEA methods for two cases and the heat transfer coefficient to the wall is calculated. The first case is when the wall is bare. The second case is when there is a duct some distance inside the cooled wall.
Date: May 8, 2004
Creator: Green, Michael A.; U., Oxford; Yang, S.W.; Green, M.A. & Lau, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the Coupling Coil for the MICE Channel

Description: This report describes the progress on the coupling magnet for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channel that is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrino factory. The MICE RF coupling coil module (RFCC module) consists of a 1.56 m diameter superconducting solenoid, mounted around four cells of conventional 201.25 MHz closed RF cavities. This report discusses the progress that has been made on the superconducting coupling coil that is around the center of the RF coupling module. This report describes the process by which one would cool the coupling coil using a single small 4 K cooler. In addition, the coupling magnet power system and quench protection system are also described.
Date: May 8, 2005
Creator: Green, M.A.; Li, D.; Virostek, S.P.; Lau, W.; Witte, H.; Yang,S.Q. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the Focus Coil for the MICE Channel

Description: This report describes the progress on the magnet part of the absorber focus coil module for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channel that is similar to that studied in Feasibility 2 study of a neutrino factory [1]. The MICE absorber focus coil module consists of a pair of superconducting solenoids, mounted on an aluminum mandrel. The coil package is in its own vacuum vessel located around an absorber. The absorber is within a separate vacuum vessel that is within the warm bore of the focusing magnet. The superconducting focus coils may either be run in the solenoid mode (with the two coils at the same polarity) or in the gradient mode (with the coils at opposite polarity, causing the field direction to flip within the magnet bore). The coils will be cooled using a pair of small 4 K coolers. This report discusses the progress on the MICE focusing magnets, the magnet current supply system, and the quench protection system.
Date: May 13, 2005
Creator: Yang, S.Q.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S.; Witte, H.; Green, M.A.; Drumm, P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the MICE Liquid Absorber Cooling and CryogenicDistribution System

Description: This report describes the progress made on the design of the cryogenic cooling system for the liquid absorber for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The absorber consists of a 20.7-liter vessel that contains liquid hydrogen (1.48 kg at 20.3 K) or liquid helium (2.59 kg at 4.2 K). The liquid cryogen vessel is located within the warm bore of the focusing magnet for the MICE. The purpose of the magnet is to provide a low beam beta region within the absorber. For safety reasons, the vacuum vessel for the hydrogen absorber is separated from the vacuum vessel for the superconducting magnet and the vacuum that surrounds the RF cavities or the detector. The absorber thin windows separate the liquid in the absorber from the absorber vacuum. The absorber vacuum vessel also has thin windows that separate the absorber vacuum space from adjacent vacuum spaces. Because the muon beam in MICE is of low intensity, there is no beam heating in the absorber. The absorber can use a single 4 K cooler to cool either liquid helium or liquid hydrogen within the absorber.
Date: May 13, 2005
Creator: Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Bradshaw, T.; Drumm, P.; Ivanyushenkov,Y.; Ishimoto, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the RF Coupling Coil Module Design for the MICEChannel

Description: We describe the progress on the design of the RF coupling coil (RFCC) module for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. The MICE cooling channel design consists of one SFOFO cell that is similar to that of the US Study-II of a neutrino factory. The MICE RFCC module comprises a superconducting solenoid, mounted around four normal conducting 201.25-MHz RF cavities. Each cavity has a pair of thin curved beryllium windows to close the conventional open beam irises, which allows for independent control of the phase in each cavity and for the RF power to be fed separately. The coil package that surrounds the RF cavities is mounted on a vacuum vessel. The RF vacuum is shared between the cavities and the vacuum vessel around the cavities such that there is no differential pressure on the thin beryllium windows. This paper discusses the design progress of the RFCC module and the fabrication progress of a prototype 201.25-MHz cavity.
Date: May 8, 2005
Creator: Li, D.; Green, M.A.; Virostek, S.P.; Zisman, M.S.; Lau, W.; White, A.E. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel

Description: This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Magnet options for sensors for the pulp and paper industry

Description: The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been developing sensors for the pulp and paper industry that uses a magnetic field. The applications for magnetic sensors that have studied include (1) sensors for the measurement of the water and ice content of wood chips entering the pulping mill, (2) sensors for measuring the water content and other constituents of the black liquor leaving the paper digester, and (3) sensors for measuring paper thickness and water content as the paper is being processed. These tasks can be done using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The magnetic field used for doing the NMR can come from either permanent magnets or superconducting magnets. The choice of the magnet is dependent on a number of factors, which include the size of the sample and field strength needed to do the sensing task at hand. This paper describes some superconducting magnet options that can be used in the pulp and paper industry.
Date: May 5, 2001
Creator: Green, M.A.; Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Luft, P.A.; Reimer, J.A. & Yahnke, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The intergration of liquid and solid muon absorbers into afocusing magnet of a muon cooling channel

Description: This report describes how one can integrate the muonabsorber with the focusing coils of a SFOFO muon cooling channel [1]. Theabsorber material must be a low Z material that reduces the muon momentumwith minimum scattering. The best materials to use for muon ionizationcooling absorbers are hydrogen, helium, lithium hydride, lithium, andberyllium. Hydrogen or helium in an absorber would normally be in theliquid state. Lithium hydride, lithium, and beryllium would normally bein the solid state. This report limits the absorber materials discussedto hydrogen, helium, lithium, and beryllium. In order to achieve the samelevel of ionization cooling with a solid absorber as a liquid hydrogenabsorber, the beta of the muon beam must be reduced more than a factor oftwo. This affects both the designs of the absorber and the magnet aroundit. Reducing the beam beta reduces the momentum acceptance of thechannel. Integration of a liquid hydrogen absorber and solid absorberswith a superconducting focusing solenoid is discussed. The choice ofabsorber material affects the design of the superconducting focusingmagnet and the superconductor that is used to generate the magneticfield.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Green, M.A.; Black, E.L.; Cummings, M.A.; Kaplan, D.M.; Ishimoto,S.; Cobb, J.H. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vesselthat is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

Description: This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels.
Date: May 7, 2004
Creator: Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A. & Lau, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Progress on the Fabrication and Testing of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

Description: The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an international collaboration that will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. At each end of the cooling channel a spectrometer solenoid magnet consisting of five superconducting coils will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region. The scintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore will measure the muon beam emittance as it enters and exits the cooling channel. The 400 mm diameter warm bore, 3 meter long magnets incorporate a cold mass consisting of two coil sections wound on a single aluminum mandrel: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil section that matches the solenoid uniform field into the MICE cooling channel. The fabrication of the first of two spectrometer solenoids has been completed, and preliminary testing of the magnet is nearly complete. The key design features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets are presented along with a summary of the progress on the training and testing of the first magnet.
Date: May 19, 2009
Creator: Virostek, Steve; Green, M.A.; Li, Derun & Zisman, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

Description: The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.
Date: May 16, 2010
Creator: Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F. & Zisman, M.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The role of superconductivity and cryogenics in the neutrinofactory

Description: The proposed neutrino factory will produce a defined beam of neutrinos from the decay of muons in a storage ring[1,2,3]. The storage ring will be oriented so that the neutrinos can be detected at one or more detectors several thousand kilometers from the storage ring. This report presents an overview of the proposed neutrino factory and its subsystems that use cryogenics. Superconducting magnets will be used in the following ways in the neutrino factory; (1) the outsert solenoid for the 20 T pion capture system, (2) the decay channel where pions decay to muons, (3) the muon phase rotation system, (4) the muon cooling system, (5) focusing during the first stage of muon acceleration, (6) bending and focusing magnets in the re-circulating linac accelerator and (7) bending and focusing magnets in the muon storage ring where the neutrino beams are generated. Low temperature superconducting RF cavities will be used to accelerate the muons from about 200 MeV to 20 GeV. The muon cooling system uses liquid hydrogen absorbers at 20 K to reduce the emittance of the muon beam before it is accelerated to full energy.
Date: May 6, 2001
Creator: Green, M.A.; Black, E.L.; Gupta, R.C.; Iarocci, M.A.; Lebedev,V.; Miller, J.R. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets

Description: This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.
Date: May 1995
Creator: Garren, A. A.; Cline, D. B.; Kolonko, J. J.; Green, M. A.; Johnson, D. E.; Leung, E. M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superconducting magnets for induction linac phase-rotation in a neutrino factory

Description: The neutrino factory[1-3] consists of a target section where pions are produced and captured in a solenoidal magnetic field. Pions in a range of energies from 100 Mev to 400 MeV decay into muons in an 18-meter long channel of 1.25 T superconducting solenoids. The warm bore diameter of these solenoids is about 600 mm. The phase rotation section slows down the high-energy muon and speeds up the low energy muons to an average momentum of 200 MeV/c. The phase-rotation channel consists of three induction linac channels with a short cooling section and a magnetic flux reversal section between the first and second induction linacs and a drift space between the second and third induction linacs. The length of the phase rotation channel will be about 320 meters. The superconducting coils in the channel are 0.36 m long with a gap of 0.14 m between the coils. The magnetic induction within the channel will be 1.25. For 260 meters of the 320-meter long channel, the solenoids are inside the induction linac. This paper discusses the design parameters for the superconducting solenoids in the neutrino factory phase-rotation channel.
Date: May 9, 2001
Creator: Green, M.A. & Yu, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A recirculating linac-based facility for ultrafast X-ray science

Description: We present an updated design for a proposed source of ultra-fast synchrotron radiation pulses based on a recirculating superconducting linac, in particular the incorporation of EUV and soft x-ray production. The project has been named LUX - Linac-based Ultrafast X-ray facility. The source produces intense x-ray pulses with duration of 10-100 fs at a 10 kHz repetition rate, with synchronization of 10 s fs, optimized for the study of ultra-fast dynamics. The photon range covers the EUV to hard x-ray spectrum by use of seeded harmonic generation in undulators, and a specialized technique for ultra-short-pulse photon production in the 1-10 keV range. High-brightness rf photocathodes produce electron bunches which are optimized either for coherent emission in free-electron lasers, or to provide a large x/y emittance ration and small vertical emittance which allows for manipulation to produce short-pulse hard x-rays. An injector linac accelerates the beam to 120 MeV, and is followed by four passes through a 600-720 MeV recirculating linac. We outline the major technical components of the proposed facility.
Date: May 6, 2003
Creator: Corlett, J.N; Barletta, W.A.; DeSantis, S.; Doolittle, L.; Fawley, W.M.; Green, M.A. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Superconducting solenoids for muon-cooling in the neutrino factory

Description: The cooling channel for a neutrino factory consists of a series of alternating field solenoidal cells. The first section of the bunching cooling channel consists of 41 cells that are 2.75-m long. The second section of the cooling channel consists of 44 cells that are 1.65-m long. Each cell consists of a single large solenoid with an average diameter of 1.5 m and a pair of flux reversal solenoids that have an average diameter of 0.7 to 0.9 meters. The magnetic induction on axis reaches a peak value of about 5 T at the end of the second section of the cooling channel. The peak on axis field gradients in flux reversal section approaches 33 T/m. This report describes the two types of superconducting solenoid magnet sections for the muon-cooling channel of the proposed neutrino factory.
Date: May 12, 2001
Creator: Green, M.A.; Miller, J.R. & Prestemon, S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

An update on passive correctors for the SSC dipole magnets

Description: The concept of correction of the magnetization sextupole became a topic of discussion as soon as it was realized that superconductor magnetization could have a serious effect on the SSC beam during injection. Several methods of correction were proposed. These included (1) correction with active bore tube windings like those on the HERA machine which correct out magnetization sextupole and the sextupole due to iron saturation, (2) correction with persistent sextupole windings mounted on the bore tube (3) correction using passive superconductor (4) correction using ferromagnetic material, and (5) correction using oriented magnetized materials. This report deals with the use of passive superconductor to correct the magnetization sextupole. Two basic methods are explored in this report: (1) One can correct the magnetization sextupole by changing the diameter of the superconductor filaments in one or more blocks of the SSC dipole. (2) One can correct the magnetization sextupole and decapole by mounting passive superconducting wires on the inside of the SSC dipole coil bore. In addition, an assessment of the contribution of each conductor in the dipole to the magnetization sextupole and decapole is shown. 38 refs, 25 figs., 15 tabs.
Date: May 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Correction of magnetization sextupole and decapole in a 5 centimeter bore SSC dipole using passive superconductor

Description: Higher multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor in four and five centimeter bore Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) superconducting dipole magnets have been observed. The use of passive superconductor to correct out the magnetization sextupole has been demonstrated on two dipoles built by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This reports shows how passive correction can be applied to the five centimeter SSC dipoles to remove sextupole and decapole caused by magnetization of the dipole superconductor. Two passive superconductor corrector options will be presented. The change in magnetization sextupole and decapole due to flux creep decay of the superconductor during injection can be partially compensated for using the passive superconductor. 9 refs; 5 figs.
Date: May 1, 1991
Creator: Green, M.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Construction and testing of a double acting bellows liquid helium pump

Description: The double acting reciprocating bellows liquid helium pump built and tested at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. The pump is capable of delivering 50 gs/sup -1/ of liquid helium to supply the two-phase cooling sytem for a large superconducting magnet. The pump is driven by a torque motor at room temperature; the reciprocating motion is transmitted to the pump through a shaft which operates between room temperature and 4/sup 0/K. The design details of this liquid helium pump are presented. The helium pump has operated in a helium bath and in pumped forced flow helium circuits. The results of these experimental tests are presented in this report.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Burns, W.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R. & Van Slyke, H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department