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ESTIMATE OF HAZARD PRODUCED BY ACCIDENTAL RELEASE OF GASEOUS FISSION PRODUCTS FROM AN ORR FUSED SALT CAPSULE EXPERIMENT

Description: An accidental release of gaseous fission products from an ORR fused salt capsule, containing 26 mg. of U/sup 235/, was postulated and the resuiting hazard estimated by calculating the maximum external and internal dose an individual could receive from exposure to the gaseous fission products and their decay products. Assuming all the contained gaseous fission produets are released, the resulting external and internal dosc, to organs other than the thyroid, arc insignificant. The dose to the thyroid by radioiodine is considered to be significant. By retaining at least 90% of the iodine isotopes in the experiment system through use of an iodine trap, a large reduction in both the external whole body and internal thyroid doses may be achieved. Therefore, assuming an iodine trap is utilized, it appears that the consequences of am accidental gaseous fission product release from an ORR fused salt capsule experiment would not be serious. (auth)
Date: April 24, 1959
Creator: Adams, R.E. & Browning, W.E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nuclear medicine program progress report for quarter ending December 31, 1991

Description: This report presents information on (1) a new improved synthesis of carrier-free rhenium-188-labeled Re(V) dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) complex as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of thyroid medullary carcinoma; and (2) the synthesis and evaluation of a series of iodine-125-labeled analogues of altanserine for imaging of serotonin receptors.
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Ambrose, K.R.; Callahan, A.P.; McPherson, D.W.; Mirzadeh, S.; Srivastava, P.C. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Estimated long-term health effects

Description: Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact of the radiation exposure from the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries. Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported, these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population to which they are compared. If the experience of atomic bomb survivors and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cancer and the total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the liquidators and among the residents of contaminated territories, of the order of 2,000 to 2,500. These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41,500 and 433,000 respectively (size of the exposed populations: 200,000 and 3,700,000, respectively). It is noted, however, that the exposures received by populations exposed as a result of Chernobyl are different (in type and pattern) from those of atomic bomb survivors. Predictions derived from these populations are therefore uncertain. Indeed, the extent of the increase in thyroid cancer incidence in persons exposed as children was not foreseen. In addition, only ten years have passed since the accident. It is essential therefore that monitoring of the health of the population be continued in order to assess the public health impact of the accident, even if, apart from leukemia among liquidators, little detectable increase of cancers due to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is expected.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Cardis, F.; Okeanov, A.E.; Likthariev, I.; Prisyazhniuk; Anspaugh, L.R.; Mabuchi, K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

Description: The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1991
Creator: Holmes, C.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY 1991 Task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

Description: The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The objectives of work in Fiscal Year (FY) 1991 are to analyze data and models used in Phase 1 and restructure the models to increase accuracy and reduce uncertainty in dose estimation capability. Databases will be expanded and efforts will begin to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Project scope and accuracy requirements, once defined, can be translated into additional model and data requirements later in the project. Task plans for FY 1991 have been prepared based on activities approved by the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) in October 1990 and mid-year revisions discussed at the TSP planning/budget workshop in February 1991. The activities can be divided into two broad categories: (1) model and data development and evaluation, (2) project, technical and communication support. 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: April 1, 1991
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

FY 1992 revised task plans for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

Description: The purpose of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate radiation doses from Hanford Site operations since 1944 to populations and individuals. The primary objectives of work to be performed in FY 1992 is to determine the appropriate scope (space, time, and radionuclides, pathways and individuals/population groups) and accuracy (level of uncertainty in dose estimates) for the project. Another objective is to use a refined computer model to estimate Native American tribal doses and individual doses for the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). Project scope and accuracy requirements defined in FY 1992 can translated into model and data requirements that must be satisfied during FY 1993.
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Shipler, D.B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department