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Performance Demonstration Program Plan for Nondestructive Assay of Drummed Wastes for the TRU Waste Characterization Program

Description: Each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP) to comply with the Transuranic Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WAC) (DOE/WIPP-02-3122) and the Quality Assurance Program Document (QAPD) (CBFO-94-1012). The PDP serves as a quality control check for data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. The PDP evaluates analyses of simulated headspace gases, constituents of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), and transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques.
Date: April 1, 2009
Creator: /A, N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

Description: The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).
Date: April 1, 1998
Creator: A.P.Evans; Redinger, K.E. & Holmes, M.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Feasibility Study, Optimum Natural Uranium, Gas Cooled, Graphite Moderated Nuclear Power Plant for United States Atomic Energy Commission, Idaho Operations Office

Description: Report containing "a discussion of the feasibility design and cost estimates for a gas cooled, natural uranium, graphite moderated power plant optimized for minimum power cost" (p. 3).
Date: April 1, 1958
Creator: ACF Industries Incorporated. Nuclear Products - ERCO Division.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Volatile organic compounds in indoor air: A review ofconcentrations measured in North America since 1990

Description: Central tendency and upper limit concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) measured in indoor air are summarized and reviewed. Data were obtained from published cross-sectional studies of residential and office buildings conducted in North America from 1990through the present. VOC concentrations in existing residences reported in 12 studies comprise the majority of the data set. Central tendency and maximum concentrations are compared between new and existing residences and between existing residences and office buildings. Historical changes in indoor VOC concentrations since the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 are explored by comparing the current data set with two published reviews of previous data obtained primarily in the 1980s. These historical comparisons suggest average indoor concentrations of some toxic air contaminants, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane have decreased.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: ATHodgson@lbl.gov
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Laser Hazard Analysis for Ultra-Fast Sub-Nanosecond, Mode-Locked Near Infrared Lasers Operated with Pulse Repetition Frequencies Above the Critical Frequency

Description: Ultra fast, sub-nanosecond (picosecond to femtosecond) duration, laser pulses present unique challenges when performing laser safety analysis involving mode-locked lasers, which operate at pulse repetition frequencies above the critical frequency in the near infrared wavelength bands. Two specific cases are presented, one such case that agrees and one that disagrees with the general rule on critical frequency. The results show that in all cases the appropriate maximum permissible exposure is always the smallest of the values calculated from ANSI rule 1, 2 and 3.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: AUGUSTONI, ARNOLD L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Third Edition

Description: This report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.
Date: April 1, 2005
Creator: Aabakken, J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Aquatic pathways model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds

Description: Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. To better assess possible impacts, we developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The computer programs use compartmental analysis to simulate aquatic ecosystems. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The APM will consider any aquatic pathway for which the user has transport data. Additionally, APM will estimate transport rates from physical and chemical properties of chemicals between several key compartments. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. The properties of heavier molecular weight phenolics (indanols, naphthols) are not well enough understood at this time to make similar judgements. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation (using APM) of a spill of solvent refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor.
Date: April 1, 1983
Creator: Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L. & Mellinger, P.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Aquatic Pathways Model to predict the fate of phenolic compounds. Appendixes A through D

Description: Organic materials released from energy-related activities could affect human health and the environment. We have developed a model to predict the fate of spills or discharges of pollutants into flowing or static bodies of fresh water. A computer code, Aquatic Pathways Model (APM), was written to implement the model. The APM estimates the concentrations of chemicals in fish tissue, water and sediment, and is therefore useful for assessing exposure to humans through aquatic pathways. The major pathways considered are biodegradation, fish and sediment uptake, photolysis, and evaporation. The model has been implemented with parameters for the distribution of phenols, an important class of compounds found in the water-soluble fractions of coal liquids. The model was developed to estimate the fate of liquids derived from coal. Current modeling efforts show that, in comparison with many pesticides and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), the lighter phenolics (the cresols) are not persistent in the environment. For the twelve phenolics studied, biodegradation appears to be the major pathway for elimination from aquatic environments. A pond system simulation of a spill of solvent-refined coal (SRC-II) materials indicates that phenol, cresols, and other single cyclic phenolics are degraded to 16 to 25 percent of their original concentrations within 30 hours. Adsorption of these compounds into sediments and accumulation by fish was minor. Results of a simulated spill of a coal liquid (SRC-II) into a pond show that APM predicted the allocation of 12 phenolic components among six compartments at 30 hours after a small spill. The simulation indicated that most of the introduced phenolic compounds were biodegraded. The phenolics remaining in the aquatic system partitioned according to their molecular weight and structure. A substantial amount was predicted to remain in the water, with less than 0.01% distributed in sediment or fish.
Date: April 1, 1983
Creator: Aaberg, R.L.; Peloquin, R.A.; Strenge, D.L. & Mellinger, P.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Toxic vapor cloud impacts from accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at the ICPP NO{sub x} Abatement Facility

Description: This report evaluates potential atmospheric and human health impacts that may result from accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) NO{sub x} Abatement Facility. Excess process gas releases are evaluated using a traditional Gaussian puff model. Dense two-phase aerosol releases from an 18,000 gallon liquefied ammonia storage tank and a 6,000 gallon tanker truck accident are evaluated using the refined vapor dispersion model, SLAB. The SLAB results are also compared to those using the neutral-buoyancy puff model. A SLAB sensitivity analysis is presented which examines various combinations of ambient temperatures and wind speeds in order to determine worst-case downwind air concentrations. The results from the storage tank releases indicated that potentially serious ammonia concentrations (greater than 1000 ppm) could result at downwind distances ranging from 150 meters (relief valve malfunction) to approximately 3 kilometers (catastrophic tank failure). The tank failure scenario produced concentrations that could be rapidly fatal (greater than 5000 ppm) out to 1.3 kilometers. Under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions, recognized exposure limits (IDLH, TLV-STEL) were exceeded for very large distances (greater than 15 kilometers).
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Abbott, M. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Toxic vapor cloud impacts from accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at the ICPP NO sub x Abatement Facility

Description: This report evaluates potential atmospheric and human health impacts that may result from accidental releases of anhydrous ammonia and nitrogen dioxide at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) NO{sub x} Abatement Facility. Excess process gas releases are evaluated using a traditional Gaussian puff model. Dense two-phase aerosol releases from an 18,000 gallon liquefied ammonia storage tank and a 6,000 gallon tanker truck accident are evaluated using the refined vapor dispersion model, SLAB. The SLAB results are also compared to those using the neutral-buoyancy puff model. A SLAB sensitivity analysis is presented which examines various combinations of ambient temperatures and wind speeds in order to determine worst-case downwind air concentrations. The results from the storage tank releases indicated that potentially serious ammonia concentrations (greater than 1000 ppm) could result at downwind distances ranging from 150 meters (relief valve malfunction) to approximately 3 kilometers (catastrophic tank failure). The tank failure scenario produced concentrations that could be rapidly fatal (greater than 5000 ppm) out to 1.3 kilometers. Under worst-case meteorological dispersion conditions, recognized exposure limits (IDLH, TLV-STEL) were exceeded for very large distances (greater than 15 kilometers).
Date: April 1, 1992
Creator: Abbott, M.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Radiological Dose Calculations for Fusion Facilities

Description: This report summarizes the results and rationale for radiological dose calculations for the maximally exposed individual during fusion accident conditions. Early doses per unit activity (Sieverts per TeraBecquerel) are given for 535 magnetic fusion isotopes of interest for several release scenarios. These data can be used for accident assessment calculations to determine if the accident consequences exceed Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Department of Energy evaluation guides. A generalized yearly dose estimate for routine releases, based on 1 Terabecquerel unit releases per radionuclide, has also been performed using averaged site parameters and assumed populations. These routine release data are useful for assessing designs against US Environmental Protection Agency yearly release limits.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Abbott, Michael L.; Cadwallader, Lee C. & Petti, David A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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INTOR Impurity Control and First Wall System

Description: The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work.
Date: April 1, 1983
Creator: Abdou, M. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Results from Sage

Description: The Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment (SAGE) is described. Beginning in September 1992, SAGE II data were taken with 55 tons of Ga and with significantly reduced backgrounds. The solar neutrino flux measured by 31 extractions through October 1993 is presented. The result of 69 {+-} 10 +5/{minus}7 SNU is to be compared with a Standard Solar Model prediction of 132 SNU.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Abdurashitov, J. N.; Gavrin, V. N. & Girin, S. V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Effects of gamma-ray irradiation on M1 propellant

Description: Samples of M1 single-base propellant were exposed to 10{sup 5}, 10{sup 6}, and 10{sup 7}r of Co{sup 60} gamma rays. Burning rates were determined over a pressure range of 600 to 2600 psi at -40{degrees}, 21{degrees}, and 71{degrees}C. A statistical study indicated no significant change in the burning rate and a small but statistically significant increase (6%) in the exponential factor n after the 10{sup 7}r dose. Visible deterioration resulted, as the color changed from yellow to dark brown and the surface became uneven. In view of these marked visible effects, the slight change in burning rate is surprising. One sample exposed to 5 {times} 10{sup 8}r showed severe blistering, swelling, and contraction, and embrittlement causing fracture. Nitrogen Taliani tests conducted at 110{degrees}C indicated that the decomposition rate is decreased by exposure to 10{sup 5}r, is decreased less by 10{sup 6}r, and remains unchanged after 10{sup 7}r exposure. Chemical analysis showed that the percentage of 2-nitrodiphenylamine increases with dose by a factor of 7 at 10{sup 7}r, while, at the same time, the nitrogen content of the nitrocellulose decreases with increasing dose. This indicates that a substantial part of the nitrocellulose decomposition product had reacted with the diphenylamine stabilizer. It is remarkable that propellant strands obviously modified by exposure to 10{sup 7}r showed little or no change in burning rate.
Date: April 1, 1964
Creator: Abel, J.E.; Mapes, J.E. & Levy, P.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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MCNP{trademark} Software Quality Assurance plan

Description: MCNP is a computer code that models the interaction of radiation with matter. MCNP is developed and maintained by the Transport Methods Group (XTM) of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This plan describes the Software Quality Assurance (SQA) program applied to the code. The SQA program is consistent with the requirements of IEEE-730.1 and the guiding principles of ISO 900.
Date: April 1, 1996
Creator: Abhold, H.M. & Hendricks, J.S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis of human factors effects on the safety of transporting radioactive waste materials: Technical report

Description: This report examines the extent of human factors effects on the safety of transporting radioactive waste materials. It is seen principally as a scoping effort, to establish whether there is a need for DOE to undertake a more formal approach to studying human factors in radioactive waste transport, and if so, logical directions for that program to follow. Human factors effects are evaluated on driving and loading/transfer operations only. Particular emphasis is placed on the driving function, examining the relationship between human error and safety as it relates to the impairment of driver performance. Although multi-modal in focus, the widespread availability of data and previous literature on truck operations resulted in a primary study focus on the trucking mode from the standpoint of policy development. In addition to the analysis of human factors accident statistics, the report provides relevant background material on several policies that have been instituted or are under consideration, directed at improving human reliability in the transport sector. On the basis of reported findings, preliminary policy areas are identified. 71 refs., 26 figs., 5 tabs.
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Abkowitz, Mark D.; Abkowitz, Susan B. & Lepofsky, Mark
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The role of catalyst precursor anions in coal gasification. Fifth quarterly report

Description: The aims of the proposed project are to enrich our understanding of the roles of various aqueous soluble catalyst precursor anions on the surface electrical properties of coal and to ascertain the influence of the surface charge on the adsorption, dispersion, and activities of calcium and potassium. These goals will be achieved by impregnating a demineralized North Dakota lignite (PSOC 1482) with calcium or potassium catalyst precursors containing acetate (CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}}), chloride (Cl{sup {minus}}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}), and carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}) anions. Demineralization of the coal has been completed. In the past quarter, the effects of chloride anion on the surface charge properties of the demineralized coal has been studied using calcium or potassium chlorides. Like the compounds investigated previously, increasing anion concentrations produce less negative charge on the coal surface through the interaction of calcium or potassium ions with the surface. To date, Fourier transform infrared studied aimed at an understanding of the interaction between the metal ions (Ca{sup 2+} or {sup K+}) and the coal surface oxygen functionality has not been very informative, most probably due to the high infrared absorption by coal. For this reason, we have procured a resin, Amberlite IRC-50, with carboxylic surface functionality (RCOOH, from Rohm and Haas Company) to be used for metal ion adsorption and the FTIR studies. We hope the similarity between the surface functionality on this resin and coal will provide insight on the mechanism of metal uptake by coal.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Abotsi, G. M. K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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User systems guidelines for software projects

Description: This manual presents guidelines for software standards which were developed so that software project-development teams and management involved in approving the software could have a generalized view of all phases in the software production procedure and the steps involved in completing each phase. Guidelines are presented for six phases of software development: project definition, building a user interface, designing software, writing code, testing code, and preparing software documentation. The discussions for each phase include examples illustrating the recommended guidelines. 45 refs. (DWL)
Date: April 1, 1986
Creator: Abrahamson, L. (ed.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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