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Dynamics of Crust Dissolution and Gas Release in Tank 241-SY-101

Description: Due primarily to an increase in floating crust thickness, the waste level in Tank 241-SY-101 has grown appreciably and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a potential hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from the nonconvective layer at the bottom of the tank, SY-101 will be diluted to dissolve a large fraction of the solids that allow the waste to retain gas. The plan is to transfer some waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps. In this work, mechanisms and rates of waste solids dissolution and gas releases are evaluated theoretically and experimentally. Particular emphasis is given to crust dissolution processes and associated gas releases, although dissolution and gas release from the mixed-slurry and nonconvective layers are also considered. The release of hydrogen gas to the tank domespace is modeled for a number of scenarios. Under the tank conditions expected at the time of back-dilution, no plausible continuous or sudden gas release scenarios resulting in flammable hydrogen concentrations were identified.
Date: January 24, 2000
Creator: Rassat, Scot D.; Stewart, Charles W.; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.; Antoniak, Zenen I.; Cuta, Judith M. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Strong-Sludge Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms in Clay Simulants

Description: The Hanford Site has 28 double-shell tanks (DSTs) and 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. The mission of the Department of Energy's River Protection Project is to retrieve and treat the Hanford tank waste for disposal and close the tank farms. A key aspect of the mission is to retrieve and transfer waste from the SSTs, which are at greater risk for leaking, into DSTs for interim storage until the waste is transferred to and treated in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. There is, however, limited space in the existing DSTs to accept waste transfers from the SSTs, and approaches to overcoming the limited DST space will benefit the overall mission. The purpose of this study is to summarize and analyze the key previous experiment that forms the basis for the relaxed controls and to summarize progress and results on new experiments focused on understanding the conditions that result in low gas retention. The previous large-scale test used about 50 m3 of sediment, which would be unwieldy for doing multiple parametric experiments. Accordingly, experiments began with smaller-scale tests to determine whether the desired mechanisms can be studied without the difficulty of conducting very large experiments. The most significant results from the current experiments are that progressively lower gas retention occurs in tests with progressively deeper sediment layers and that the method of gas generation also affects the maximum retention. Based on the results of this study, it is plausible that relatively low gas retention could occur in sufficiently deep tank waste in DSTs. The current studies and previous work, however, have not explored how gas retention and release will behave when two or more layers with different properties are present.
Date: February 24, 2012
Creator: Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Buchmiller, William C.; Probert, Samuel G.; Owen, Antionette T. & Brockman, Fred J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved Radioimmunotherapy of Hematologic Malignancies. [Final Report]

Description: This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.
Date: March 24, 1992
Creator: Press, Oliver W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Improved radioimmunotherapy of hematologic malignancies

Description: This research project proposes to develop novel new approaches of improving the radioimmunodetection and radioimmunotherapy of malignancies by augmenting retention of radioimmunoconjugates by tumor cells. The approaches shown to be effective in these laboratory experiments will subsequently be incorporated into out ongoing clinical trials in patients. Specific project objectives include: to study the rates of endocytosis, intracellular routing, and metabolic degradation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens on human leukemia and lymphoma cells; To examine the effects of lysosomotropic amines (e.g. chloroquine, amantadine), carboxylic ionophores (monensin, nigericin), and thioamides (propylthiouracil), on the retention of radiolabeled MoAbs by tumor cells; to examine the impact of newer radioiodination techniques (tyramine cellobiose, paraiodobenzoyl) on the metabolic degradation of radioiodinated antibodies; to compare the endocytosis, intracellular routing, and degradation of radioimmunoconjugates prepared with different radionuclides ({sup 131}Iodine, {sup 111}Indium, {sup 90}Yttrium, {sup 99m}Technetium, {sup 186}Rhenium); and to examine the utility of radioimmunoconjugates targeting oncogene products for the radioimmunotherapy and radioimmunoscintigraphy of cancer.
Date: March 24, 1992
Creator: Press, O.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integration of advanced preparation with coal liquefaction. Third quarterly technical progress report, April 1-June 30, 1984

Description: The objective of this work is to explore the technoeconomic feasibility of a series of unit operations involving: (1) wet grinding of coal in water; (2) removal of chlorine and sodium, release of undesirable mineral matter, and chemical incorporation, if needed, of a disposable liquefaction catalyst in coal via hot water teatment; (3) oil agglomeration to dewater and deash coal while retaining most of the pyrite; and (4) solvent drying of coal agglomerates to eliminate oxidation of coal, improve coal liquefaction reactivity, save energy and prepare the coal/solvent slurry for liquefaction. An apparatus capable of running five microautoclaves simultaneously has been designed and constructed. The autoclaves are shaken along the long axis to insure good mixing and pressure and temperature can be monitored in each autocalve during the run. Reproducibility experiments indicate that the standard deviation on the conversion to THF solubles is about 2.5 percent. The standard deviations in conversions to preasphaltenes and asphaltenes are much higher. A five-autoclave experiment has confirmed earlier results which indicate that wet grinding and hot-water treatment have little effect on conversion to THF solubles but that oil agglomeration followed by drying in a vacuum oven causes a large increase and oil agglomeration followed by solvent drying causes a significant but smaller increase in conversion. 5 references, 13 figures.
Date: July 24, 1984
Creator: Steedman, W.G.; Longanbach, J.R.; Muralidhara, H.S.; Folsom, D.W. & Droege, J.W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department