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ORGDP Container Test and Development Program Fire Tests of UF6-Filled Cylinders

Description: Fire tests of bare, UF{sub 6}-filled shipping cylinders were conducted at the ORGDP Rifle Range during October 1965 as part of the AEC-ORO Container Test and Development Program presently under way at the ORGDP. The multi purpose effort was to determine if the cylinders would hydrostatically or explosively rupture; the time available for fire fighting before either incident occurred; and the degree of contamination as related to the type of UF{sub 6} release, wind velocity, and terrain. In addition to the cylinder fire tests, other tests were made for further evaluation of the fire-resistant BOX foam plastic. These included a newly designed shipping drum for 5-in.-diam cylinders, and 15B-type wood shipping boxes for small containers. In one case, the latter contained a UF{sub 6}-filled Harshaw cylinder. The test times ranged from 45 to 95 min. In no instance did temperatures exceed 200 F These tests are discussed under Part B. Our Nuclear Engineering Department was responsible for site preparation and the test program. The Safety and Health Physics Departments Mr. A. F. Becher, head, provided primary assistance in the conductance of the tests and was additionally responsible for the environmental monitoring and sampling. Personnel of the Plant Shift Operations and Security, Fabrication and Maintenance, and Technical Divisions provided further support in the various operations. Mr. J. E. Wescott of the AEC-ORO and Mr. J. W. Edwards, ORGDP, were in charge of the motion and still photography. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5 in. diam x 7.5 in. Monel Harshaw, 5.0 in, diam x 30 in. Monel, and 8 in. diam x 48 in. nickel. Fill limits were 5, 55, and 250 lb of UF{sub 6} respectively, at an enrichment level of 0.22%. The larger cylinders were tested individually, with and without their metal valve covers. …
Date: January 12, 1966
Creator: A.J., Mallett
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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F(1) for B (forward) D*ln from lattice QCD

Description: The authors would like to determine |V{sub cb}| from the exclusive semi-leptonic decay B{yields}D*lv. The differential decay rate is d{Lambda}/dw = G{sub F}{sup 2}/4{pi}{sup 3}(w{sup 2}-1){sup 1/2}m{sub D*}{sup 3} (m{sub B}-m{sub D*}){sup 2}G(w)|V{sub cb}|{sup 2}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(w)|{sup 2}, where w = v {center_dot} v{prime} and G(1) = 1. At zero recoil (w = 1) heavy-quark symmetry requires F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) to be close to 1. So, |V{sub cb}| is determined by dividing measurements of d{Lambda}/dw by the phase space and well-known factors, and extrapolating to w {yields} 1. This yields |V{sub cb}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(1), and F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) is taken from ''theory''. To date models [1] or a combination of a rigorous inequality plus judgement [2] have been used to estimate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) - 1. In this work [3] they calculate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) with lattice gauge theory, in the so-called quenched approximation, but the uncertainty from quenching is included in the error budget.
Date: July 12, 2002
Creator: A.S. Kronfeld, P.B. Mackenzie and J.N. Simone
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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[Media Release: AIDS Action Council HUD Initiative]

Description: A media release from the AIDS Action Council discussing the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development's recent announcement that they would launch a new initiative that would provide federally funded housing for peoples with HIV/AIDS.
Date: August 12, 1994
Creator: AIDS Action Council
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections
open access

ENGINEERING OF THE AGS SNAKE COIL ASSEMBLY.

Description: A 30% Snake superconducting magnet is proposed to maintain polarization in the AGS proton beam, the magnetic design of which is described elsewhere. The required helical coils for this magnet push the limits of the technology developed for the RHIC Snake coils. First, fields must be provided with differing pitch along the length of the magnet. To accomplish this, a new 3-D CAD system (''Pro/Engineer'' from PTC), which uses parametric techniques to enable fast iterations, has been employed. Revised magnetic field calculations are then based on the output of the mechanical model. Changes are made in turn to the model on the basis of those field calculations. To ensure that accuracy is maintained, the final solid model is imported directly into the CNC machine programming software, rather than by the use of graphics translating software. Next, due to the large coil size and magnetic field, there was concern whether the structure could contain the coil forces. A finite element analysis was performed, using the 3-D model, to ensure that the stresses and deflections were acceptable. Finally, a method was developed using ultrasonic energy to improve conductor placement during coil winding, in an effort to minimize electrical shorts due to conductor misplacement, a problem that occurred in the RHIC helical coil program. Each of these activities represents a significant improvement in technology over that which was used previously for the RHIC snake coils.
Date: May 12, 2003
Creator: ANERELLA,M. GUPTA,R. KOVACH,P. MARONE,A. PLATE,S. POWER,K. SCHMALZLE,J. WILLEN,E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ATLAS Inner Detector Event Data Model

Description: The data model for event reconstruction (EDM) in the Inner Detector of the ATLAS experiment is presented. Different data classes represent evolving stages in the reconstruction data flow, and specific derived classes exist for the sub-detectors. The Inner Detector EDM also extends the data model for common tracking in ATLAS and is integrated into the modular design of the ATLAS high-level trigger and off-line software.
Date: December 12, 2007
Creator: ATLAS; Akesson, F.; Costa, M. J.; Dobos, D.; Elsing, M.; Fleischmann, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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MIL-L-87177 and CLT:X-10 Lubricants Improve Electrical Connector Fretting Corrosion Behavior

Description: We have conducted a fretting research project using MIL-L-87177 and CLT: X-10 lubricants on Nano-miniature connectors. When they were fretted without lubricant, individual connectors first exceeded our 0.5 ohm failure criteria from 2,341 to 45,238 fretting cycles. With additional fretting, their contact resistance increased to more than 100,000 ohms. Unmodified MIL-L-87177 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to between 430,000 and over 20,000,000 fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 modified by addition of Teflon powder delayed first failure to beyond 5 million fretting cycles. Best results were obtained when Teflon was used and also when both the straight and modified lubricants were poured into and then out of the connector. CLT: X-10 lubricant delayed the onset of first failure to beyond 55 million cycles in one test where a failure was actually observed and to beyond 20 million cycles in another that was terminated without failure. CLT: X-10 recovered an unlubricated connector driven deeply into failure, with six failed pins recovering immediately and four more recovering during an additional 420 thousand fretting cycles. MIL-L-87177 was not able to recover a connector under similar conditions.
Date: October 12, 1999
Creator: AUKLAND,NEIL R. & HANLON,JAMES T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Study of multi-muon events produced in p anti-p interactions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

Description: We report the results of a study of multi-muon events produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider and acquired with the CDF II detector using a dedicated dimuon trigger. The production cross section and kinematics of events in which both muon candidates are produced inside the beam pipe of radius 1.5 cm are successfully modeled by known processes which include heavy flavor production. In contrast, we are presently unable to fully account for the number and properties of the remaining events, in which at least one muon candidate is produced outside of the beam pipe, in terms of the same understanding of the CDF II detector, trigger, and event reconstruction.
Date: June 12, 2010
Creator: Aaltonen, T.; Phys., /Helsinki Inst. of; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Phys., /Cantabria Inst. of et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Thomson scattering diagnostic analyses to determine the energetic particle distributions in TFTR

Description: The research completed and in progress for the first period of this grant is reviewed. Specific scattering scenarios for TFTR and JET and ITER were studied. The Lodestar scattering code, SKATR, was upgraded to include anisotropic energetic ion distributions and an analytic diffraction formulation was completed. Research continues on JET studies and upgrading the code for JET and ITER relevant conditions.
Date: February 12, 1993
Creator: Aamodt, R. E.; Cheung, P. & Russell, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Thomson scattering diagnostic analyses to determine the energetic particle distributions in TFTR. Annual performance report

Description: The research completed and in progress for the first period of this grant is reviewed. Specific scattering scenarios for TFTR and JET and ITER were studied. The Lodestar scattering code, SKATR, was upgraded to include anisotropic energetic ion distributions and an analytic diffraction formulation was completed. Research continues on JET studies and upgrading the code for JET and ITER relevant conditions.
Date: February 12, 1993
Creator: Aamodt, R. E.; Cheung, P. & Russell, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Genome-Wide Identification and 3D Modeling of Proteins involved in DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (Final Report)

Description: DNA Damage Recognition and Repair (DDR&R) proteins play a critical role in cellular responses to low-dose radiation and are associated with cancer. We have performed a systematic, genome-wide computational analysis of genomic data for human genes involved in the DDR&R process. The significant achievements of this project include: 1) Construction of the computational pipeline for searching DDR&R genes, building and validation of 3D models of proteins involved in DDR&R; 2) Functional and structural annotation of the 3D models and generation of comprehensive lists of suggested knock-out mutations; and the development of a method to predict the effects of mutations. Large scale testing of technology to identify novel small binding pockets in protein structures leading to new DDRR inhibitor strategies 3) Improvements of macromolecular docking technology (see the CAPRI 1-3 and 4-5 results) 4) Development of a new algorithm for improved analysis of high-density oligonucleotide arrays for gene expression profiling; 5) Construction and maintenance of the DNA Damage Recognition and Repair Database; 6) Producing 15 research papers (12 published and 3 in preparation).
Date: August 12, 2005
Creator: Abagyan, Ruben & An, Jianghong
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ion Deflection for Final Optics in Laser Inertial Fusion Power Plants

Description: Left unprotected, both transmissive and reflective final optics in a laser-driven inertial fusion power plant would quickly fail from melting, pulsed thermal stress, or degradation of optical properties as a result of ion implantation. One potential option for mitigating this threat is to magnetically deflect the ions such that they are directed to a robust energy dump. In this paper we detail integrated studies that have been carried out to assess the viability of this approach for protecting final optics.
Date: December 12, 2005
Creator: Abbott, R P
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Interated Intelligent Industrial Process Sensing and Control: Applied to and Demonstrated on Cupola Furnaces

Description: The final goal of this project was the development of a system that is capable of controlling an industrial process effectively through the integration of information obtained through intelligent sensor fusion and intelligent control technologies. The industry of interest in this project was the metal casting industry as represented by cupola iron-melting furnaces. However, the developed technology is of generic type and hence applicable to several other industries. The system was divided into the following four major interacting components: 1. An object oriented generic architecture to integrate the developed software and hardware components @. Generic algorithms for intelligent signal analysis and sensor and model fusion 3. Development of supervisory structure for integration of intelligent sensor fusion data into the controller 4. Hardware implementation of intelligent signal analysis and fusion algorithms
Date: February 12, 2003
Creator: Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Haggard, roger; Mahmoud, Wagdy; Moore, Kevin; Clark, Denis; Larsen, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Boosted Objects: A Probe of Beyond the Standard Model Physics

Description: We present the report of the hadronic working group of the BOOST2010 workshop held at the University of Oxford in June 2010. The first part contains a review of the potential of hadronic decays of highly boosted particles as an aid for discovery at the LHC and a discussion of the status of tools developed to meet the challenge of reconstructing and isolating these topologies. In the second part, we present new results comparing the performance of jet grooming techniques and top tagging algorithms on a common set of benchmark channels. We also study the sensitivity of jet substructure observables to the uncertainties in Monte Carlo predictions.
Date: June 12, 2012
Creator: Abdesselam, A.; U., /Oxford; Kuutmann, E.Bergeaas; /DESY; Bitenc, U.; U., /Freiburg et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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High Sensitivity Neutron Assay of Grouted Spent Nuclear Fuel Sludge at Hanford

Description: The disposal of the North Loadout Pit (NLOP) waste at Hanford will produce 208-liter grouted sludge drums bearing transuranic (TRU) radionuclides and fission products. Discrimination between low level waste (LLW) and TRU waste requires a lower limit of detection (LLD) of less than 100 nCi (3700 Bq) of TRU alpha activity per gram of waste matrix in order to correctly certify the final waste form. Hanford's Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility operates two identical Imaging Passive Active Neutron (IPAN{trademark}) systems which had previously demonstrated this low detection limit capability for debris waste. These two IPAN{trademark} systems were selected as the appropriate technology to assay this challenging waste stream.
Date: October 12, 2007
Creator: Abdurrahman, N. M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Neutronic Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint U.S./Russian Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1997 - Volume 4, Part 2--Saxton Plutonium Program Critical Experiments

Description: Critical experiments with water-moderated, single-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} or UO{sub 2}, and multiple-region PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}- and UO{sub 2}-fueled cores were performed at the CRX reactor critical facility at the Westinghouse Reactor Evaluation Center (WREC) at Waltz Mill, Pennsylvania in 1965 [1]. These critical experiments were part of the Saxton Plutonium Program. The mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in these critical experiments and then loaded in the Saxton reactor contained 6.6 wt% PuO{sub 2} in a mixture of PuO{sub 2} and natural UO{sub 2}. The Pu metal had the following isotopic mass percentages: 90.50% {sup 239}Pu; 8.57% {sup 239}Pu; 0.89% {sup 240}Pu; and 0.04% {sup 241}Pu. The purpose of these critical experiments was to verify the nuclear design of Saxton partial plutonium cores while obtaining parameters of fundamental significance such as buckling, control rod worth, soluble poison worth, flux, power peaking, relative pin power, and power sharing factors of MOX and UO{sub 2} lattices. For comparison purposes, the core was also loaded with uranium dioxide fuel rods only. This series is covered by experiments beginning with the designation SX.
Date: October 12, 2000
Creator: Abdurrahman, NM
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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