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Monitoring the Energy-Use Effects of Cool Roofs on California Commercial Buildings

Description: Solar-reflective roofs stay cooler in the sun than solar-absorptive roofs. Such ''cool'' roofs achieve lower surface temperatures that reduce heat conduction into the building and the building's cooling load. The California Energy Commission has funded research in which Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has measured the electricity use and peak demand in commercial buildings to document savings from implementing the Commission's Cool Roofs program. The study seeks to determine the savings achieved by cool roofs by monitoring the energy use of a carefully selected assortment of buildings participating in the Cool Roofs program. Measurements were needed because the peak savings resulting from the application of cool roofs on different types of buildings in the diverse California climate zones have not been well characterized to date. Only a few occupancy categories (e.g., office and retail buildings) have been monitored before this, and those were done under a limited number of climatic conditions. To help rectify this situation, LBNL was tasked to select the buildings to be monitored, measure roof performance before and after replacing a hot roof by a cool roof, and document both energy and peak demand savings resulting from installation of cool roofs. We monitored the effects of cool roofs on energy use and environmental parameters in six California buildings at three different sites: a retail store in Sacramento; an elementary school in San Marcos (near San Diego); and a 4-building cold storage facility in Reedley (near Fresno). The latter included a cold storage building, a conditioning and fruit-palletizing area, a conditioned packing area, and two unconditioned packing areas (counted as one building).
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Konopaki, Steve & Rainer, Leo
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A laser-based longitudinal density monitor for the large hadroncollider

Description: We report on the development of an instrument for the measurement of the longitudinal beam profile in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The technique used, which has been successfully demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source, mixes the synchrotron radiation with the light from a mode-locked solid state laser oscillator in a non-linear crystal.The up-converted radiation is then detected with a photomultiplier and processed to extract, store and display the required information. A 40MHz laser, phase-locked to the ring radio frequency system, with a 50 pspulse length, would be suitable for measuring the dynamics of the core of each of the LHC 2808 bunches in a time span much shorter than the synchrotron period. The same instrument could also monitor the evolution of the bunch tails, the presence of untrapped particles and their diffusion into nominally empty RF buckets (''ghost bunches'') as required by the CERN specifications.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Beche, J.-F.; Byrd, J.; Datte, P.; De Santis, S.; Placidi, M.; Riot, V. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sub-Angstrom resolution with aberration-corrected TEM: Present and future

Description: Resolution is the ability to determine if a feature in an image represents two objects rather than one. Rayleigh's resolution criterion, an accepted standard in optics, was derived as a means for judging when two sources of light (stars) were distinguishable from a single source. In microscopy, resolution is the ability to determine if detail in an image represents distinct (separated) objects. In high-resolution TEM, these objects are atoms. Resolution of |d| is achieved when atoms separated by a (projected) distance |d| can be perceived as separate objects. TEM images are able to depict projected atom columns because they are interference patterns of the directly transmitted electron beam with beams diffracted from the specimen imaged under well-established conditions.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: O'Keefe, Michael A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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USE OF COAL DRYING TO REDUCE WATER CONSUMED IN PULVERIZED COAL POWER PLANTS

Description: This is the sixth Quarterly Report for this project. The background and technical justification for the project are described, including potential benefits of reducing fuel moisture, prior to firing in a pulverized coal boiler. Coal drying experiments were performed with a Powder River Basin coal to measure the effects of fluidization velocity and drying temperature on rate of drying in a batch drying process. Comparisons to computational results using the batch bed drying model show good agreement. Comparisons to drying results with North Dakota lignite at the same process conditions confirm the lignite dries slightly more rapidly than the PRB. Experiments were also carried out to determine the effects of inlet air humidity on drying rate. The specific humidity ranged from a value typical for air at temperatures near freezing to a value for 30 C air at 90 percent relative humidity. The experimental results show drying rate is strongly affected by inlet air humidity, with the rate decreasing with more humid inlet air. The temperature of the drying process also plays a strong role, with the negative impacts of high inlet moisture being less of a factor in a higher temperature drying process. Concepts for coal drying systems integrated into a power plant were developed. These make use of hot circulating cooling water from the condenser, steam extraction from the turbine cycle and thermal energy extracted from hot flue gas, in various combinations. Analyses are under way to calculate the effects of drying system design and process conditions on unit performance, emissions, and cooling tower makeup water.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Levy, Edward K.; Sarunac, Nenad & Zhang, Wei
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Investigation on the Standard for Energy and Environmental Designof Residential House in China

Description: In this research, the authors have carried out the researchto investigate the characteristics of building energy standards of theresidential building in China. Efforts have also been made to promote abetter understanding of the energy policy and relevant standard forarchitects and building designers to achieve optimal energy efficientbuilding design in China. The results can mainly summarized as follows:(1) As for the thermal environment design, the climate of China has beenclassified five zones. (2) The sunlight, lighting, ventilationenvironment of residential building have been specified in the newstandards. (3) Prescribed the building design elements, such as layout,orientation, shape, color, plan and the type of window. In particular,the thermal insulation measures for heating system has been added in hotsummer and cold winter region, which was not described in old standard.(4) It is admitted that there is still a difference compared with thestandard of many foreign countries, and the improvement in the furtherheat insulation performance and positive execution of the standardcontinue to be expected.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Yumiko, Ogawa; Weijun, Gao; Nan, Zhou; Toshiyuki, Watanabe; Hiroshi,Yoshino & Toshio, Ojima
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Implication of the Statistical Review of the Side By-Side Comparison of DWPF's ICPS

Description: The Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory received data from a series of side-by-side comparisons of two Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometers (ICPs) conducted by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Waste Laboratory Services. These two ICPs are designated as M-14, the current production ICP, and M-13, the new ICP being evaluated. The data received by SCS were outlined in the test plan [1] describing the series of tests, which involved three sample preparation methods, denoted as: ''cold chem,'' fusion, and mixed acid. A cold chemical (cold chem) preparation is used for samples of the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, product. Fusion and mixed acid dissolutions are used to prepare samples of the Slurry Mix Evaporator, SME. For each of these three dissolution methods, several types of samples were prepared and measured (for chemical composition) by both ICPs. The samples included process samples (SRAT product for cold chem and SME product for fusion and mixed acid), blanks, check standards, and samples of the Analytical Reference Glass One, ARG-1. Groups of these samples were measured under 6 different calibrations of each of the two ICPs. The measurements of the process and ARG-1 samples were provided by element (16 elements in all) as weight percent concentrations. For these samples the elemental concentrations were converted to their corresponding oxide concentrations by using the appropriate gravimetric factors. In addition to these measurements, data associated with the determinations of the limit of detection, LOD, and limit of quantification, LOQ, for each element of interest for each ICP were provided to SCS.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: EDWARDS, THOMASB.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Recovery and Sequestration of CO2 From Stationary Combustion Systems by Photosynthesis of Microalgae, Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2004

Description: Most of the anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy production. Photosynthesis has long been recognized as a means, at least in theory, to sequester anthropogenic carbon dioxide. Aquatic microalgae have been identified as fast growing species whose carbon fixing rates are higher than those of land-based plants by one order of magnitude. Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI), Aquasearch, and the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii are jointly developing technologies for recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from stationary combustion systems by photosynthesis of microalgae. The research is aimed primarily at demonstrating the ability of selected species of microalgae to effectively fix carbon from typical power plant exhaust gases. This report covers the reporting period 1 January to 31 March 2004 in which PSI, Aquasearch and University of Hawaii conducted their tasks. Based on the work during the previous reporting period, Aquasearch run first pilot scale production run with coal combustion gas to microalgae. Aquasearch started the second full scale carbon sequestration tests with propane combustion gases. Aquasearch also conducted modeling work to study the change in alkalinity in the medium resulting form microalgal photosynthesis and growth. University of Hawaii continued effort on system optimization of the CO{sub 2} sequestration system.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Nakamura, Takashi; Olaizola, Miguel & Masutani, Stephen M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Preliminary Results from Plutonium/Americium Studies Using Simulated Savannah River Site Waste Solutions

Description: To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site, SRS, high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium, Pu and americium , Am, solubility. Preliminary results from the experiments indicate hydroxide, OH-, carbonate, CO32-, nitrate, NO3-, and temperature are the predominant parameters affecting Pu and Am solubilities in alkaline salt solutions representative of those present in SRS waste tanks. This study used a statistically designed experimental matrix to evaluate the effects of six major anionic components OH-, aluminate Al(OH)4-, sulfate, SO42-, CO32-, NO3-, and nitrite, NO2-, and temperature, 25 and 80 degrees C. This work extends previous data on Pu solubility to a wider range of solution compositions and is the first systematic evaluation of Am solubility in SRS waste solutions.Analysis of the solubility data collected in nominal 1 month intervals over a 3-month period showed no time-dependence of the Pu and Am concentrations. However, the data scatter among the three data sets was sufficiently large to introduce considerable variance in model parameters. The data scatter likely indicates that not all solutions have obtained equilibrium after 3 months. We recommend that the testing continue to obtain an additional two sets of data as planned in the experimental design. First-order models of the data indicate that the Pu solubility is a function of OH- and CO32- concentrations and that the Am solubility is a function of temperature and OH-, CO32-, and NO3-concentrations. These factors are statistically significant with at least 90 percent confidence. We also evaluated the Pu solubility data obtained in this study with previous data from the literature to develop a modified response surface model. All of the salt concentrations and temperature terms are statistically significant at the 90 percent confidence level. Upon completion of the …
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: RUDISILL, TRACYS.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen Quarterly Report

Description: This report describes activities for the seventh quarter of work performed under this agreement. We successfully completed atmospheric testing in the previous quarter. We await approval from the Swedish pressure vessel board to allow us to proceed with the procurement of the vessel for super atmospheric testing.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Malone, Donald P. & Renner, William R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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IMPLEMENTING A NOVEL CYCLIC CO2 FLOOD IN PALEOZOIC REEFS

Description: Recycled CO2 will be used in this demonstration project to produce bypassed oil from the Silurian Dover 35 pinnacle reef (Otsego County) in the Michigan Basin. We began injecting CO2 in the Dover 35 field into the Salling-Hansen 4-35A well on May 6, 2004. Subsurface characterization is being completed using well log tomography animations and 3D visualizations to map facies distributions and reservoir properties in three reefs, the Belle River Mills, Chester 18, and Dover 35 Fields. The Belle River Mills and Chester 18 fields are being used as type-fields because they have excellent log and/or core data coverage. Amplitude slicing of the log porosity, normalized gamma ray, core permeability, and core porosity curves is showing trends that indicate significant heterogeneity and compartmentalization in these reservoirs associated with the original depositional fabric of the rocks. Digital and hard copy data continues to be compiled for the Niagaran reefs in the Michigan Basin. Technology transfer took place through technical presentations regarding visualization of the heterogeneity of the Niagaran reefs. Oral presentations were given at the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council workshop, Michigan Oil and Gas Association Conference, and Michigan Basin Geological Society meeting. A technical paper was submitted to the Bulletin of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists on the characterization of the Belle River Mills Field.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Wood, James R.; Quinlan, W. & Wylie, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Occurrence of Erionite at Yucca Mountain

Description: The naturally-occurring zeolite mineral erionite has a fibrous morphology and is a known human carcinogen (inhalation hazard). Erionite has been found typically in very small quantities and restricted occurrences in the course of mineralogic characterization of Yucca Mountain as a host for a high-level nuclear waste repository. The first identification of erionite was made in 1984 on the basis of morphology and chemical composition and later confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. It was found in the lower vitrophyre (Tptpv3) of the Topopah Spring Tuff in a borehole sidewall sample. Most erionite occurrences identified at Yucca Mountain are in the Topopah Spring Tuff, within an irregular zone of transition between the lower boundary of devitrified tuff and underlying glassy tuff. This zone is fractured and contains intermingled devitrified and vitric tuff. In 1997, a second host of erionite mineralization was identified in the Exploratory Studies Facility within and adjacent to a high-angle fracture/breccia zone transgressing the boundary between the lowermost devitrified tuff (Tpcplnc) and underlying moderately welded vitric tuff (Tpcpv2) of the Tiva Canyon Tuff. The devitrified-vitric transition zones where erionite is found tend to have complex secondary-mineral assemblages, some of very localized occurrence. Secondary minerals in addition to erionite may include smectite, heulandite-clinoptilolite, chabazite, opal-A, opal-CT, cristobalite, quartz, kenyaite, and moganite. Incipient devitrification within the Topopah Spring Tuff transition zone includes patches that are highly enriched in potassium feldspar relative to the precursor volcanic glass. Geochemical conditions during glass alteration may have led to local evolution of potassium-rich fluids. Thermodynamic modeling of zeolite stability shows that erionite and chabazite stability fields occur only at aqueous K concentrations much higher than in present Yucca Mountain waters. The association of erionite with opal-A, opal-CT, and moganite suggests that erionite formed at a high silica activity.
Date: July 1, 2004
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

Description: Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints that connect pipe sections together tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple castiron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and installing a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service to customers (which would result in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1 (Program Management) and Task 2 (Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications) were completed in prior quarters while Task 3 (Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves) has progressed to installing prototype sleeves in cast iron test pipe segments. Efforts in this quarter continued to focus on Tasks 4-8, with significant progress made in each. Task 4 (Design, Fabricate and Test Patch Setting Robotic Train) progressed to the design of the control electronics and pneumatic system to inflate the bladder robotic patch setting module. Task 5 (Design & Fabricate Pipe-Wall Cleaning Robot Train with Pan/Zoom/Tilt Camera) …
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Kothari, Kiran M & Pittard, Gerard T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Compressing bitmap indices by data reorganization

Description: Many scientific applications generate massive volumes of data through observations or computer simulations, bringing up the need for effective indexing methods for efficient storage and retrieval of scientific data. Unlike conventional databases, scientific data is mostly read-only and its volume can reach to the order of petabytes, making a compact index structure vital. Bit map indexing has been successfully applied to scientific databases by exploiting the fact that scientific data are enumerated or numerical. Bitmap indices can be compressed with variants of run length encoding for a compact index structure. However even this may not be enough for the enormous data generated in some applications such as high energy physics. In this paper, we study how to reorganize bitmap tables for improved compression rates. Our algorithms are used just as a preprocessing step, thus there is no need to revise the current indexing techniques and the query processing algorithms. We introduce the tuple reordering problem, which aims to reorganize database tuples for optimal compression rates. We propose Gray code ordering algorithm for this NP-Complete problem, which is an in-place algorithm, and runs in linear time in the order of the size of the database. We also discuss how the tuple reordering problem can be reduced to the traveling salesperson problem. Our experimental results on real data sets show that the compression ratio can be improved by a factor of 4 to 7.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Pinar, Ali; Tao, Tao & Ferhatosmanoglu, Hakan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTY, MI

Description: The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. During this reporting period, plans were finalized for additional surface geochemical sampling in the new Springdale Prospect field demonstration in Manistee County, Michigan. Plans were also developed to acquire additional surface geochemical data in the vicinity of the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan. The main news this reporting period is the continued success in the Springdale demonstration area. The State Springdale & O'Driscoll No.16-16 and the State Springdale & Herban 12-16 horizontal demonstration wells in Manistee County, Michigan are both flowing nearly 100 barrels of liquid hydrocarbons per day plus gas, which are good wells in Michigan. Reserves have not been established yet. A third horizontal well, the State Springdale & Wilburn 1-21 HD has been drilled and is waiting on completion. Two more horizontal wells have been permitted in the Springdale area by our industry partner.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Wood, James R.; Wylie, A. & Quinlan, W.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fiber Optical Micro-Detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants Progress Report

Description: A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Alkali salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were synthesized and heated to 280 C for one hour in air. Optical measurements of the thermally treated material confirm the potential of the salts as lumophores in high temperature fiber optic sensors. In addition sol-gel films containing Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were dip coated on quartz substrates and heated at 200 C for one hour. Conditions were developed for successfully immobilizing monomeric complexes that are compatible with sol-gel processing.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Baker, Gregory L.; Ghosh, Ruby N. & III, D.J. Osborn
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Experimental Investigation and High Resolution Simulator of In-Situ Combustion Processes Quarterly Report

Description: Accurate simulation of in-situ combustion processes is computationally very challenging because the spatial and temporal scales over which the combustion process takes place are very small. In this third quarterly report of our DoE funded research, we continue the discussion of the design of a new simulation tool based on an efficient Cartesian Adaptive Mesh Refinement technique that allows much higher grid densities to be used near typical fronts than current simulators. Also, we show preliminary results for the one-dimensional in-situ combustion simulator, which will serve as the foundation for the development of a three-dimensional simulator that can handle realistic permeability heterogeneity. On the experimental side, the combustion kinetic apparatus and the combustion tube are now fully operational, and a series of successful combustion tube runs were performed that clearly showed additives allow combustion of poorly reactive oils. We have also started scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis to investigate the sand-clay-salt mixtures that are used for combustion in which we focus on grain sizes, shapes, orientations, characteristic inter-structures, and element analysis.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Gerritsen, Margot & Kovscek, Anthony R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York

Description: There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Gas/Liquid Membranes for Natural Gas Upgrading Quarterly Report: Number 11

Description: Efforts this quarter have concentrated on design and planning for of a 50 MM scf/d dehydration skid testing at ChevronTexaco's Headlee Gas Plant in Odessa, TX. Potting and module materials testing continued. Construction of the bench-scale equipment continued. Additional funding to support the test was obtained through a contract with Research Partnership for Secure Energy for America. GTI has decreased the effort under this contract pending DOE's obligation of the total contract funding.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Meyer, Howard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Tunable coherent radiation at soft X-ray wavelengths: Generation and interferometric applications

Description: The availability of high power, spectrally and spatially coherent soft x-rays (SXR) would facilitate a wide variety of experiments as this energy region covers the primary resonances of many magnetic and biological materials. Specifically, there are the carbon and oxygen K-edges that are critical for biological imaging in the water window and the L-edges of iron, nickel, and cobalt for which imaging and scattering studies can be performed. A new coherent soft X-ray branchline at the Advanced Light Source has begun operation (beamline 12.0.2). Using the third harmonic from an 8 cm period undulator, this branch delivers coherent soft x-rays with photon energies ranging from 200eV to 1keV. This branchline is composed of two sub-branches one at 14X demagnification and the other 8X demagnification. The former is optimized for use at 500eV and the latter at 800eV. Here the expected power from the third harmonic of this undulator and the beamline design and characterization is presented. The characterization includes measurements on available photon flux as well as a series of double pinhole experiments to determine the coherence factor with respect to transverse distance. The first high quality Airy patterns at SXR wavelengths are created with this new beamline. The operation of this new beamline allows for interferometry to be performed in the SXR region. Here an interferometric experiment designed to directly determine the index of refraction of a material under test is performed. Measurements are first made in the EUV region using an established beamline (beamline12.0.1) to measure silicon, ruthenium and tantalum silicon nitride. This work is then extended to the SXR region using beamline 12.0.2 to test chromium and vanadium.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Rosfjord, Kristine Marie
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

Description: Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. This gas-hydrate project is in the final stages of a cost shared partnership between Maurer Technology, Noble Corporation, Anadarko Petroleum, and the U.S. Department of Energy's Methane Hydrate R&D program. The purpose of the project is to build on previous and ongoing R&D in the area of onshore hydrate deposition to identify, quantify and predict production potential for hydrates located on the North Slope of Alaska. The work scope drilled and cored a well The HOT ICE No.1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Williams, Thomas E.; Millheim, Keith & King, Buddy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals Quarterly Report

Description: The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (CBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main tasks for this reporting period were to correlate well logs and refine coal property maps, evaluate methane content and gas composition of Wilcox Group coals, and initiate discussions concerning collection of additional, essential data with Anadarko. To assess the volume of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered and volume of methane that can be produced in the vicinity of the proposed Sam Seymour sequestration site, we used approximately 200 additional wells logs from Anadarko Petroleum Corp. to correlate and map coal properties of the 3 coal-bearing intervals of Wilcox group. Among the maps we are making are maps of the number of coal beds, number of coal beds greater than 5 ft thick, and cumulative coal thickness for each coal interval. This stratigraphic analysis validates the presence of abundant coal for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Wilcox Group in the vicinity of Sam Seymour power plant. A typical wellbore in this region may penetrate 20 to 40 coal beds with cumulative coal thickness between 80 and 110 ft. Gas desorption analyses of approximately 75 coal samples from the 3 Wilcox coal intervals indicate that average methane content of Wilcox coals in this area ranges between 216 and 276 scf/t, basinward of the freshwater boundary indicated on a regional hydrologic map. Vitrinite reflectance data indicate that Wilcox coals are thermally immature for gas generation in this area. Minor amounts of biogenic gas may be present, basinward of the freshwater line, but we infer that most of the Wilcox coalbed gas in the deep coal beds is migrated thermogenic gas. Analysis based on …
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: McVay, Duane A.; Walter B. Ayers, Jr. & Jensen, Jerry L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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SHEAR WAVE SEISMIC STUDY COMPARING 9C3D SV AND SH IMAGES WITH 3C3D C-WAVE IMAGES

Description: The objective of this study was to compare the relative merits of shear-wave (S-wave) seismic data acquired with nine-component (9-C) technology and with three-component (3-C) technology. The original proposal was written as if the investigation would be restricted to a single 9-C seismic survey in southwest Kansas (the Ashland survey), on the basis of the assumption that both 9-C and 3-C S-wave images could be created from that one data set. The Ashland survey was designed as a 9-C seismic program. We found that although the acquisition geometry was adequate for 9-C data analysis, the source-receiver geometry did not allow 3-C data to be extracted on an equitable and competitive basis with 9-C data. To do a fair assessment of the relative value of 9-C and 3-C seismic S-wave data, we expanded the study beyond the Ashland survey and included multicomponent seismic data from surveys done in a variety of basins. These additional data were made available through the Bureau of Economic Geology, our research subcontractor. Bureau scientists have added theoretical analyses to this report that provide valuable insights into several key distinctions between 9-C and 3-C seismic data. These theoretical considerations about distinctions between 3-C and 9-C S-wave data are presented first, followed by a discussion of differences between processing 9-C common-midpoint data and 3-C common-conversion-point data. Examples of 9-C and 3-C data are illustrated and discussed in the last part of the report. The key findings of this study are that each S-wave mode (SH-SH, SV-SV, or PSV) involves a different subsurface illumination pattern and a different reflectivity behavior and that each mode senses a different Earth fabric along its propagation path because of the unique orientation of its particle-displacement vector. As a result of the distinct orientation of each mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to …
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Beecherl, John & Hardage, Bob A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Necessity of Geologic Disposal

Description: Nuclear wastes are the radioactive byproducts of nuclear power generation, nuclear weapons production, and other uses of nuclear material. Experts from around the world agree that deep geologic disposal of nuclear waste in a mined repository is the most environmentally sound means of removing these potential sources of radiation from interaction with the biosphere. Of the 360 millirem of background radiation received annually by the average American, from both natural and man-made sources, less than 1 millirem results from the nuclear fuel cycle. Spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, destined for geologic disposal, are located at 126 sites in 39 states. The proposed repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, is far more isolated from the general population than any sites where these radioactive materials are presently located. Only solid forms of high-level wastes will be transported for disposal in a geologic repository. For more than 50 years, nuclear materials have been safely transported in North America, Europe, and Asia, without a single significant radiation release. Since the 1950s, select panels from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and interagency advisory groups, and international experts selected by the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency, have examined the environmental, ethical, and intergenerational aspects of nuclear waste disposal, plus alternatives to geologic disposal. All have concluded that deep geologic disposal in a mined repository is clearly the preferred option. The concept of deep geologic disposal is based on the analogy to ore deposits, which are formed deep within the Earth's crust, commonly remain isolated from the biosphere for millions to billions of years, and are, generally, extremely difficult to detect. Before selecting the unsaturated tuffs at Yucca Mountain, DOE evaluated salt formations, basalts, and both crystalline and sedimentary rocks. Other nations generating nuclear power also plan to use deep geologic disposal, and are evaluating …
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Linden, R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Modeling Coupled Evaporation and Seepage in Ventilated Cavities

Description: Cavities excavated in unsaturated geological formations are important to activities such as nuclear waste disposal and mining. Such cavities provide a unique setting for simultaneous occurrence of seepage and evaporation. Previously, inverse numerical modeling of field liquid-release tests and associated seepage into cavities were used to provide seepage-related large-scale formation properties by ignoring the impact of evaporation. The applicability of such models was limited to the narrow range of ventilation conditions under which the models were calibrated. The objective of this study was to alleviate this limitation by incorporating evaporation into the seepage models. We modeled evaporation as an isothermal vapor diffusion process. The semi-physical model accounts for the relative humidity, temperature, and ventilation conditions of the cavities. The evaporation boundary layer thickness (BLT) over which diffusion occurs was estimated by calibration against free-water evaporation data collected inside the experimental cavities. The estimated values of BLT were 5 to 7 mm for the open underground drifts and 20 mm for niches closed off by bulkheads. Compared to previous models that neglected the effect of evaporation, this new approach showed significant improvement in capturing seepage fluctuations into open cavities of low relative humidity. At high relative-humidity values (greater than 85%), the effect of evaporation on seepage was very small.
Date: July 1, 2004
Creator: Ghezzehei, T.; Trautz, R.; Finsterle, S.; Cook, P. & Ahlers, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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