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Status Report to The Institute of Museum and Library Services July 1 through December 31, 2002

Description: This document provides a status report on the Z39.50 Interoperability Testbed Project (Z-Interop) covering the period of July 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. The previous status report covered a three-month period from April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2002. This document highlights activities and accomplishments to communicate to IMLS progress on this project since the last status report.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Moen, William E.
Partner: UNT College of Information
open access

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, were evaluated in a full-scale trial at the American Electric Power Conesville plant. Ammonia conditioning was also evaluated for comparison. ADA-51 and ammonia conditioning significantly reduced rapping and non-rapped particulate re-entrainment based on stack opacity monitor data. Based on the successful tests to date, ADA-51 will be evaluated in a long-term test.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Baldrey, Kenneth E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Yakima Fish Passage : Phase II : Fish Screen Construction.

Description: Accomplishments in 2001--2002 were spotty and limited due primarily to right-of-way problems at several sites and unanticipated changes in scope at some sites. Changes in BPA funding procedures have also impacted our ability to accomplish previously scheduled work. The following is a brief summary of work accomplished and scheduled at the remaining Phase II sites. (1) Selah-Moxee Fish Screen--Construction at this site was started in October 2001 and was completed in March 2002. We have settled the contractor claims and have closed out the construction contract. The O&M Agreement with the irrigation district was also completed in 2002. Work remains to complete the Designer's Operating Criteria. (2) Scott Fish Screen--Considerable effort was spent in 2001 and 2002 to try to resolve right-of-way issues at this site. However, these problems proved to be insurmountable, and this site has been dropped from the Phase n Program. The only thing remaining on Scott (as far as the Phase n program is concerned) is to prepare a brief wrap-up report to send to all interested parties to summarize what has been done and to explain the status of the diversion from a fish passage standpoint. (3) Packwood Fish Screen--Designs and specifications for the civil works were completed for this screen in 2002. The screen, screen cleaner, and other metal work have already been fabricated by WDFW Screen Shop. Award of a construction contract was scheduled for September 2002. The BP A lands staff has experienced significant delays in obtaining an easement from the state of Washington for a piece of the John Wayne Trail right-of-way currently occupied by the existing screen. As a result, the construction contract has been rescheduled for award in the fall of 2003. We are ready to proceed with construction if BP A can obtain the necessary easements by May …
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: United States. Bureau of Reclamation. Pacific Northwest Region.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 271: Areas 25, 26, and 27 Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: The Areas 25, 26 and 27 Septic Systems are in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 271. This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for CAU 271. CAU 271 is located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CAS): CAS 25-04-1, Septic System; CAS 25-04-03, Septic System; CAS25-04-04, Septic System; CAS 25-04-08, Septic System; CAS 25-04-09, Septic System; CAS 25-04-10, Septic System; CAS 25-04-11, Septic System; CAS 26-03-01, Contaminated Water Reservoir; CAS 26-04-1, Septic System; CAS 26-04-02, Septic System; CAS 26-05-01, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS-26-05-03, Septic System; CAS 26-05-04, Septic System; CAS 26-05-05, Septic System; and CAS 27-05-02, Leachfield.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Jackson, R. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Two-photon exchange and elastic electron-proton scattering

Description: Two-photon exchange contributions to elastic electron-proton scattering cross sections are evaluated in a simple hadronic model including the finite size of the proton. The corrections are found to be small, but with a strong angular dependence at fixed Q{sup 2}. This is significant for the Rosenbluth technique for determining the ratio of electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, and partly reconciles the apparent discrepancy with the results of the polarization transfer technique.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Blunden, Peter; Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr & Tjon, John
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

Improving air handler efficiency in residential HVAC applications

Description: In continuing the development of energy efficiency standards, consideration has turned to air handlers used for heating and air conditioning of consumer residences. These air handlers have typical efficiencies of about 10% to 15% due to poor electric motor performance and aerodynamically poor fans and fan housings. This study was undertaken to examine some of these performance issues, under carefully controlled laboratory conditions, to support potential regulatory changes. In addition, this study examined the performance of a prototype air handler fan assembly that offers the potential for substantial increases in performance. This prototype and a standard production fan were tested in a full-scale duct system and test chamber at LBNL which was specifically designed for testing heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. The laboratory tests compared efficiency, total airflow, sensitivity to duct system flow resistance, and the effects of installation in a smaller cabinet. The test results showed that, averaged over a wide range of operating conditions, the prototype air handler had about twice the efficiency of the standard air handler and was less sensitive to duct system flow resistance changes. The performance of both air handlers was significantly reduced by reducing the space between the air handler and the cabinet it was installed in. Therefore any fan rating needs to be performed using the actual cabinet it will be used in.
Date: August 1, 2003
Creator: Walker, Iain S.; Mingee, Michael D. & Brenner, Douglas E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Reducing indoor residential exposures to outdoor pollutants

Description: The basic strategy for providing indoor air quality in residences is to dilute indoor sources with outdoor air. This strategy assumes that the outdoor air does not have pollutants at harmful levels or that the outdoor air is, at least, less polluted than the indoor air. When this is not the case, different strategies need to be employed to ensure adequate air quality in the indoor environment. These strategies include ventilation systems, filtration and other measures. These strategies can be used for several types of outdoor pollution, including smog, particulates and toxic air pollutants. This report reviews the impacts that typical outdoor air pollutants can have on the indoor environment and provides design and operational guidance for mitigating them. Poor quality air cannot be used for diluting indoor contaminants, but more generally it can become an indoor contaminant itself. This paper discusses strategies that use the building as protection against potentially hazardous outdoor pollutants, including widespread pollutants, accidental events, and potential attacks.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Sherman, Max H. & Matson, Nance E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Compilation of Gas Intrusion Measurements, Variations, and Consequence Modeling for SPR Caverns

Description: The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H{sub 2}S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, …
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: HINKEBEIN, THOMAS E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Material Properties Test to Determine Ultimate Strain and True Stress-True Strain Curves for High Yield Steels

Description: This testing was undertaken to develop material true stress-true strain curves for elastic-plastic material behavior for use in performing transient analysis. Based on the conclusions of this test, the true stress-true strain curves derived herein are valid for use in elastic-plastic finite element analysis for structures fabricated from these materials. In addition, for the materials tested herein, the ultimate strain values are greater than those values cited as the limits for the elastic-plastic strain acceptance criteria for transient analysis.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Arpin, K. R. & Trimble, T. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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KINETICS OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION SORBENTS FOR TRANSPORT REACTORS

Description: Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of EX-SO3 was examined in this report. This sorbent was obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbent in the form of 110 {micro}m particles are reacted with 18000-ppm hydrogen sulfide at 350-550 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.069-0.088 s. The range of reaction duration is 4-180 s.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Kwon, K.C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Spears & Associates, Inc
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Hybrid Sulfur Recovery Process for Natural Gas Upgrading Quarterly Report

Description: This first quarter report of 2003 describes progress on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to test a hybrid sulfur recovery process for natural gas upgrading. The process concept represents a low cost option for direct treatment of natural gas streams to remove H{sub 2}S in quantities equivalent to 0.2-25 metric tons (LT) of sulfur per day. This process is projected to have lower capital and operating costs than the competing technologies, amine/aqueous iron liquid redox and amine/Claus/tail gas treating, and have a smaller plant footprint, making it well suited to both on-shore and off-shore applications. CrystaSulf{reg_sign} (service mark of CrystaTech, Inc.) is a new nonaqueous sulfur recovery process that removes hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from gas streams and converts it into elemental sulfur. CrystaSulf features high sulfur recovery similar to aqueous-iron liquid redox sulfur recovery processes, but differs from the aqueous processes in that CrystaSulf controls the location where elemental sulfur particles are formed. In the hybrid process, approximately 1/3 of the total H{sub 2}S in the natural gas is first oxidized to SO{sub 2} at low temperatures over a heterogeneous catalyst. Low temperature oxidation is done so that the H{sub 2}S can be oxidized in the presence of methane and other hydrocarbons without oxidation of the hydrocarbons. The project involves the development of a catalyst using laboratory/bench-scale catalyst testing, and then demonstration of the catalyst at CrystaTech's pilot plant in west Texas. Previous reports described development of a catalyst with the required selectivity and efficiency for producing sulfur dioxide from H{sub 2}S. In the laboratory, the catalyst was shown to be robust and stable in the presence of several intentionally added contaminants, including condensate from the pilot plant site. Bench-scale catalyst testing at the CrystaSulf pilot plant using the actual pilot plant gas was …
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Dalrymple, Dennis
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Characterization of Turbiditic Oil Reservoirs Based on Geophysical Models of Their Formation

Description: Two aspects of the characterization of turbiditic oil reservoirs based on geophysical models of their formation are discussed in this report. First, we have developed a new, more accurate and computationally faster finite-element method (FEM) for simulating the flow and deposition of turbidity currents. Although a finite volume method had been presented and discussed in a previous report, it was discovered to be insufficient for our purposes of simulating turbidity flows. The new method allows variable grids near the regions of large deposition, which are of most interest, and numerically results in banded, sparse matrices that are much faster to solve. Examples of the success of the method are presented. In the second part of this report, we present and discuss a preliminary study on the feasibility of matching the results of a sediment transport model to field data. With the simulation of the turbidity current we can create an entire turbiditic deposit. This requires the initial conditions of the flow, such as the amount of sediment, the volume or flow rate of the current, etc, which are of course unavailable. This requires an estimate of the initial conditions of the flow, which can be determined from limited data from the deposit. We used the Excel optimization routine Solver to reproduce a one-dimensional algebraically simulated deposit with and without measurement noise. Results indicate that such matching is feasible, provided that the noise is below certain thresholds, dependent on the size of the deposit and the number data points constraining the parameter estimation.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Bonnecaze, Roger T. & Lakshminarasimhan, Srivatsan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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SEALING LARGE-DIAMETER CAST-IRON PIPE JOINTS UNDER LIVE CONDITIONS

Description: Utilities in the U.S. operate over 75,000 km (47,000 miles) of old cast-iron pipes for gas distribution. The bell-and-spigot joints tend to leak as these pipes age. Current repair practices are costly and highly disruptive. The objective of this program is to design, test and commercialize a robotic system capable of sealing multiple cast-iron bell and spigot joints from a single pipe entry point. The proposed system will perform repairs while the pipe remains in service by traveling through the pipe, cleaning each joint surface, and attaching a stainless-steel sleeve lined with an epoxy-impregnated felt across the joint. This approach will save considerable time and labor, avoid traffic disruption, and eliminate any requirement to interrupt service (which results in enormous expense to utilities). Technical challenges include: (1) repair sleeves must compensate for diametric variation and eccentricity of cast-iron pipes; (2) the assembly must travel long distances through pipes containing debris; (3) the pipe wall must be effectively cleaned in the immediate area of the joint to assure good bonding of the sleeve; and (4) an innovative bolt-on entry fitting is required to conduct repair operations on live mains. The development effort is divided into eleven tasks. Task 1--Program Management was previously completed. Two reports, one describing the program management plan and the other consisting of the technology assessment, were submitted to the DOE COR in the first quarter. Task 2--Establishment of Detailed Design Specifications and Task 3--Design and Fabricate Ratcheting Stainless-Steel Repair Sleeves are now well underway. First-quarter activities included conducting detailed analyses to determine the capabilities of coiled-tubing locomotion for entering and repairing gas mains and the first design iteration of the joint-sealing sleeve. The maximum horizontal reach of coiled tubing inside a pipeline before buckling prevents further access was calculated for a wide range of coiled-tubing string designs …
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Kothari, Kiran M. & Pittard, Gerard T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Indoor Pollutant Mixing Time in an Isothermal Closed Room: An Investigation Using CFD

Description: We report on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of mixing time of a pollutant in an unventilated, mechanically mixed, isothermal room. The study aims to determine: (1) the adequacy of the standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes two-equation ({kappa}-{var_epsilon}) turbulence model for predicting the mixing time under these conditions and (2) the extent to which the mixing time depends on the room airflow, rather than the source location within the room. The CFD simulations modeled the 12 mixing time experiments performed by Drescher et al. (Indoor Air 5 (1995) 204) using a point pulse release in an isothermal, sealed room mechanically mixed with variable power blowers. Predictions of mixing time were found in good agreement with experimental measurements, over an order of magnitude variation in blower power. Additional CFD simulations were performed to investigate the relation between pollutant mixing time and source location. Seventeen source locations and five blower configurations were investigated. Results clearly show large dependence of the mixing time on the room airflow, with some dependence on source location. We further explore dependence of mixing time on the velocity and turbulence intensity at the source location. Implications for positioning air-toxic sensors in rooms are briefly discussed.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Gadgil, A. J.; Lobscheid, C.; Abadie, M. O. & Finlayson, E. U.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Contaminant Boundary at the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) have reached agreement on a corrective action strategy applicable to address the extent and potential impact of radionuclide contamination of groundwater at underground nuclear test locations. This strategy is described in detail in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 2000). As part of the corrective action strategy, the nuclear detonations that occurred underground were identified as geographically distinct corrective action units (CAUs). The strategic objective for each CAU is to estimate over a 1,000-yr time period, with uncertainty quantified, the three-dimensional extent of groundwater contamination that would be considered unsafe for domestic and municipal use. Two types of boundaries (contaminant and compliance) are discussed in the FFACO that will map the three-dimensional extent of radionuclide contamination. The contaminant boundary will identify the region wi th 95 percent certainty that contaminants do not exist above a threshold value. It will be prepared by the DOE and presented to NDEP. The compliance boundary will be produced as a result of negotiation between the DOE and NDEP, and can be coincident with, or differ from, the contaminant boundary. Two different thresholds are considered for the contaminant boundary. One is based on the enforceable National Primary Drinking Water Regulations for radionuclides, which were developed as a requirement of the Safe Drinking Water Act. The other is a risk-based threshold considering applicable lifetime excess cancer-risk-based criteria The contaminant boundary for the Faultless underground nuclear test at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is calculated using a newly developed groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model that incorporates aspects of both the original three-dimensional model (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and the two-dimensional model developed for the Faultless data decision analysis (DDA) (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). This new model includes the uncertainty …
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Pohll, Greg; Pohlmann, Karl; Daniels, Jeff; Hassan, Ahmed & Chapman, Jenny
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions are engaged in a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the fly ash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. During this reporting quarter, installation of a liquid flue gas conditioning system was completed at the American Electric Power Conesville Plant, Unit 3. This plant fires a bituminous coal and has opacity and particulate emissions performance issues related to fly ash re-entrainment. Two cohesivity-specific additive formulations, ADA-44C and ADA-51, will be evaluated. In addition, ammonia conditioning will also be compared.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Baldrey, Kenneth E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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High Speed 2D Hadamard Transform Spectral Imager

Description: Hadamard Transform Spectrometer (HTS) approaches share the multiplexing advantages found in Fourier transform spectrometers. Interest in Hadamard systems has been limited due to data storage/computational limitations and the inability to perform accurate high order masking in a reasonable amount of time. Advances in digital micro-mirror array (DMA) technology have opened the door to implementing an HTS for a variety of applications including fluorescent microscope imaging and Raman imaging. A Hadamard transform spectral imager (HTSI) for remote sensing offers a variety of unique capabilities in one package such as variable spectral and temporal resolution, no moving parts (other than the micro-mirrors) and vibration tolerance. Two approaches to for 2D HTS systems have been investigated in this LDRD. The first approach involves dispersing the incident light, encoding the dispersed light then recombining the light. This method is referred to as spectral encoding. The other method encodes the incident light then disperses the encoded light. The second technique is called spatial encoding. After creating optical designs for both methods the spatial encoding method was selected as the method that would be implemented because the optical design was less costly to implement.
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: WEHLBURG, JOSEPH C.; WEHLBURG, CHRISTINE M.; SMITH, JODY L.; SPAHN, OLGA B.; SMITH, MARK W. & BONEY, CRAIG M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Blade Manufacturing Improvement: Remote Blade Manufacturing Demonstration

Description: The objective of this program was to investigate manufacturing improvements for wind turbine blades. The program included a series of test activities to evaluate the strength, deflection, performance, and loading characteristics of the prototype blades. The original contract was extended in order to continue development of several key blade technologies identified in the project. The objective of the remote build task was to demonstrate the concept of manufacturing wind turbine blades at a temporary manufacturing facility in a rural environment. TPI Composites successfully completed a remote manufacturing demonstration in which four blades were fabricated. The remote demonstration used a manufacturing approach which relied upon material ''kits'' that were organized in the factory and shipped to the site. Manufacturing blades at the wind plant site presents serious logistics difficulties and does not appear to be the best approach. A better method appears to be regional manufacturing facilities, which will eliminate most of the transportation cost, without incurring the logistical problems associated with fabrication directly onsite. With this approach the remote facilities would use commonly available industrial infrastructure such as enclosed workbays, overhead cranes, and paved staging areas. Additional fatigue testing of the M20 root stud design was completed with good results. This design provides adhesive bond strength under fatigue loading that exceeds that of the fastener. A new thru-stud bonding concept was developed for the M30 stud design. This approach offers several manufacturing advantages; however, the test results were inconclusive.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: ASHWILL, THOMAS D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Beam optics of a 10-cm diameter high current heavy ion diode

Description: Typically a large diameter surface ionization source is used to produce > 0.5 A K{sup +} current with emittance < 1 {pi}-mm-mrad for heavy ion fusion experiments. So far we have observed aberrations that are slightly different from those predicted by computer simulations. We have now set up an experiment to study in detail the beam optics of such a large diameter ion diode and to benchmark the simulation code.
Date: May 1, 2003
Creator: Kwan, J. W.; Vay, J. L.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Halaxa, E.; Westenskow, G. & Haber, I.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Estimating Radiological Doses to Predators Foraging in a Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Area

Description: Since 1957, Los Alamos National Laboratory has operated Area G as its low-level, solid radioactive waste management and disposal area. Although the waste management area is developed, plants, small mammals, and avian and mammalian predators still occupy the less disturbed and revegetated portions of the land. For almost a decade, we have monitored the concentrations of selected radionuclides in soils, plants, and small mammals at Area G. The radionuclides tritium, plutonium-238, and plutonium-239 are regularly found at levels above regional background in all three media. Based on radionuclide concentrations in mice collected from 1994 to 1999, we calculated doses to higher trophic levels (owl, hawk, kestrel, and coyote) that forage on the waste management area. These predators play important functions in the regional ecosystems and are an important part of local Native American traditional tales that identify the uniqueness of their culture. The estimated doses are compared to Department of Energy's interim limit of 0.1 rad/day for the protection of terrestrial wildlife. We used exposure parameters that were derived from the literature for each receptor, including Environmental Protection Agency's exposure factors handbook. Estimated doses to predators ranged from 9E-06 to 2E-04 rad/day, assuming that they forage entirely on the waste management area. These doses are greater than those calculated for predators foraging exclusively in reference areas, but are still well below the interim dose limit. We believe that these calculated doses represent upper-bound estimates of exposure for local predators because the larger predators forage over areas that are much greater than the 63-acre waste management area. Based on these results, we concluded that predators foraging on this area do not face a hazard from radiological exposure under current site conditions.
Date: March 1, 2003
Creator: L.Soholt; G.Gonzales; P.Fresquez; K.Bennett & E.Lopez
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

A Generic Procedure for BRDF Normalization of Remotely Sensed Data

Description: A generic procedure for Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) normalization for airborne multispectral images has been developed and implemented as an add-on module of ENVI at the U.S. Department of Energy's Remote Sensing Laboratory. The main advantage of this procedure is that it does not require multiple image acquisitions over the same area for establishing empirical BRDF functions.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Yuan, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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