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Editing Tips for Technical Publications in the Joint Nuclear Weapons Publication System (JNWPS)

Description: These editing tips contain helpful suggestions to assist writers who are writing, editing, and publishing technical publications in the JNWPS. The suggestions clarify some of the most common writing problems and requirements of two publications used in the JNWPS: ''DOE-DTRA TP 1-1, Joint Nuclear Weapons Publications System Operating Procedures, Specifications, and Standards, and United States Government Printing Office Style Manual''. Topics include requirements for abbreviations, formats for drafts, layouts of illustrations and tables, appropriate wording for interim changes, guidance for creating a list of effective pages, how to insert and delete pages and paragraphs, referencing other technical publications, use of revision bars, requirements for safety precautions, use of hyphens, and how to place warnings, cautions, and notes. Also included are a writer's checklist, samples of draft title pages, and a section of helpful tips for the writers who use the department's desktop publishing software program, Adobe{reg_sign} FrameMaker{reg_sign}.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: ALLEN, TARA S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Rapid Ultrasensitive Chemical-Fingerprint Detection of Chemical and Biochemical Warfare Agents

Description: Vibrational spectra can serve as chemical fingerprints for positive identification of chemical and biological warfare molecules. The required speed and sensitivity might be achieved with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) using nanotextured metal surfaces. Systematic and reproducible methods for preparing metallic surfaces that maximize sensitivity have not been previously developed. This work sought to develop methods for forming high-efficiency metallic nanostructures that can be integrated with either gas or liquid-phase chem-lab-on-a-chip separation columns to provide a highly sensitive, highly selective microanalytical system for detecting current and future chem/bio agents. In addition, improved protein microchromatographic systems have been made by the creation of acrylate-based porous polymer monoliths that can serve as protein preconcentrators to reduce the optical system sensitivity required to detect and identify a particular protein, such as a bacterial toxin.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: ASHBY, CAROL I.; SHEPODD, TIMOTHY J.; YELTON, WILLIAM G. & MURON, DAVID J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Measurement of Beam-Spin Asymmetries for Deep Inelastic pi{sup +} Electroproduction

Description: We report the first evidence for a non-zero beam-spin azimuthal asymmetry in the electroproduction of positive pions in the deep-inelastic region. Data have been obtained using a polarized electron beam of 4.3 GeV and with the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). The amplitude of the sin phi modulation increases with the momentum of the pion relative to the virtual photon, z, with an average amplitude of 0.038+/-0.005+/-0.003 for 0.5<z<0.8 range.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Avakian, H.; Burkert, Volker D.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa & al., et.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A Review of Production System Models of Cognition and Example Demonstration

Description: There have been significant efforts to develop cognitively plausible software architectures of human information processing in the last three decades. This report summarizes several architectures that continue to be developed. The specific type of cognitive models developed are known as production system architectures, which refers to the characterization of knowledge in terms of procedural (''how-to'' knowledge) condition-action relationships consisting of declarative (''what'' or factual) knowledge. To illustrate the ability for these models to instantiate human cognitive performance, a simulation using ACT-R (Adaptive Control of Thought - Rational) was implemented for a supervisory control task. Correlations between simulated and human learning of the task were measured and yielded correlations as high as 0.93.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: BRANNON, NATHAN G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Switchable Hydrophobic-Hydrophilic Surfaces

Description: Tethered films of poly n-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) films have been developed as materials that can be used to switch the chemistry of a surface in response to thermal activation. In water, PNIPAM exhibits a thermally-activated phase transition that is accompanied by significant changes in polymer volume, water contact angle, and protein adsorption characteristics. New synthesis routes have been developed to prepare PNIPAM films via in-situ polymerization on self-assembled monolayers. Swelling transitions in tethered films have been characterized using a wide range of techniques including surface plasmon resonance, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy, interfacial force microscopy, neutron reflectivity, and theoretical modeling. PNIPAM films have been deployed in integrated microfluidic systems. Switchable PNIPAM films have been investigated for a range of fluidic applications including fluid pumping via surface energy switching and switchable protein traps for pre-concentrating and separating proteins on microfluidic chips.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: BUNKER, BRUCE C.; HUBER, DALE L.; KENT, MICHAEL S.; YIM, HYUN; CURRO, JOHN G.; LOPEZ, GABRIEL P. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Engineering Study for Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA)/Shielded Materials Facility (SMF) Waste Removal

Description: This engineering study identifies the options for removal of radioactive waste from the Shielded Materials Facility (SMF) located within the 324 Building, 300 area, of the Hanford Site.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Bailey, Sharon A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Baker, Carl P.; Catalan, Michael A. & Valdez, Patrick L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Monitor and Protect Wigwam River Bull Trout for Koocanusa Reservoir : Summary of the Skookumchuck Creek Bull Trout Enumeration Project Final Report 2000-2002.

Description: This report summarizes the third and final year of a bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) enumeration project on Skookumchuck Creek in southeastern British Columbia. The fence and traps were operated from September 6th to October 11th 2002 in order to enumerate post-spawning bull trout. During the study period a total of 309 bull trout were captured at the fence. In total, 16 fish of undetermined sex, 114 males and 179 females were processed at the fence. Length and weight data, as well as recapture information, were collected for these fish. An additional 41 bull trout were enumerated upstream of the fence by snorkeling prior to fence removal. Coupled with the fence count, the total bull trout enumerated during the project was 350 individuals. Several fish that were tagged in the lower Bull River were recaptured in 2002, as were repeat and alternate year spawners previously enumerated in past years at the fence. A total of 149 bull trout redds were enumerated on the ground in 2002, of which 143 were in the 3.0 km index section (river km 27.5-30.5) that has been surveyed over the past six years. The results of the three year project are summarized, and population characteristics are discussed.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Baxter, Jeremy & Baxter, James S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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FIELD TRIALS OF NEWLY DEVELOPED POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT SUBMERSIBLE PUMP

Description: The purpose of this grant was to evaluate under real world conditions the performance of a new type of downhole pump, the hydraulically driven submersible diaphragm pump. This pump is supplied by Pumping Solutions Incorporated, Albuquerque NM. The original scope of the project was to install 10 submersible pumps, and compare that to 10 similar installations of rod pumps. As an operator, the system as tested was not ready for prime time. The PSI group did improve the product and offered excellent service. The latest design appears to be much better, but more test data is needed to show short run life is not a problem. This product should continue to be developed; the testing did not uncover any fundamental problems that would preclude it's widespread use. On the positive side, the pump was easy to run, was more power efficient then a rod pump, and is the only submersible that could handle the large quantities of solids typical of CBM production. The product shows much promise for the future, and with continued design and testing, this type of submersible pump has the potential to become the standard of the industry.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Beard, Rob & Traylor, Leland
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities

Description: Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Bierschbach, MC; Haffner, DR; Schneider, KJ & Short, SM
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Plutonium Decontamination of Uranium using CO2 Cleaning

Description: A concern of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) and Defense Programs (DP), and of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), is the disposition of thousands of legacy and recently generated plutonium (Pu)-contaminated, highly enriched uranium (HEU) parts. These parts take up needed vault space. This presents a serious problem for LLNL, as site limit could result in the stoppage of future weapons work. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (NN-60) will also face a similar problem as thousands of HEU parts will be created with the disassembly of site-return pits for plutonium recovery when the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) becomes operational. To send HEU to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Y-12 Plant for disposition, the contamination for metal must be less than 20 disintegrations per minute (dpm) of swipable transuranic per 100 cm{sup 2} of surface area or the Pu bulk contamination for oxide must be less than 210 parts per billion (ppb). LANL has used the electrolytic process on Pu-contaminated HEU weapon parts with some success. However, this process requires that a different fixture be used for every configuration; each fixture cost approximately $10K. Moreover, electrolytic decontamination leaches the uranium metal substrate (no uranium or plutonium oxide) from the HEU part. The leaching rate at the uranium metal grain boundaries is higher than that of the grains and depends on the thickness of the uranium oxide layer. As the leaching liquid flows past the HEU part, it carries away plutonium oxide contamination and uranium oxide. The uneven uranium metal surface created by the leaching becomes a trap for plutonium oxide contamination. In addition, other DOE sites have used CO{sub 2} cleaning for Pu decontamination successfully. In the 1990's, the …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Blau, M
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Photocharge Transport and Recombination Measurements in Amorphous Silicon Films and Solar Cells by Photoconductive Frequency Mixing: Final Subcontract Report, 20 April 1998-30 June 2002

Description: The tasks carried out under this subcontract focused on characterizing the charge transport, opto-electronic, and structural properties of a number of amorphous and microcrystalline semiconductors prepared by several techniques. The dominant approach to accomplish the tasks of the present phase of the program is the photoconductive frequency mixing technique. This technique enabled us to determine separately the drift mobility and the photomixing lifetime of the photogenerated carriers. The technique is based on the idea of heterodyne detection for photoconductors. When two similarly polarized monochromatic optical beams of slightly different frequencies are incident on a photoconductor, the photocurrent produced, when a dc bias is applied, will contain components resulting from the square of the sum of the incident electric fields. Consequently, a photocurrent composed of a dc and a microwave current due to the beat frequency of the incident fields will be produced; these two currents allow a separate determination of the drift mobility and the photomixing lifetime. In the present work, we improved the instrumentation of the photomixing measurements by applying bias pulses of arbitrary width and frequency. The longitudinal modes of a He-Ne laser were used to generate a beat frequency of 252 MHz; all the measurements were performed at this frequency for the data indicated in the accompanying figures and tables. Results from this technique, as well as FTIR, XRD, SAXS, and optical spectroscopy, are presented in the full report.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Braunstein, R.; Boshta, M.; Sheng, S.; Kattwinkel, A.; Liebe, J. & Sun, G.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Light-Front Quantization of Gauge Theories

Description: Light-front wavefunctions provide a frame-independent representation of hadrons in terms of their physical quark and gluon degrees of freedom. The light-front Hamiltonian formalism provides new nonperturbative methods for obtaining the QCD spectrum and eigensolutions, including resolvant methods, variational techniques, and discretized light-front quantization. A new method for quantizing gauge theories in light-cone gauge using Dirac brackets to implement constraints is presented. In the case of the electroweak theory, this method of light-front quantization leads to a unitary and renormalizable theory of massive gauge particles, automatically incorporating the Lorentz and 't Hooft conditions as well as the Goldstone boson equivalence theorem. Spontaneous symmetry breaking is represented by the appearance of zero modes of the Higgs field leaving the light-front vacuum equal to the perturbative vacuum. I also discuss an ''event amplitude generator'' for automatically computing renormalized amplitudes in perturbation theory. The importance of final-state interactions for the interpretation of diffraction, shadowing, and single-spin asymmetries in inclusive reactions such as deep inelastic lepton-hadron scattering is emphasized.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Brodskey, Stanley
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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An investigation of the effects of history dependent damage in time dependent fracture mechanics: nano-scale studies of damage evolution

Description: High-temperature operation of technical engineering systems is critical for system efficiency, and will be a key driver in the future US DOE energy policy. Developing an understanding of high-temperature creep and creep-fatigue failure processes is a key driver for the research work described here. The focus is on understanding the high-temperature deformation and damage development on the nano-scale (50 to 500 nm) level. The high-temperature damage development process, especially with regard to low and high cyclic loading, which has received little attention to date, is studied. Damage development under cyclic loading develops in a fashion quite different from the constant load situation. The development of analytical methodologies so that high-temperature management of new systems can be realized is the key goal of this work.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Brust, F. W., Jr.; Mohan, R.; Yang, Y.P.; Oh, J. & Katsube, N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Wettability and Prediction of Oil Recovery From Reservoirs Developed With Modern Drilling and Completion Fluids

Description: We report on a preliminary study of wetting effects of synthetic oil-based mud components on the wetting of mica surfaces using drilling mud fractions obtained from two wells drilled with synthetic oil-based muds (SBM). We have used these SBM fractions, one a filtrate and the other a centrifugate, to develop testing protocols for studies on smooth mica surfaces. Both SBM fractions changed the wetting of clean, dry mica surfaces, making them preferentially oil-wet. Solvents were tested to clean the mica with varying degrees of success. In tests designed to simulate contact between SBM fractions and reservoir pore surface, changes of wetting of mica that had previously been exposed to brine and crude oil were examined using six different crude oils in combination with several different brine formulations. Four of the six oils produced preferentially water-wet surfaces whereas two produced fairly oil-wet conditions on mica. Exposure to the SBM fractions tended to increase decane/water advancing contact angles on the more water-wet surfaces and to decrease those on the more oil-wet surfaces. Cleaning solvents were compared for their efficacy and the possibility of wettability restoration was examined for some of the cleaned surfaces.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Buckley, Jill S. & Morrow, Norman R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Does Iron Fertilization Lead to Enhanced Carbon Sequestration? A Synthesis of Polar Star Results.

Description: This research synthesized activities related to work conducted as part of the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) which investigated the effects of iron fertilization on enhanced carbon sequestration. The primary interest was in the fate of sinking particles which carry carbon to the deep ocean, where it can be sequestered from the atmosphere for >100-1000 year time scales. This was accomplished through direct measurements of thorium-234, a naturally occurring particle reactive radionuclide that traces shallow particle export; SF6 measurements to track the position of the Fe fertilized region; and the collection of ancillary data and samples to augment the study of major C, nutrient and elemental budgets as well as appropriate samples for biological study. Results of this work show a small, but progressively increasing flux of particulate organic C to depth as a consequence of Fe fertilization. This is the first data set to show any effect of Fe fertilization on C sequestration in the Southern Ocean. The changes in particle export during SOFeX are significant, but only possible to detect given what is arguably the largest 234Th data set ever collected as part of an oceanographic experiment. Most prior 234Th studies, simply use a steady-state approximation and ignore advective and diffusive fluxes in the calculation of 234Th fluxes. High resolution time-series of average 0-50m 234Th activities in and out of the Southern patch find a clear steady decrease in 234Th flux that is slightly larger in vs. out of the Fe fertilized patch. This decrease must be included in the full 234Th flux calculation and the deliberate tagging of this water mass with SF6 combined with time-series sampling allowed for a careful evaluation of this non-steady state (NSS) term. Likewise, the addition of SF6 allows for the evaluation of vertical exchange (via the gradient of SF6 below the …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Buesseler, K. O.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DEMONSTRATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES-INDUCED COMPLEXATION

Description: The Project Team is submitting this Topical Report on the results of its bench-scale demonstration of ElectroChemical Remediation Technologies (ECRTs) and in particular the Induced Complexation (ECRTs-IC) process for remediation of mercury contaminated soils at DOE Complex sites. ECRTs is an innovative, in-situ, geophysically based soil remediation technology with over 50 successful commercial site applications involving remediation of over two million metric tons of contaminated soils. ECRTs-IC has been successfully used to remediate 220 cu m of mercury-contaminated sediments in the Union Canal, Scotland. In that operation, ECRTs-IC reduced sediment total mercury levels from an average of 243 mg/kg to 6 mg/kg in 26 days of operation. The clean up objective was to achieve an average total mercury level in the sediment of 20 mg/kg.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Burks, Barry L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Bias and self-bias of magnetic macroparticle filters for cathodic arc plasmas

Description: Curved magnetic filters are often used for the removal of macroparticles from cathodic arc plasmas. This study addresses the need to further reduce losses and improving plasma throughput. The central figure of merit is the system coefficient Kappa defined as filtered ion current normalized by the plasma-producing arc current. The coefficient Kappa is investigated as a function of DC and pulsed magnetic field operation, magnetic field strength, external electric bias, and arc amplitude. It increases with positive filter bias but saturates at about 15 V for relatively low magnetic field ({approx}10 mT), whereas stronger magnetic fields lead to higher Kappa with saturation at about 25 V. Further increase of positive bias reduces Kappa. These findings are true for both pulsed and DC filters. Bias of pulsed filters has been realized using the voltage drop across a self-bias resistor, eliminating the need for a separate bias circuit. Almost 100 A of filtered copper ions have been obtained in pulse d mode, corresponding to Kappa approximately equal to 0.04. The results are interpreted by a simplified potential trough model.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Byon, Eungsun & Anders, Andre
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Geology of the Western Part of Los Alamos National Laboratory (TA-3 to TA-16), Rio Grande Rift, New Mexico

Description: We present data that elucidate the stratigraphy, geomorphology, and structure in the western part of Los Alamos National Laboratory between Technical Areas 3 and 16 (TA-3 and TA-16). Data include those gathered by geologic mapping of surficial, post-Bandelier Tuff strata, conventional and high-precision geologic mapping and geochemical analysis of cooling units within the Bandelier Tuff, logging of boreholes and a gas pipeline trench, and structural analysis using profiles, cross sections, structure contour maps, and stereographic projections. This work contributes to an improved understanding of the paleoseismic and geomorphic history of the area, which will aid in future seismic hazard evaluations and other investigations. The study area lies at the base of the main, 120-m (400-ft) high escarpment formed by the Pajarito fault, an active fault of the Rio Grande rift that bounds Los Alamos National Laboratory on the west. Subsidiary fracturing, faulting, and folding associated with the Pajarito fault zone extends at least 1,500 m (5,000 ft) to the east of the main Pajarito fault escarpment. Stratigraphic units in the study area include upper units of the Tshirege Member of the early Pleistocene Bandelier Tuff, early Pleistocene alluvial fan deposits that predate incision of canyons on this part of the Pajarito Plateau, and younger Pleistocene and Holocene alluvium and colluvium that postdate drainage incision. We discriminate four sets of structures in the area between TA-3 and TA-16: (a) north-striking faults and folds that mark the main zone of deformation, including a graben in the central part of the study area; (b) north-northwest-striking fractures and rare faults that bound the eastern side of the principal zone of deformation and may be the surface expression of deep-seated faulting; (c) rare northeast-striking structures near the northern limit of the area associated with the southern end of the Rendija Canyon fault; and (d) several …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: C.J.Lewis; A.Lavine; S.L.Reneau; J.N.Gardner; R.Channell & C.W.Criswell
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 326: Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

Description: This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 326, Areas 6 and 27 Release Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Site closure was performed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan (SAFER) Plan for CAU 326 (US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV, 2001]). CAU 326 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 06-25-01, 06-25-02, 06-25-04, and 27-25-01. CAS 06-25-01 is a release site associated with an underground pipeline that carried heating oil from the heating oil underground storage tank (UST), Tank 6-CP-1, located to the west of Building CP-70 to the boiler in Building CP-1 located in the Area 6 Control Point (CP) compound. This site was closed in place administratively by implementing use restrictions. CAS 06-25-02 is a hydrocarbon release associated with an active heating oil UST, Tank 6-DAF-5, located west of Building 500 at the Area 6 Device Assembly Facility. This site was closed in place administratively by implementing use restrictions. CAS 06-25-04 was a hydrocarbon release associated with Tank 6-619-4. This site was successfully remediated when Tank 6-619-4 was removed. No further action was taken at this site. CAS 27-25-01 is an excavation that was created in an attempt to remove hydrocarbon-impacted soil from the Site Maintenance Yard in Area 27. Approximately 53 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (70 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) of soil impacted by total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) was excavated from the site in August of 1994. Clean closure of this site was completed in 2002 by the excavation and disposal of approximately 160 m{sup 3} (210 yd{sup 3}) of PCB-impacted soil.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Campbell, K. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

Description: The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. …
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A REDUCED ORDER MODEL OF TWO-PHASE FLOW, HEAT TRANSFER AND COMBUSTION IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED-BEDS

Description: This report summarizes the objectives, tasks and accomplishments of the second year of this research project. The report presents the following program deliverables: (1) visualization tools for reconstructing simulated data; (2) algorithms for reducing the partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations; and (3) visualization tools for Galerkin ordinary differential equations.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Cizmas, Paul
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The ideal strength of iron in tension and shear

Description: The ideal strength of a material is the stress at which the lattice itself becomes unstable and, hence, sets a firm upper bound on the mechanical strength the material can have. The present paper includes an ab-initio calculation of the ideal shear strength of Fe. It is, to our knowledge, the first such computation for any ferromagnetic material. The paper also elaborates on our earlier calculation of the ideal tensile strength of Fe by studying the effects of strains which break the tetragonal symmetry. The strengths were calculated using the Projector Augmented Wave Method within the framework of density functional theory and the generalized gradient approximation. In <001> tension the ideal strength is determined by an elastic instability of the ferromagnetic phase along the ''Bain'' strain path from bcc to fcc. An <001> tensile strain also leads to instability with respect to transformation into a face centered orthorhombic structure, and to various magnetic instabilities. However, these are encountered at larger strains and, thus, do not affect the ideal strength. We also investigated the ideal shear strength of bcc iron in two prominent shear systems, <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} and <111>{l_brace}110{r_brace}. In both shear systems the ideal strength is determined by the body centered tetragonal structure that defines a nearby saddle point on the energy surface. The ideal shear strengths are thus very similar, though they are not identical since the two shears follow slightly different strain paths from bcc to bct. We investigated the magnetic instabilities encountered during <111>{l_brace}112{r_brace} shear. These instabilities do not appear until the strain is significantly greater than the instability strain of the ferromagnetic crystal. Hence while Fe exhibits some novel effects due to magnetism, they do not affect the ideal strength, which is determined by the same elastic instabilities that determine the strengths of most other bcc metals.
Date: December 1, 2002
Creator: Clatterbuck, D.M.; Chrzan, D.C. & Morris, J. W., Jr.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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