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Sandia National Laboratories' 2002 Green Zia Program Feedback Report

Description: The Green Zia Environmental Excellence Program is a voluntary program designed to support and assist New Mexico businesses to achieve environmental excellence through the development of an environmental management system (EMS). Since 2000, organizations within Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) have participated in the program. SNL's Pollution Prevention (P2) program supports and assists SNL organizations by utilizing Green Zia tools to aid in the implementation of each organization's EMS. This report is based on a feedback session held in September 2002 with past SNL Green Zia Program participants. The goal of the feedback session and of this report is to enhance the services that the P2 Program provides to SNL organizations. This report summarizes the feedback received.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: RICHARDSON, ANASTASIA DAWN
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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CO2 Capture by Absorption With Potassium Carbonate Quarterly Report

Description: The objective of this work is to improve the process for CO{sub 2} capture by alkanolamine absorption/stripping by developing an alternative solvent, aqueous K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} promoted by piperazine. Progress has been made in this reporting period on three subtasks. A simple thermodynamic model has been developed to represent the CO{sub 2} vapor pressure and speciation of the new solvent. A rate model has been formulated to predict the CO{sub 2} flux with these solutions under absorber conditions. A process and instrumentation diagram and process flow diagram have been prepared for modifications of the existing pilot plant system.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Rochelle, Gary T. & Seibert, A. Frank
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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In-Situ, Long-Term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants

Description: This report presents the results of the first phase of the project entitled ''In-situ, Long-term Monitoring System for Radioactive Contaminants.'' Phase one of this effort included four objectives, each with specific success criteria. The first objective was to produce dosimetry grade fibers and rods of aluminum oxide. The success criterion for this milestone was the production of aluminum oxide rods and fibers that have a minimum measurable dose (MMD) of 100 mrem or less. This milestone was completed and the MMD for the rods was measured to be 1.53 mrem. Based on the MMD, the ability of the sensor to measure {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y, and {sup 99}Tc was evaluated. It was determined that the sensor can measure the release limit of these radionuclides (50 pCi/cm{sup 3}) in 150 h, 200 h, and 54,000 h, respectively. The monitor is adequate for measuring {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y but is unsuitable for measuring {sup 99}Tc in soil. The second objective was to construct a prototype sensor (dosimeter and fiber optic channel). There were three success criteria for this milestone: (1) Perform measurements with the sensor for both gamma and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 10% or less; (2) Demonstrate the ability of the sensor to discriminate between gamma and beta radiation; and (3) Obtain similar or relatable results for differing lengths of fiber optic cable. These milestones were met. The sensor was able to measure gamma radiation repeatedly with a standard deviation of 3.15% and beta radiation with a standard deviation of 2.85%. Data is presented that demonstrates that an end cap can be used to discriminate between beta plus gamma radiation using beta radiation from a {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y source, and gamma radiation alone. It is shown that some amount of attenuation occurs in longer fiber …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Durham, James S.; McKeever, Stephen W. S. & Akselrod, Mark S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Recent Developments on the 110 GHz Electron Cyclotron Instatllation on the DIII-D Tokamak

Description: OAK A271 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS ON THE 110 GHZ ELECTRON CYCLOTRON INSTALLATION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Significant improvements are being implement4ed to the capability of the 110 GHz electron cyclotron system on the DIII-D tokamak. Chief among these is the addition of the fifth and sixth 1 MW class gyrotrons, increasing the power available for auxiliary heating and current drive by nearly 60%. These tubes use artificially grown diamond rf output windows to obtain high power with long pulse capability. The beams from these tubes are nearly Gaussian, facilitating coupling to the waveguide. A new fully articulating dual launcher capable of high speed spatial scanning has been designed and tested. The launcher has two axis independent steering for each waveguide. the mirrors can be rotated at up to 100{sup o}/s. A new feedback system linking the DIII-D Plasma Control System (PCS) with the gyrotron beam voltage waveform generators permits real-time feedback control of some plasma properties such as electron temperature. The PCS can use a variety of plasma monitors to generate its control signal, including electron cyclotron emission and Mirnov probes. Electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive (ECH and ECCD) were used during this year's DIII-D experimental campaign to control electron temperature, density, and q profiles, induce an ELM-free H-mode, and suppress the m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode. The new capabilities have expanded the role of EC systems in tokamak plasma control.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Ponce, D.; Callis, R. W.; Cary, W. P.; Ferron, J. R.; Green, M.; Grunloh, H. J. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Physics Prospects with the JLab 12-GeV upgrade

Description: Increasing the beam energy of the CEBAF accelerator to 12 GeV will greatly expand the physics opportunities to explore the nature of strongly interacting matter. The primary thrusts of the experimental program will include the study of quark confinement and the direct exploration of the quark-gluon structure of hadrons and nuclei in the valence-quark region.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Smith, Elton
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Geotechnical Analysis Report for July 1999-June 2000

Description: This Geotechnical Analysis Report (GAR) presents and interprets the geotechnical data from the underground excavations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The data, which are obtained as part of a regular monitoring program, are used to characterize conditions, to compare actual performance to the design assumptions, and to evaluate and forecast the performance of the underground excavations during operations. GARs have been available to the public since 1983. During the Site and Preliminary Design Validation (SPDV) Program, the architect/engineer for the project produced these reports on a quarterly basis to document the geomechanical performance during and immediately after excavation of the underground facility. Since the completion of the construction phase of the project in 1987, the management and operating contractor for the facility has prepared these reports annually. This report describes the performance and condition of selected areas from July 1, 1999, to June 30, 2000. It is divided into ten chapters. The remainder of Chapter 1 provides background information on the WIPP, its mission, and the purpose and scope of the geomechanical monitoring program. Chapter 2 describes the local and regional geology of the WIPP site. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the geomechanical instrumentation located in the shafts and shaft stations, present the data collected by that instrumentation, and provide interpretation of these data. Chapters 5, 6, and 7 present the results of geomechanical monitoring in the three main portions of the WIPP underground facility (the access drifts, the Northern Experimental Area, and the Waste Disposal Area). Chapter 8 discusses the results of the Geoscience Program, which includes fracture mapping, borehole logging, and borehole observations. Chapter 9 provides an assessment of the hydrologic conditions near the Exhaust Shaft. Chapter 10 summarizes the results of the geomechanical monitoring and compares the current excavation performance to the design requirements.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Solutions, Westinghouse TRU
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Carbon Dioxide Capture From Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents Quarterly Technical Progress Report: July-September 2002

Description: The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Green, David A.; Turk, Brian S.; Portzer, Jeffrey W.; P.Gupta, Raghubir; McMichael, William J.; Liang, Ya et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DEEP DESULFURIZATION OF DIESEL FUELS BY A NOVEL INTEGRATED APPROACH

Description: In order to reduce the sulfur level in liquid hydrocarbon fuels for environmental protection and fuel cell applications, deep desulfurization of a model diesel fuel and a real diesel fuel was conducted by our SARS (selective adsorption for removing sulfur) process using the adsorbent A-2. Effect of temperature on the desulfurization process was examined. Adsorption desulfurization at ambient temperature, 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over A-2 is efficient to remove dibenzothiophene (DBT) in the model diesel fuel, but difficult to remove 4-methyldibenzothiophene (4-MDBT) and 4,6-dimethyl-dibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT). Adsorption desulfurization at 150 C over A-2 can efficiently remove DBT, 4-MDBT and 4,6-DMDBT in the model diesel fuel. The sulfur content in the model diesel fuel can be reduced to less than 1 ppmw at 150 C without using hydrogen gas. The adsorption capacity corresponding to the break-through point is 6.9 milligram of sulfur per gram of A-2 (mg-S/g-A-2), and the saturate capacity is 13.7 mg-S/g-A-2. Adsorption desulfurization of a commercial diesel fuel with a total sulfur level of 47 ppmw was also performed at ambient temperature and 24 h{sup -1} of LHSV over the adsorbent A-2. The results show that only part of the sulfur compounds existing in the low sulfur diesel can be removed by adsorption over A-2 at such operating conditions, because (1) the all sulfur compounds in the low sulfur diesel are the refractory sulfur compounds that have one or two alkyl groups at the 4- and/or 6-positions of DBT, which inhibit the approach of the sulfur atom to the adsorption site; (2) some compounds coexisting in the commercial low sulfur diesel probably inhibit the interaction between the sulfur compounds and the adsorbent. Further work in determining the optimum operating conditions and screening better adsorbent is desired.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Ma, Xiaoliang; Sprague, Michael; Sun, Lu & Song, Chunshan
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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NNSA/NV Consequence Management Capabilities for Radiological Emergency Response

Description: The U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) provides an integrated Consequence Management (CM) response capability for the (NNSA) in the event of a radiological emergency. This encompasses planning, technical operations, and home team support. As the lead organization for CM planning and operations, NNSA/NV coordinates the response of the following assets during the planning and operational phases of a radiological accident or incident: (1) Predictive dispersion modeling through the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and the High Consequence Assessment Group at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); (2) Regional radiological emergency assistance through the eight Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) regional response centers; (3) Medical advice and assistance through the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; (4) Aerial radiological mapping using the fixed-wing and rotor-wing aircraft of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS); (5) Consequence Management Planning Teams (CMPT) and Consequence Management Response Teams (CMRT) to provide CM field operations and command and control. Descriptions of the technical capabilities employed during planning and operations are given below for each of the elements comprising the integrated CM capability.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Bowman, D. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DEVELOPMENT OF AN ADVANCED APPROACH FOR NEXT GENERATION, HIGH RESOLUTION, INTEGRATED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

Description: During the third quarter a suitable test site was obtained, data acquired, and the process of data loading and data QC/QA begun. Preliminary data analysis was done in log clustering, seismic interpretation, and engineering model construction. These analysis tasks were continuing at the conclusion of the quarter.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Reeves, Scott R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

Description: Work on the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) mercury spectrometer this past quarter concentrated on the actual detection of mercury and the beginning of flue gas interference testing. After obtaining the initial mercury signal detection was done at various pressures and concentrations. The Alexandrite laser system used for the CRD spectrometer has a narrow enough linewidth to spectrally resolve the isotopic structure of mercury. This includes both isotopic frequency shifts as well as hyperfine splittings due to a couple of the odd isotopes of mercury. Initial flue gas inteferent testing concentrated on SO{sub 2}, which is expected to cause the greatest interference with mercury detection due to its absorption of ultra-violet light in the same region as that of the mercury atomic line.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (Spss) Treatability of Simulated Mixed-Waste Mercury Contaminated Sludge.

Description: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently seeking to validate technologies that can directly treat radioactively contaminated high mercury (Hg) subcategory wastes without removing the mercury from the waste. The Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of several candidate technologies capable of successfully treating various Hg waste streams. To supplement previously supplied data on treatment of soils, EPA needs additional data concerning stabilization of high Hg subcategory waste sludges. To this end, a 5000 ppm sludge surrogate, containing approximately 50 wt% water, was successfully treated by pilot-scale SPSS processing. In two process runs, 85 and 95 wt% of water was recovered from the sludge during processing. At waste loadings of 30 wt% dry sludge, the treated waste form had no detectable mercury (<10 ppb) in TCLP leachates. Data gathered from the demonstration of treatment of this sludge will provide EPA with information to support revisions to current treatment requirements for high Hg subcategory wastes.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Adama, J. W.; Bowerman, B. S. & Kalb, P. D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

Description: In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION AND FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF EXPLORER: A LONG-RANGE UNTETHERED LIVE GASLINE INSPECTION ROBOT SYSTEM

Description: This program is undertaken in order to construct and field-demonstrate EXPLORER, a modular, remotely controllable, self-powered, untethered robot system for the inspection of live gas distribution 150 mm (6- inch) to 200 mm (8-inch) diameter mains. The modular design of the system allows it to accommodate various components intended to accomplish different inspection, repair, sample retrieval, and other in-pipe tasks. The prototype system being built under this project will include all the basic modules needed, i.e. the locomotor, power storage, wireless communication, and camera. The camera, a solid-state fisheye-type, is used to transmit real-time video to the operator that allows for the live inspection of gas distribution pipes. This module, which incorporates technology developed by NASA, has already been designed, constructed and tested, having exceeded performance expectations. The full prototype system will be comprehensively tested in the laboratory followed by two field demonstrations in real applications in NYGAS member utilities' pipes. The system under development significantly advances the state of the art in inspection systems for gas distribution mains, which presently consist of tethered systems of limited range (about 500 ft form the point of launch) and limited inspection views. Also current inspection systems have no ability to incorporate additional modules to expand their functionality. This development program is a joint effort among the New York Gas Group (NYGAS; a trade association of the publicly owned gas utilities in New York State), the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Johnson Space Center (JSC), Carnegie Mellon University's (CMU) National Robotics Engineering Consortium (NREC), and the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The DOE's contribution to this current phase of the project is $499,023 out of a total of $780,735 (not including NASA's contribution). The present report summarizes the accomplishments of the project during its second six …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Vradis, Dr. George C. & Schempf, Dr. Hagen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Gas/Liquid Membranes for Natural Gas Upgrading Quarterly Report: Number 4

Description: Gas Technology Institute (GTI) is conducting this research program whose objective is to develop gas/liquid membranes for natural gas upgrading to assist DOE in achieving their goal of developing novel methods of upgrading low quality natural gas to meet pipeline specifications. Kvaerner Process Systems (KPS) and W. L. Gore & Associates (GORE) gas/liquid membrane contactors are based on expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) membranes acting as the contacting barrier between the contaminated gas stream and the absorbing liquid. These resilient membranes provide much greater surface area for transfer than other tower internals, with packing densities five to ten times greater, resulting in equipment 50-70% smaller and lower weight for the same treating service. The scope of the research program is to (1) build and install a laboratory- and a field-scale gas/liquid membrane absorber; (2) operate the units with a low quality natural gas feed stream for sufficient time to verify the simulation model of the contactors and to project membrane life in this severe service; and (3) conducted an economic evaluation, based on the data, to quantify the impact of the technology. Chevron, one of the major producers of natural gas, has offered to host the test at a gas treating plant. KPS will use their position as a recognized leader in the construction of commercial amine plants for building the unit along with GORE providing the membranes. GTI will provide operator and data collection support during lab- and field-testing to assure proper analytical procedures are used. KPS and GTI will perform the final economic evaluation. GTI will provide project management and be responsible for reporting and interactions with DOE on this project. Efforts this quarter have concentrated on legal agreements, including alternative field sites. Preliminary design of the bench-scale equipment continues.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Meyer, Howard S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

Description: OAK A271 MULTI-MODE ERROR FIELD CORRECTION ON THE DIII-D TOKAMAK. Error field optimization on DIII-D tokamak plasma discharges has routinely been done for the last ten years with the use of the external ''n = 1 coil'' or the ''C-coil''. The optimum level of correction coil current is determined by the ability to avoid the locked mode instability and access previously unstable parameter space at low densities. The locked mode typically has toroidal and poloidal mode numbers n = 1 and m = 2, respectively, and it is this component that initially determined the correction coil current and phase. Realization of the importance of nearby n = 1 mode components m = 1 and m = 3 has led to a revision of the error field correction algorithm. Viscous and toroidal mode coupling effects suggested the need for additional terms in the expression for the radial ''penetration'' field B{sub pen} that can induce a locked mode. To incorporate these effects, the low density locked mode threshold database was expanded. A database of discharges at various toroidal fields, plasma currents, and safety factors was supplement4ed with data from an experiment in which the fields of the n = 1 coil and C-coil were combined, allowing the poloidal mode spectrum of the error field to be varied. A multivariate regression analysis of this new low density locked mode database was done to determine the low density locked mode threshold scaling relationship n{sub e} {proportional_to} B{sub T}{sup -0.01} q{sub 95}{sup -0.79} B{sub pen} and the coefficients of the poloidal mode components in the expression for B{sub pen}. Improved plasma performance is achieved by optimizing B{sub pen} by varying the applied correction coil currents.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: SCOVILLE, JT & LAHAYE, RJ
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Fibrous Monolith Wear Resistant Components for the Mining Industry Semi-Annual Report: Number 3

Description: During the reporting period, work continued on development of formulations using the materials down-selected from the initially identified contenders for the fibrous monolith wear resistant components. The FM systems studied were: WC-Co/WC-Co, WC-Co/Co, diamond/WC-Co, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-TiCN. Extrudable formulations for the materials listed were developed during the first twelve months of this effort, and work during the reporting period was focused on the development of optimized binder removal processes. A two stage binder removal process was developed that resulted in prototype parts free of voids and other internal defects. In addition, changes in the binder removal atmosphere resulted in the apparent elimination of residual carbon, an important consideration when consolidating WC-Co containing systems. Using the improved binder removal processes, parts were consolidated by both sintering and hot pressing to >99% theoretical density. Samples of these materials were sent to Kyocera for mechanical evaluations. Fabrication of drill bit inserts was begun, and binder removal begun during the reporting period. A total of 24 green inserts were fabricated, and will be consolidated and delivered for field testing during the upcoming reporting period.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Rigali, Mark J.; Fulcher, Mike L. & Knittel, Kenneth L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Effects of a carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a microgrid

Description: This paper describes the economically optimal adoption and operation of distributed energy resources (DER) by a hypothetical California microgrid ((mu)Grid) consisting of a group of commercial buildings over an historic test year, 1999. The optimization is conducted using a customer adoption model (DER-CAM) developed at Berkeley Lab and implemented in the General Algebraic Modeling System (GAMS). A (mu)Grid is a semiautonomous grouping of electricity and heat loads interconnected to the existing utility grid (macrogrid) but able to island from it. The (mu)Grid minimizes the cost of meeting its energy requirements (consisting of both electricity and heat loads) by optimizing the installation and operation of DER technologies while purchasing residual energy from the local combined natural gas and electricity utility. The available DER technologies are small-scale generators (< 500 kW), such as reciprocating engines, microturbines, and fuel cells, with or without CHP equipment, such as water- and space-heating and/or absorption cooling. By introducing a tax on carbon emissions, it is shown that if the (mu)Grid is allowed to install CHP-enabled DER technologies, its carbon emissions are mitigated more than without CHP, demonstrating the potential benefits of small-scale CHP technology for climate change mitigation. Reciprocating engines with heat recovery and/or absorption cooling tend to be attractive technologies for the mild southern California climate, but the carbon mitigation tends to be modest compared to purchasing utility electricity because of the predominance of relatively clean generation in California.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Marnay, Chris; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Firestone, Ryan M.; Ghosh, Srijay; Siddidqui, Afzal S. & Stadler, Michael
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The National Energy Technology Laboratory Annual Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2001

Description: No significant environmental problems were identified at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sites in Morgantown (MGN), Pittsburgh (PGH), Tulsa (NPTO) and Fairbanks (AEO) during 2001. No radionuclides were released from the sites during 2001. The sites maintain two major environmental programs: waste management, and environmental media and release management. These two programs encompass waste handling, storage, and disposal, waste minimization and pollution prevention, air quality emissions, surface-water discharges, groundwater impacts, industrial wastewater discharges, and spill control procedures. The Morgantown and Pittsburgh sites currently maintain complete monitoring programs for groundwater, stormwater discharge, laboratory wastewater discharge, and meteorological data. In addition, an annual air emissions inventory is prepared. A comprehensive Directives Program aimed at managing environmental, safety, health requirements, and risks was initiated in 1997, continued through subsequent years, and will be completed in 2003. The primary objective of the program is to identify and implement standards that will protect the health and safety of workers, public, and the environment. This program started with a careful and thorough analysis of risks confronting workers and the communities surrounding NETL sites. Following this analysis, requirements and best management practices were evaluated to determine how requirements could best be used to advance the mission of NETL. Teams of subject-matter experts analyzed the work assigned to determine potential hazards and identify ways to remove or control those hazards. In 2001, NETL developed or revised a series of directives in two major areas: safety analysis and review (SAR) processes, and integrated safety management (ISM) directives. SAR directives were issued for research and development (R&D) operations, support operations, and facilities. ISM directives were released on management processes, such as standards maintenance, performance measures, assessments, corrective actions, lessons-learned, and training. In conjunction with the Directives Program, the use of the voluntary environmental management system, ISO 14001, was evaluated. …
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: National Energy Technology Laboratory (U.S.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Labs21 environmental performance criteria Version 2.0

Description: Laboratory facilities present a unique challenge for energy efficient and sustainable design, with their inherent complexity of systems, health and safety requirements, long-term flexibility and adaptability needs, energy use intensity, and environmental impacts. The typical laboratory is about five times as energy intensive as a typical office building and costs about three times as much per unit area. The Labs21 Environmental Performance Criteria (EPC) is a rating system for use by laboratory building project stakeholders to assess the environmental performance of laboratory facilities. Currently, the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED{trademark} Rating System is the primary tool used. However, LEED{trademark} was designed for U.S. commercial office buildings and as such, lacks some attributes essential to the sustainable design of this unique and complex building type. To facilitate widespread use and to avoid ''re-inventing the wheel'' this effort builds on the existing LEED{trademark} Rating System 2.0.
Date: October 1, 2002
Creator: Mathew, Paul A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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