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2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User's Conference Proceedings (CD)

Description: The 2001 Joint ADVISOR/PSAT Vehicle Systems Modeling User Conference provided an opportunity for engineers in the automotive industry and the research environment to share their experiences in vehicle systems modeling using ADVISOR and PSAT. ADVISOR and PSAT are vehicle systems modeling tools developed and supported by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory respectively with the financial support of the US Department of Energy. During this conference peers presented the results of studies using the simulation tools and improvements that they have made or would like to see in the simulation tools. Focus areas of the presentations included Control Strategy, Model Validation, Optimization and Co-Simulation, Model Development, Applications, and Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis. Attendees were offered the opportunity to give feedback on future model development plans.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Markel, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Measurements of Plutonium in Sediment and Seawater from the Marshall Islands

Description: During the summer 2000, I was given the opportunity to work for about three months as a technical trainee at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, or LLNL as I will refer to it hereafter. University of California runs this Department of Energy laboratory, which is located 70 km east of San Francisco, in the small city of Livermore. This master thesis in Radioecology is based on the work I did here. LLNL, as a second U.S.-facility for development of nuclear weapons, was built in Livermore in the beginning of the 1950's (Los Alamos in New Mexico was the other one). It has since then also become a 'science center' for a number of areas like magnetic and laser fusion energy, non-nuclear energy, biomedicine, and environmental science. The Laboratory's mission has changed over the years to meet new national needs. The following two statements were found on the homepage of LLNL (http://www.llnl.gov), at 2001-03-05, where also information about the laboratory and the scientific projects that takes place there, can be found. 'Our primary mission is to ensure that the nation's nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable and to prevent the spread and use of nuclear weapons worldwide'. 'Our goal is to apply the best science and technology to enhance the security and well-being of the nation and to make the world a safer place.' The Marshall Islands Dose Assessment and Radioecology group at the Health and Ecological Assessments division employed me, and I also worked to some extent with the Centre for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (CAMS) group. The work I did at LLNL can be divided into two parts. In the first part Plutonium (Pu) measurements in sediments from the Rongelap atoll in Marshall Islands, using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) were done. The method for measuring these kinds of samples is …
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Leisvik, M & Hamilton, T
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ADVANCED DATA PROCESSING FOR VOLUMETRIC COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY DATA

Description: Computed tomography (CT) has long been used by industry as a non-destructive evaluation technique for discovering flaws in parts before their use. Traditional linear array computed tomography systems acquired data at a rate that could be reconstructed simultaneously with data acquisition. With new area detectors, the data rate of acquisition has increased exponentially, and the reconstruction algorithm does not scale linearly with increased data. FlashCT DPS (Flat Panel Amorphous Silicon High Resolution Computed Tomography, Data Processing System) is a software package developed by M. Sheats, and A. Davis at LANL to meet the data processing demands of new flat panel array computed tomography. FlashCT--DPS combines several features unique to industrial computed tomography systems. It addresses traditional usability problems by providing an intuitive graphical user interface and powerful analysis tools. It includes the three major CT reconstruction algorithms: parallel backprojection, fan beam resorting, and Feldkamp cone beam. It also provides visualization tools for examination of data after processing. Finally, it is able to perform distributed data reconstruction with a near linear speed increase as a function of the number of processors used. Additionally, utility programs have been developed to support project editing and computing cluster management for the FlashCT system. FlashCT--DPS runs on a standard PC platform and operates well on a variety of processor and memory configurations.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: BERKELEY, M. SHEATS - UC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ADVANCED DIRECT LIQUEFACTION CONCEPTS FOR PETC GENERIC UNITS

Description: The results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments and supporting technical and economic assessments conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91040 are reported for the period April 1, 2001 to June 30 2001. This work involves the introduction into the basic two-stage liquefaction process several novel concepts, which include dispersed lower-cost catalysts, coal cleaning by oil agglomeration, and distillate hydrotreating and dewaxing. This project has been modified to include an investigation into the production of value added materials from coal using low-severity liquefaction based technologies.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Berkovich, Adam J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

Description: This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Chastagner, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Alternative Fuel News: Official Publication of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center; Vol. 5, No. 2

Description: A quarterly magazine with articles the proposed National Energy Policy; the 2001 National Clean Cities Conference including Clean Cities Coalition Award and National Partner Award recipients; station cars (shared my multiple drivers); and new emissions-reducing incentives in Texas.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: LaRocque, T.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Amplitude Modulation of Atomic Wavefunctions - Final Technical Report

Description: This project developed a novel wave function modulation technique. Other modulation techniques use tailored laser pulses to directly excite a time-dependent, modulated wave function from a ground state. Our technique began with one electron already excited to a time independent eigenfunction. Then, by using excitations of a second valence electron, we modulated the other wave function. Our technique had the benefit that it was very efficient, and required low power lasers with no need for precise phase or amplitude control. On the other hand it had the difficulty of being a multi-step laser excitation with a maximum repetition rate of 10 Hz. Over the course of this project, we showed that the technique did work, and work efficiently. However, it was easy to generalize. Since the modulation depended on a difference between electron-electron interactions with the inner electron in a ground or excited state, the efficiency of the modulation was strongly state dependent. For example, we never showed any significant modulation in our tests of barium states, while our strontium measurements did show efficient modulation as long as the state to be modulated was in the 5snd group with n between 30 and 50. We completed some studies of the dependence of the amplitude modulation as we varied the time between the excitation and de-excitation pulses applied to the inner electron. The amplitude of the nearest neighbor states was well described by Multi-Channel Quantum Defect theory, but farther satellites were problematical. This may have simply reflected the low density of measurement points, since the amplitudes of the farther satellites oscillate more quickly with time. As we developed our technique, we showed that we could directly measure autoionization decay rates in the time domain, and that the net effect of a state belonging to a Rydberg series was that exponential decay …
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Cooke, William E.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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ANALYSIS OF COMBINED FWCD AND NBI IN THE DIII-D TOKAMAK

Description: In recent experiments with combined fast wave current drive (FWCD) and deuterium neutral beam injection on the DIII-D tokamak [Luxon and Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)], an enhanced fusion reactivity and fast ion energy content have been observed in the presence of FWCD, with a concomitant low FWCD efficiency [Petty et al., Radio Frequency Power in Plasmas (AIP, New York, 1997), p. 225]. In this paper, we investigate whether high-harmonic ion cyclotron damping could be responsible for the low FWCD efficiency in these experiments, since a number of high-harmonic hydrogen and deuterium cyclotron resonance layers existed in the plasma. The main analysis tool is the ICRF code PION [Eriksson, Hellsten and Willen, Nucl. Fusion 33, 1037 (1993)], modified to allow multiple frequencies simultaneously as was done in the DIII-D experiments. According to the PION modeling, high harmonic damping of fast wave power can give rise to enhanced fusion reactivity and fast ion energy content, which is consistent with the experimental observations.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Mantsinen, M. J.; Petty, C. C.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Mau, T. K.; Pinsker, R. I. & Porkolab, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analytical Solutions for Sequentially Reactive Transport with Different Retardation Factors

Description: Integral transforms have been widely used for deriving analytical solutions for solute transport systems. Often, analytical solutions can only be written in closed form in frequency domains and numerical inverse-transforms have to be involved to obtain semi-analytical solutions in the time domain. For this reason, previously published closed form solutions are restricted either to a small number of species or to the same retardation assumption. In this paper, we applied the solution scheme proposed by Bauer et al. in the time domain. Using available analytical solutions of a single species transport with first-order decay without coupling with its parent species concentration as fundamental solutions, a daughter species concentration can be expressed as a linear function of those fundamental solutions. The implementation of the solution scheme is straight forward and exact analytical solutions are derived for one- and three-dimensional transport systems.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Sun, Y.; Buscheck, T. A.; Mansoor, K. & Lu, X.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Anti-Drug Media Campaign: Aspects of Advertising Contract Mismanaged by the Government; Contractor Improperly Charged Some Costs

Description: Testimony issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "This testimony discusses the Office of National Drug Control Policy's (ONDCP) advertising contract for Phase III of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign. GAO found that the contractor, Ogilvy & Mather, improperly charged the government for some of its labor costs incurred under this contract. Ogivley & Mather submitted time sheets claiming hours that some employees said they did not work on the anti-drug media campaign. In addition, the company made little progress toward restructuring its accounting system to meet government requirements until nearly two years after the contract was awarded. The government poorly managed aspects of the award and administration of the contract. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) should not have awarded this cost-reimbursement contract without determining whether the contractor had an adequate cost accounting system. In addition, HHS should have reviewed the appropriateness of the large amount of money that the technical representative recommended be disallowed from the contractor's invoices, or arranged for an audit of the contract. The technical representative appropriately brought allegations of improper billing to the attention of ONDCP management, but ONDCP management did not take prompt action to investigate the allegations. Because the contract has not yet been audited, the appropriateness of the disallowed charges and Ogilvy's actual incurred costs under this contract remains unknown. This testimony summarized a June report (GAO-01-623)."
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Application of System Dynamics to the Integration of National Laboratory Research and K-12 Education

Description: The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is dedicated to finding solutions to problems related to the environment, energy, economic competitiveness, and national security. In an effort to attract and retain the expertise needed to accomplish these challenges, the INEEL is developing a program of broad educational opportunities that makes continuing education readily available to all laboratory employees, beginning in the K–12 environment and progressing through post-graduate education and beyond. One of the most innovative educational approaches being implemented at the laboratory is the application of STELLA© dynamic learning environments, which facilitate captivating K–12 introductions to the complex energy and environmental challenges faced by global societies. These simulations are integrated into lesson plans developed by teachers in collaboration with INEEL scientists and engineers. This approach results in an enjoyable and involved learning experience, and an especially positive introduction to the application of science to emerging problems of great social and environmental consequence.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Mills, James Ignatius & Zounar Harbour, Elda D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: The Next Chapter

Description: This report discusses the ongoing debate about whether or not to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) for energy development. The report discusses arguments for and against such development and focuses especially on related pieces of legislation that directly affects the future of the ANWR.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Corn, M. Lynne; Gelb, Bernard A. & Baldwin, Pamela
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

Description: ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT motif structural framework. Thus, we propose here that the ARTT motif represents an experimentally testable general recognition motif region for many ADP-ribosyltransferases and thereby potentially provides a unified structural understanding of substrate recognition in ADP-ribosylation processes.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Han, S. & Tainer, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Avian Collisions with Wind Turbines: A Summary of Existing Studies and Comparisons to Other Sources of Avian Collision Mortality in the United States

Description: It has been estimated that from 100 million to well over 1 billion birds are killed annually in the United States due to collisions with human-made structures, including vehicles, buildings and windows, powerlines, communication towers, and wind turbines. Although wind energy is generally considered environmentally friendly (because it generates electricity without emitting air pollutants or greenhouse gases), the potential for avian fatalities has delayed and even significantly contributed to blocking the development of some windplants in the U.S. Given the importance of developing a viable renewable source of energy, the objective of this paper is to put the issue of avian mortality associated with windpower into perspective with other sources of avian collision mortality across the U.S. The purpose of this paper is to provide a detailed summary of the mortality data collected at windplants and put avian collision mortality associated with windpower development into perspective with other significant sources of avian collision mortality across the United States. We provide a summary of data collected at many of the U.S. windplants and provide annual bird fatality estimates and projections for all wind turbines in the U.S. For comparison, we also review studies of avian collision mortality from other major human-made structures and report annual bird fatality estimates for these sources. Other sources also significantly contribute to overall avian mortality. For example, the National Audubon Society estimates avian mortality due to house cats at 100 million birds per year. Pesticide use, oil spills, disease, etc., are other significant sources of unintended avian mortality. Due to funding constraints, the scope of this paper is limited to examining only avian mortality resulting from collisions with human-made obstacles.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Wallace P. Erickson, Gregory D. Johnson, M. Dale Strickland, David P. Young, Jr., Karyn J. Sernka, Rhett E. Good
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Bull Trout Life History, Genetics, Habitat Needs, and Limiting Fact in Central and Northeast Oregon. Annual Report 1999.

Description: This section describes work accomplished in 1999 that continued to address two objectives of this project. These objectives are (1) determine the distribution of juvenile and adult bull trout Salvelinus confluentus and habitats associated with that distribution, and (2) determine fluvial and resident bull trout life history patterns. Completion of these objectives is intended through studies of bull trout in the Grande Ronde, Walla Walla, and John Day basins. These basins were selected because they provide a variety of habitats, from relatively degraded to pristine, and bull trout populations were thought to vary from relatively depressed to robust. In all three basins we used radio telemetry to determine the seasonal movements of bull trout. In the John Day and Walla Walla basins we also used traps to capture migrant bull trout. With these traps, we intended to determine the timing of bull trout movements both upstream and downstream, determine the relative abundance, size and age of migrant fish, and capture bull trout to be implanted with radio transmitters. In the John Day basin, we captured adult and juvenile bull trout from the upper John Day River and its tributaries, Call Creek, Reynolds Creek, and Roberts Creek. In the Walla Walla basin, we captured adult and juvenile bull trout from Mill Creek.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Hemmingsen, Alan R.; Gunckel, Stephanie L. & Howell, Philip J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Calculation of Chemical Detonation Waves With Hydrodynamics and Thermochemical Equation of State

Description: We model detonation waves for solid explosives, using 2-D Arbitrary Lagrange Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics, with an equation of state (EOS) based on thermochemical equilibrium, coupled with simple kinetic rate laws for a few reactants. The EOS for the product species is based on either a BKWC EOS or on an exponential-6 potential model, whose parameters are fitted to a wide range of shock Hugoniot and static compression data. We show some results for the non ideal explosive, urea nitrate. Such a model is a powerful tool for studying such processes as initiation, detonation wave propagation and detonation wave propagation as a function of cylindrical radius.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Souers, P C & Vitello, P A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Can Recent Charge Fluctuation Calculations Be a Reliable Signal for a QGP at RHIC?

Description: The recent papers of Jeon and Koch[l] and Asakawa, Heinz and Muller[2] propose that the event by event fluctuations of the ratio of the positively charged and negatively charged pions could provide a distinct signal for a QGP at RHIC/LHC due to differences in those from the QGP phase, and the Hadron Gas Phase. In this paper we point out that aside from the questionability of the many assumptions in the treatment used, even following their approach there are other effects not considered, e.g. color charge fluctuations which we show could significantly or completely wash out the proposed signal. Therefore lack of observation of these charge fluctuation signals cannot lead one to conclude that a QGP is not formed at RHIC. A general discussion of experimental requirements for observation of such signals (if they exist) and how to interpret them is included.
Date: August 1, 2001
Creator: Lindenbaum, S. J. & Longacre, R. S.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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