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Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

Description: Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi ...
Date: March 20, 2008
Creator: Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; Fernando, Sandun; Li, Tingyu; Braasch, Dwane; Silva, Juan et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Center for Catalysis at Iowa State University

Description: The overall objective of this proposal is to enable Iowa State University to establish a Center that enjoys world-class stature and eventually enhances the economy through the transfer of innovation from the laboratory to the marketplace. The funds have been used to support experimental proposals from interdisciplinary research teams in areas related to catalysis and green chemistry. Specific focus areas included: • Catalytic conversion of renewable natural resources to industrial materials • Development of new catalysts for the oxidation or reduction of commodity chemicals • Use of enzymes and microorganisms in biocatalysis • Development of new, environmentally friendly reactions of industrial importance These focus areas intersect with barriers from the MYTP draft document. Specifically, section 2.4.3.1 Processing and Conversion has a list of bulleted items under Improved Chemical Conversions that includes new hydrogenation catalysts, milder oxidation catalysts, new catalysts for dehydration and selective bond cleavage catalysts. Specifically, the four sections are: 1. Catalyst development (7.4.12.A) 2. Conversion of glycerol (7.4.12.B) 3. Conversion of biodiesel (7.4.12.C) 4. Glucose from starch (7.4.12.D) All funded projects are part of a soybean or corn biorefinery. Two funded projects that have made significant progress toward goals of the MYTP draft document are: Catalysts to convert feedstocks with high fatty acid content to biodiesel (Kraus, Lin, Verkade) and Conversion of Glycerol into 1,3-Propanediol (Lin, Kraus). Currently, biodiesel is prepared using homogeneous base catalysis. However, as producers look for feedstocks other than soybean oil, such as waste restaurant oils and rendered animal fats, they have observed a large amount of free fatty acids contained in the feedstocks. Free fatty acids cannot be converted into biodiesel using homogeneous base-mediated processes. The CCAT catalyst system offers an integrated and cooperative catalytic system that performs both esterification (of free fatty acids) and transesterification (of soybean oil) in a one-pot fashion. ...
Date: October 17, 2006
Creator: Kraus, George A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Results of the 2007 B100 Quality Survey

Description: In a 2007 analysis of samples from 52% of U.S. biodiesel (B100) producers, 90% met ASTM and other specifications for critical engine performance properties and for elements that harm emission controls.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Alleman, T. L. & McCormick, R. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination

Description: The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was ...
Date: February 26, 2007
Creator: Arnold, William A. & Cussler, Edward L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Top Value Added Chemicals From Biomass: I. Results of Screening for Potential Candidates from Sugars and Synthesis Gas

Description: This report identifies twelve building block chemicals that can be produced from sugars via biological or chemical conversions. The twelve building blocks can be subsequently converted to a number of high-value bio-based chemicals or materials. Building block chemicals, as considered for this analysis, are molecules with multiple functional groups that possess the potential to be transformed into new families of useful molecules. The twelve sugar-based building blocks are 1,4-diacids (succinic, fumaric and malic), 2,5-furan dicarboxylic acid, 3-hydroxy propionic acid, aspartic acid, glucaric acid, glutamic acid, itaconic acid, levulinic acid, 3-hydroxybutyrolactone, glycerol, sorbitol, and xylitol/arabinitol. In addition to building blocks, the report outlines the central technical barriers that are preventing the widespread use of biomass for products and chemicals.
Date: November 1, 2004
Creator: Werpy, Todd A.; Holladay, John E. & White, James F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Final Project Report Project 10749-4.2.2.1 2007-2009

Description: This is the final report for the DOE Project 10749-4.2.2.1 for the FY2007 - FY2009 period. This report is non-proprietary, and will be submitted to DOE as a final project report. The report covers activities under the DOE Project inside CRADA 269 (Project 53231) as well as project activites outside of that CRADA (Project 56662). This is the final report that is summarized from the non-proprietary quarterlies submitted to DOE over the past 2.5 years, which in turn are summaries from the proprietary technical reporting to UOP.
Date: May 11, 2009
Creator: Zacher, Alan H.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Frye, J. G.; Brown, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M. & Oberg, Aaron A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report

Description: The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing ...
Date: October 31, 2012
Creator: ROberts, William L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DEMONSTRATION OF MIXING AND TRANSFERRING SETTLING COHESIVE SLURRY SIMULANTS IN THE AY-102 TANK

Description: In support of Hanford's waste certification and delivery of tank waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by the Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring tank waste in a Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. The work discussed in this report (Phase III) address the impacts cohesive simulants have on mixing and batch transfer performance. The objective of the demonstrations performed in Phase III was to determine the impact that cohesive particle interactions in the simulants have on tank mixing using 1/22{sup nd} scale mixing system and batch transfer of seed particles. This testing is intended to provide supporting evidence to the assumption that Hanford Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) testing in water is conservative. The batch transfers were made by pumping the simulants from the Mixing Demonstration Tank (MDT) to six Receipt Tanks (RTs), and the consistency in the amount of seed particles in each batch was compared. Tests were conducted with non-Newtonian cohesive simulants with Bingham yield stress ranging from 0.3 Pa to 7 Pa. Kaolin clay and 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles were used for all the non-Newtonian simulants. To specifically determine the role of the yield stress on mixing and batch transfer, tests were conducted with a Newtonian mixture of glycerol and water with at viscosity of 6.2 cP that was selected to match the Bingham consistency (high shear rate viscosity) of the higher yield stress kaolin slurries. The water/glycerol mixtures used the same 100 {mu}m stainless steel seed particles. For the transfer demonstrations in Phase III, the mixer jet pumps were operated either at 10.0 gpm (28 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.63 ft{sup 2}/s) or 8.0 gpm (22.4 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.504 ft{sup 2}/s). ...
Date: August 4, 2011
Creator: Adamson, D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

Description: An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20–25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.
Date: April 1, 2003
Creator: Peterson, Eric S.; Trudeau, Jessica; Cleary, Bill; Hackett, Michael & Greene, William A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Low-rank coal thermal properties and diffusivity: Final report

Description: This project developed techniques for measuring thermal properties and mass diffusivities of low-rank coals and coal powders. Using the concept of volume averaging, predictive models have been developed for these porous media properties. The Hot Wire Method was used for simultaneously measuring the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of both consolidated and unconsolidated low-rank coals. A new computer-interfaced experiment is presented and sample container designs developed for both coal powders and consolidated coals. A new mathematical model, based upon volume averaging, is presented for the prediction of these porous media properties. Velocity and temperature effects on liquid-phase dispersion through unconsolidated coal were determined. Radioactive tracer data were used to determine mass diffusivities. A new predictive mathematical model is presented based upon volume averaging. Vapor-phase diffusivity measurements of organic solvents in consolidated lignite coal are reported. An unsteady-state pressure response experiment with microcomputed-based data acquisition was developed to estimate dispersion coefficients through consolidated lignite coals. The mathematical analysis of the pressure response data provides the dispersion coefficient and the adsorption coefficient. 48 refs., 59 figs., 17 tabs.
Date: June 1, 1987
Creator: Ramirez, W.F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Integrated Investigation on the Production and Fate of Organo-Cr(III) Complexes from Microbial Reduction of Chromate

Description: The screening of different genera of bacteria for production of soluble Cr(III) complexes has been completed. A total of eight organisms were screened for production of soluble Cr(III); three were Gram positive and five were Gram negative. The Gram positive bacteria were Cellulomonas sp. ES 6, Rhodococcus sp., and Leafsonia sp., while Shewanella. oneidensis MR 1, Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20, D. vulgaris Hildenborough, Pseudomonas putida MK 1 and Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1 were Gram negative. S. oneidensis MR 1 and Cellulomonas sp ES 6 were grown in minimal media, GWM (Ground Water Medium with lactate/fumarate) and SGM (Simulated Groundwater Medium with sucrose), respectively. Other bacteria were screened under non-growth conditions with sucrose, lactate, or glycerol as electron donor. All experiments were carried out for a period of 15-30 days, with different organisms reaching a maximum soluble Cr(III) concentrations at different times: S. oneidensis, 2d; Cellulomonas sp., 8d; Leafsonia, 6d; Rhodococcus, 9d; Ps. putida MK 1, 6d, Ps. aeruginosa PAO 1, 3d; D. vulgaris Hildenborough, 3d; and D. desulfuricans G20, 21d. Initial characterization indicates that the soluble Cr(III) fraction produced by both S. oneidensis MR 1 and Cellulomonas sp. ES 6 passes through a 1-Kd cut off filter.
Date: June 1, 2004
Creator: Xun, Luying
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Rheological properties essential for the atomization of Coal Water Slurries (CWS). Final report, September 1, 1991--July 31, 1995

Description: The objective of this study was to understand the effect of low shear, high shear rheology, viscoelastic, and extensional properties on the atomization of CWS. In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays were determined at various air-to-CWS ratios using a Malvern 2600 particle size analyzer and a Delavan Solid Cone Atomizing Nozzle. Solids-loading, coal particle size distributions, and chemical additives were varied in order to determine the significant properties that influence CWS atomization. A correlation of the mass mean droplet size with high shear, viscoelastic and extensional behaviors were made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on CWS atomization.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the effect of coal particle sizes on the interfacial and rheological properties of coal-water slurry fuels. Quarterly report No. 2, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

Description: Experiments have been performed to simulate the effects of high viscosity and surface tension of CWS fuel on its atomization. Aqueous solutions of glycerol simulated the high viscosity condition of CWS fuels and ethanol solutions allowed to separately investigate the effect of surface tension. A Fraunhofer diffraction particle sizing technique measured the spatial distribution of Sauter mean diameters (SMDs) for the cross injecting sprays which were previously described in the Quarterly Report No. 1. Experimentally determined parametric correlations reveals the dependence of the spray SMDs on the liquid viscosity, surface tension, the air flow rate, the liquid flow rate, the orifice nozzle diameter, and the measurement locations. This simulated correlation will provide important guidelines for the actual CWS spray experiment to be performed in the successive quarter.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Kihm, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Investigation of the effect of coal particle sizes on the interfacial and rheological properties of coal-water slurry fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996

Description: A new sonic airblast atomization system has been designed and constructed to use in atomizing CWS fuels with two to three orders of magnitude higher viscosity values than water. Preliminary studies show that the new system successfully atomizes a glycerol/water solution that is one hundred times more viscous than pure water. This system, together with a constant displacement feed pump, will allow the study of CWS atomization under various surface tension properties, different coal loadings and particle sizes, and different surfactants. 4 figs., 1 tab.
Date: August 1, 1996
Creator: Kihm, K.D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Measurement of extensional viscosity using the falling drop technique. Final report, October 27, 1992--September 27, 1996

Description: In the falling drop technique, a drop is formed by slowly extruding a liquid downward through a small tube. The drop eventually falls, and fluid adheres to both the tube and the drop, creating a distinct extending fiber. Extensional viscosity may be determined by measuring the dimensions of the fiber as it extends. The flow of fluid in a falling drop has been modeled in order to determine extensional viscosity by measuring the extending fiber. A falling drop rheometer was built, and fiber dimensions were measured using two digital cameras and an image processing system. Extensional viscosity was measured for various solutions of glycerol, xanthan gum, and water. The falling drop technique proved to be an effective extensional rheometer for a range of solution concentrations. 6 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.
Date: February 1, 1998
Creator: Jones, D.K. & Wildman, D.J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

Description: The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air-to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During the past quarter, the experimental data obtained from the previous quarter on pressure dependent atomization of coal-water slurries and simulated fluids glycerol-water and glycerol-xanthum gum, were analyzed. The spray data for the glycerol-water and glycerol-xantham gum solution are as shown in Figures 3 and 4. The plots indicate that the Sauter mean diameter (SMD) increase with decrease in Air/Fuel (AFR). Comparison of Figures 3 and 4 indicate that the addition of the xantham gum to the glycerol solution increases the SMD values especially in the low AFR regime. Figure 5 compares SMD data as a function of AFR for the CWS samples under study. The data indicate that the beneficiated CWS samples atomized well, and that the SMD values obtained at all AFR were smaller than the run-off mine CWS sample.
Date: December 31, 1995
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Effect of coal beneficiation process on rheology/atomization of coal water slurries. Quarterly progress report, November 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

Description: The overall objective of this project is to perform experiments to understand the effect of coal beneficiation processes and high shear rheological properties on the atomization of coal-water slurries (CWS). In the atomization studies, the mean drop size of the CWS sprays will be determined at various air to CWS. A correlation between the high shear rheological properties, particle size distributions and the atomization will be made in order to determine the influence of these parameters on the atomization of CWS. During this past quarter, the atomization data obtained from the previous quarters were analyzed using a model equation that had previously been developed during the course of this work. The analysis demonstrates that there are two possible mechanisms for the breakup of the CWS. The first term of the equation is due to competition between surface tension forces and aerodynamic shearing force and the second term is due the competition between viscosity forces and surface tension force.
Date: October 1, 1995
Creator: Ohene, F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

High Activity catalysts for Polyols Production From C-6 Sugars

Description: Over the course of this project, many significant discoveries have been made in the process for the conversion of sorbitol to value added products. The object was developing a process for the production of propylene glycol (PG), ethylene glycol (EG), and glycerol from sorbitol.
Date: May 6, 2003
Creator: Werpy, Todd; Zacher, Alan; Frye, John; Peterson, Keith; Neuenschwander, Gary; Alderson, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Membrane Process for Recycling Die Lube from Wastewater Solutions

Description: An active-surface membrane technology was used to separate a die lube manufacturing wastewater stream consisting of various oils, hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and silicones. The ultrafiltration membranes reduced organics from initial oil and grease contents by 20�25X, carbon oxygen demand (COD) by 1.5 to 2X, and total organic carbon (TOC) by 0.6, while the biological oxygen demand (BOD) remained constant. The active-surface membranes were not fouled as badly as non-active-surface systems and the active-surface membrane flux levels were consistently higher and more stable than those of the non-active-surface membranes tested. Field testing demonstrated that the rotary microfilter can concentrate the die lube, i.e. remove the glycerin component, and produce a die lube suitable for recycling. The recycling system operated for six weeks with only seven cleaning cycles and no mechanical or electrical failures. Test data and quality records indicate that the die casting scrap was reduced from 8.4 to 7.8%. There is no doubt that this test yielded tremendous results. This separation process presents significant opportunities that can be evaluated further.
Date: April 30, 2003
Creator: Peterson, E.S.; Trudeau, J.; Cleary, B.; Hackett, M. & Greene, W.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

DWPF Melter Air-Lift Bubbler: Physical Testing with Glycerin

Description: The objectives of the Airlift Bubbler Physical Testing are to investigate the flow characteristics of the bubbler as an aid to finalize the prototype bubbler design.
Date: February 10, 2003
Creator: Guerrero, H.N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

(Gamma scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation)

Description: This report discusses: quasielastic scattering studies on glycerol; gamma-ray scattering from alkali halides; lattice dynamics in metals; Moessbauer neutron scattering, x-ray diffraction, and macroscopic studies of high {Tc} superconductors containing tungsten; NiAl scattering studies; and atomic interference factors and nuclear Casimir effect.
Date: January 1, 1992
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerated atomization of coal-water slurry fuels

Description: In order to observe the effects of rheology on the atomization of highly viscous non-Newtonian liquids, glycerin-water solutions and cellulose-glycerin-water solutions have been atomized. In this series of tests, nozzle pressure, air-liquid ratio and liquid viscosity were altered, and the effects were observed. 14 figs.
Date: September 30, 1988
Creator: Buckner, H.N.; Sojka, P.E. & Lefebvre, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerated atomization of coal water slurry

Description: In order to better understand the process of slurry atomization, it is important to observe the influence of fluid non-Newtonian rheological behavior on the spray formation process. As a first step, glycerin-water solutions have been atomized. This report describes findings of photographs taken during atomization. 19 figs.
Date: January 5, 1989
Creator: Buckner, H.N.; Sojka, P.E. & Lefebvre, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Aerated atomization of coal-water slurry fuels

Description: Despite the body of work describing the performance of effervescent atomizers, its potential for use with coal water slurries (CWS) had not been evaluated prior to this study. This programs was therefore undertaken: to demonstrate that effervescent atomization can produce CWS sprays with mean drop sizes below 50 {mu}m; to determine a lower size limit for effervescent atomizer produced CWS sprays; to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for the formation of effervescent atomizer produced sprays. This report describes results of a mathematical analysis in order to better understand physical phenomena involved. 12 figs.
Date: April 1, 1989
Creator: Buckner, H.N.; Sojka, P.E. & Lefebvre, A.H.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department