Search Results

3-D Force-balanced Magnetospheric Configurations

Description: The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has however eluded the community, as most in-situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations by either (a) mapping observed data (e.g., in the ionosphere) along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model or (b) computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D) or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D) that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3D code, that solves the 3-D force balance equation J x B = (upside-down delta) P computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as B = (upside-down delta) psi x (upside-down delta) alpha. The pressure distribution, P = P(psi,alpha), is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for y surfaces are imposed using empirical field models. Our results provide 3-D distributions of magnetic field and plasma pressure as well as parallel and transverse currents for both quiet-time and disturbed magnetospheric conditions.
Date: February 10, 2003
Creator: Zaharia, Sorin; Cheng, C. Z. & Maezawa, K.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

3-D Seismic Methods for Geothermal Reservoir Exploration and Assessment--Summary

Description: A wide variety of seismic methods covering the spectrum from DC to kilohertz have been employed at one time or the other in geothermal environments. The reasons have varied from exploration for a heat source to attempting to find individual fractures producing hot fluids. For the purposes here we will assume that overall objective of seismic imaging is for siting wells for successful location of permeable pathways (often fracture permeability) that are controlling flow and transport in naturally fractured reservoirs. The application could be for exploration of new resources or for in-fill/step-out drilling in existing fields. In most geothermal environments the challenge has been to separate the ''background'' natural complexity and heterogeneity of the matrix from the fracture/fault heterogeneity controlling the fluid flow. Ideally one not only wants to find the fractures, but the fractures that are controlling the flow of the fluids. Evaluated in this work is current state-of-the-art surface (seismic reflection) and borehole seismic methods (Vertical Seismic Profiling (VSP), Crosswell and Single Well) to locate and quantify geothermal reservoir characteristics. The focus is on active methods; the assumption being that accuracy is needed for successful well siting. Passive methods are useful for exploration and detailed monitoring for in-fill drilling, but in general the passive methods lack the precision and accuracy for well siting in new or step out areas. In addition, MEQ activity is usually associated with production, after the field has been taken to a mature state, thus in most cases it is assumed that there is not enough MEQ activity in unproduced areas to accurately find the permeable pathways. The premise of this review is that there may new developments in theory and modeling, as well as in data acquisition and processing, which could make it possible to image the subsurface in much more detail than ...
Date: July 14, 2003
Creator: Majer, E.L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

10 kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

Description: The program is organized into three developmental periods. In Phase 1 the team will develop and demonstrate a proof-of-concept prototype design and develop a manufacturing plan to substantiate potential producibility at a target cost level of $800/kW factory manufacturing cost. Phase 2 will further develop the design and reduce the manufacturing cost to a level of $600 kW. Depending on an assessment of the maturity of the technology at the end of Phase 1, Phase 2 may be structured and supplemented to provide a limited production capability. Finally, in Phase 3, a full Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program will be integrated into the SECA program to develop a mass-producible design at a factory cost of $400/kW with full cross-functional support for unrestricted commercial sales. The path to market for new technology products in the Cummins system involves two processes. The first is called Product Preceding Technology, or PPT. The PPT process provides a methodology for exploring potentially attractive technologies and developing them to the point that they can be reliably scheduled into a new product development program with a manageable risk to the product introduction schedule or product quality. Once a technology has passed the PPT gate, it is available to be incorporated into a Value Package Introduction (VPI) Program. VPI is the process that coordinates the cross-functional development of a fully supported product. The VPI Program is designed to synchronize efforts in engineering, supply, manufacturing, marketing, finance, and product support areas in such a way that the product, when introduced to the market, represents the maximum value to the customer.
Date: August 1, 2003
Creator: Norrick, Dan; Palmer, Brad; Romine, Todd; Vesely, Charles; Barringer, Eric; DeBellis, Cris et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

16-APR-03 Final Release of ENDF/B-V for use with LLNL Codes

Description: The new data files were prepared in two steps. First, the ENDF/B-V database was translated to an ENDL-format ascii database. The ENDL ascii format is a point-wise tabular storage scheme where intermediate values are extracted via interpolation. Sufficient point-wise information was generated in the translation to insure an extraction tolerance of 0.1% for most of the data. The only exception is along the incident neutron energy axis of the outgoing particle energy probability density function where a 0.5% tolerance was maintained. Second, processed files were generated from the translated database. Since the translated ENDF/B-V data is in ENDL-format, the standard processing codes were used to generate the new processed data files. To the best of our knowledge, these processed data files are accurate representations of the ENDF/B-V database to within the stated tolerances. However, there are several issues that users must be aware of and they are listed in this report.
Date: April 16, 2003
Creator: Hill, T S; McNabb, D P; Hedstrom, G W; Beck, B & Hagmann, C A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

21-PWR Waste Package Side and End Impacts

Description: The objective of this calculation is to determine the structural response of a 21-Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel waste package impacting an unyielding surface. A range of initial velocities and initial angles between the waste package and the unyielding surface is studied. The scope of this calculation is limited to estimating the area of the outer shell (OS) where the residual stress exceeds a given limit (hereafter ''damaged area''). The stress limit is defined as a fraction of the yield strength of the OS material, Alloy 22 (SB-575 N06022), at the appropriate temperature. The design of the 21-PWR waste package used in this calculation is that defined in Reference 8. However, a value of 4 mm was used for the gap between the inner shell and the OS, and the thickness of the OS was reduced by 2 mm. The sketch in Attachment I provides additional information not included in Reference 8. All obtained results are valid for this design only. This calculation is associated with the waste package design and was performed by the Specialty Analyses and Waste Package Design Section. The waste package (i.e. uncanistered spent nuclear fuel disposal container) is classified as Quality Level 1.
Date: February 27, 2003
Creator: Delabrosse, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-Channel Geophone Array for Horizontal or Vertical Boreholes: Final Report

Description: Improved ground-imaging capabilities have enormous potential to increase energy, environmental, and economic benefits by improving exploration accuracy and reducing energy consumption during the mining cycle. Seismic tomography has been used successfully to monitor and evaluate geologic conditions ahead of a mining face. A primary limitation to existing seismic tomography, however, is the placement of sensors. The goal of this project is to develop an array of 24 seismic sensors capable of being mounted in either a vertical or horizontal borehole. Development of this technology reduces energy usage in excavation, transportation, ventilation, and processing phases of the mining operation because less waste is mined and the mining cycle suffers fewer interruptions. This new technology benefits all types of mines, including metal/nonmetal, coal, and quarrying. The primary research tasks focused on sensor placement method, sensor housing and clamping design, and cabling and connector selection. An initial design is described in the report. Following assembly, a prototype was tested in the laboratory as well as at a surface stone quarry. Data analysis and tool performance were used for subsequent design modifications. A final design is described, of which several components are available for patent application. Industry partners have shown clear support for this research and demonstrated an interest in commercialization following project completion.
Date: October 24, 2003
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-Channel Geophone Array for Horizontal or Vertical Boreholes Quarterly Technical Report: April-June 2003

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. No work was completed during this reporting period as project personnel are waiting for the mine to become available for final field testing of the array. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: July 1, 2003
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-Channel Geophone Array for Horizontal or Vertical Boreholes Quarterly Technical Report: January-March 2003

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: June 1, 2003
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

24-Channel Geophone Array for Horizontal or Vertical Boreholes Quarterly Technical Report: July-September 2002

Description: This report describes the technical progress on a project to design and construct a multichannel geophone array that improves tomographic imaging capabilities in both surface and underground mines. Especially important in the design of the array is sensor placement. One issue related to sensor placement is addressed in this report: the method for clamping the sensor once it is emplaced in the borehole. If the sensors (geophones) are not adequately coupled to the surrounding rock mass, the resulting data will be of very poor quality. Improved imaging capabilities will produce energy, environmental, and economic benefits by increasing exploration accuracy and reducing operating costs.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Westman, Erik C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

40 Years of Discovery

Description: History is most interesting when seen through the eyes of those who lived it. In this 40th anniversary retrospective of bioscience research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we've asked 19 scientists to share their personal recollections about a major accomplishment in the program's history. We have not tried to create a comprehensive or seamless story. Rather, we've attempted to capture the perspectives of key individuals, each of whom worked on a research program that met significant milestones. We have focused particularly on programs and accomplishments that have shaped the current Biology and Biotechnology Research Program (BBRP). In addition, we have included a timeline of biosciences at LLNL, a history of the directorate that appeared in the Laboratory's magazine, ''Science & Technology Review'', in 2002, and a list of bioscience-related articles that have appeared over the years in ''Science & Technology Review and its predecessor, Energy & Technology Review''. The landscape of biological science today is stunningly different from 40 years ago. When LLNL bioscience began in 1963, we knew about the structure of DNA and that it was the carrier of genetic information. However, it would be another year before scientists would understand how DNA codes for the production of proteins and more than a decade before the earliest DNA sequence would be known. It is sometimes difficult to remember that it was only 15 years ago that the polymerase chain reaction, a synthetic method to amplify pieces of DNA was developed, and that only within the last half-dozen years has sequence data for entire organisms begun to be available. In this publication, we have tried to capture some of the landmark and seminal research history: radiation effects studies, which were a major reason for founding the biological research program, and flow sorting and chromosome painting, which dramatically changed our ...
Date: July 8, 2003
Creator: Heller, Arnie; Henke, Amy; Weinstein, Bert & Thomas, Cindy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

60 years of great science [Oak Ridge National Laboratory]

Description: This issue highlights Oak Ridge National Laboratory's contributions in more than 30 areas of research and related activities during the past 60 years and provides glimpses of current activities that are carrying on this heritage.
Date: January 1, 2003
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

94-1 R&D Program Annual Operating Plan

Description: The 94-1 R&D Program focuses on developing the technical basis for stabilizing and safely storing plutonium-bearing materials. To address these issues, we have in place a material identification and stabilization project, a surveillance and monitoring project, and a management team.
Date: September 1, 2003
Creator: Mason, Richard E. & Dominguez, Pamela D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

94-1 R&D program annual operating plan: Fiscal Year 2003

Description: The 94-1 R&D Program focuses on developing the technical basis for stabilizing and safely storing plutonium-bearing materials. To address these issues, we have in place a material identification and stabilization project, a surveillance and monitoring project, and a management team.
Date: September 1, 2003
Creator: Mason, Richard E. & Dominguez, Pamela D.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

AN-102 Simulant Sr/TRU Precipitation and Ultrafiltration

Description: The objective of these tests was to gather data on performance of the single-tube crossflow ultrafilter unit to de-water the simulant precipitate derived from a project approved tank 241-AN-102 simulant. Upon completion of the objectives with the approved R1 simulant, the simulant specification was changed and additional work at modified precipitation conditions was requested.
Date: April 28, 2003
Creator: Zamecnik, J.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

Description: The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.
Date: January 1, 2003
Creator: Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun & Czapka, Stephen
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

10kW SOFC POWER SYSTEM COMMERCIALIZATION

Description: Participants in the SECA 10 kW SOFC Power System Commercialization project include Cummins Power Generation (CPG), the power generation arm of Cummins, Inc., SOFCo-EFS Holdings, LLC (formerly McDermott Technology, Inc.), the fuel cell and fuel processing research and development arm of McDermott International Inc., M/A-COM, the Multi-Layer Ceramics (MLC) processing and manufacturing arm of Tyco Electronics, and Ceramatec, a materials technology development company. CPG functions in the role of prime contractor and system integrator. SOFCo-EFS is responsible for the design and development of the hot box assembly, including the SOFC stack(s), heat exchanger(s), manifolding, and fuel reformer. M/A-COM and SOFCo-EFS are jointly responsible for development of the MLC manufacturing processes, and Ceramatec provides technical support in materials development. In October 2002, McDermott announced its intention to cease operations at McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) as of December 31, 2002. This decision was precipitated by several factors, including the announced tentative settlement of the B&W Bankruptcy which would result in all of the equity of B&W being conveyed to a trust, thereby eliminating McDermott's interest in the company, and the desire to create a separate fuel cell entity to facilitate its commercial development. The new fuel cell entity is named SOFCo-EFS Holdings, LLC. All of McDermott's solid oxide fuel cell and fuel processing work will be conducted by SOFCo-EFS, using personnel previously engaged in that work. SOFCo-EFS will continue to be located in the Alliance, OH facility and use the existing infrastructure and test facilities for its activities. While the effort needed to accomplish this reorganization has detracted somewhat from SOFCo's efficiency during the fourth quarter, we believe the improved focus on the core fuel cell and fuel reformation resulting from the reorganization will have a positive impact on the SECA project in the long run. The program is organized into three ...
Date: February 1, 2003
Creator: Norrick, Dan; Vesely, Charles; Romine, Todd; Palmer, Brad; Rush, Greg; Barringer, Eric et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The (178m2)Hf Controversy

Description: Since its discovery in the 1960's the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer has garnered high attention from both the basic and applied communities in nuclear science. It's combination of high spin (16+), long half life (31 yrs), and high excitation energy (2.446 MeV) offer unique possibilities as an energy storage medium. Interest in the isomer was rekindled beginning in 1999 when a series of publications began to appear from a group (referred to here as the ''Texas collaboration'') primarily based at the University of Texas, Dallas [1]. They reported observations that some of the stored energy could be released (''triggered'') when the isomer was exposed to a fluence of photons in the energy range {approx}10 to {approx}60 keV. The implications of this observation are profound. Even though the claimed cross section for the process was {approx}7 orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted from the known systematics of photon absorption by nuclei in this mass range [2], such a highly efficient method for triggering the isomeric deexcitation immediately suggested applications utilizing the explosive or the controlled gradual energy release from a very compact source. The prospect of such applications has focused considerable interest on realizing the promise that is implicit in the reported observations. However, two experiments performed by a group from ANL/LANL/LLNL at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (the ''APS collaboration'') reported negative results for the observation of any photon-triggered deexcitation of the {sup 178m2}Hf isomer [3]. This has led to a continued controversy, where both sides have adamantly defended their observations. At this point an outsider has difficulty determining whether there is indeed a triggering effect that should be pursued energetically with substantial resources, or whether the phenomenon consists of overly optimistic interpretation of data.
Date: July 24, 2003
Creator: Becker, J. A.; Gemmell, D. S.; Schiffer, J. P. & Wilhelmy, J. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

1999-2002 Public Housing Partnership: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development and U.S. Department of Energy

Description: In December 1999, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) entered into an Interagency Agreement (IAA) with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its Rebuild America Program to promote conservation and reduce utility costs in public housing through forums, research, demonstration, and evaluation. The IAA was effectively implemented from November 2000 to December 2002. Under the IAA, Rebuild America established 31 new partnerships with public housing authorities, started 6 new partnerships with organizations that focus on public housing, and initiated new projects with 6 existing Rebuild America public housing partnerships. These 43 partnerships directly involved 51 public housing authorities in 77 energy-related projects (several of the 43 partnerships involved multiple housing authorities and projects). Rebuild America assistance on these projects encompassed a wide range of activities, including planning assistance on energy management and capital investment, reviews of utility consumption and metering options, assistance in implementing HUD's energy incentives, design reviews and energy analyses, and assistance in the development of energy projects and resident programs. In addition, Rebuild America made presentations to housing authorities on energy efficiency opportunities and solutions and provided energy training on selected topics at 23 conferences and workshops that impacted many more housing authorities. This report provides an overview of the accomplishments achieved under the IAA; describes the 77 projects that have been completed, are under way, or are planned; and summarizes the presentations and training provided.
Date: June 18, 2003
Creator: Ternes, M. P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2000 Census: Coverage Measurement Programs' Results, Costs, and Lessons Learned

Description: A letter report issued by the General Accounting Office with an abstract that begins "To help measure the quality of the 2000 Census and to possibly adjust for any errors, the U.S. Census Bureau (Bureau) conducted the Accuracy and Coverage Evaluation (A.C.E.) program. However, after obligating around $207 million for A.C.E. and its predecessor program, Integrated Coverage Measurement (I.C.M.), from fiscal years 1996 through 2001, the Bureau did not use either program to adjust the census numbers. Concerned about the amount of money the Bureau spent on I.C.M. and A.C.E. programs and what was produced in return, the subcommittee asked us to review the objectives and results of the programs, the costs of consultants, and how best to track future coverage measurement activities."
Date: January 29, 2003
Creator: United States. General Accounting Office.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The 2001 Economic Recession: How Long, How Deep, and How Different From the Past?

Description: From Summary: "This report examines the 2001 recession and the recessions of the previous three decades in detail. It gives a brief overview of the other post-war recessions. It outlines the fiscal and monetary policy response to each recession."
Date: August 25, 2003
Creator: Labonte, Marc & Makinen, Gail
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2002 Chemical Engineering Division annual report.

Description: The Chemical Engineering Division is one of eight engineering research divisions within Argonne National Laboratory, one of the U.S. government's oldest and largest research laboratories. The University of Chicago oversees the laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Argonne's mission is to conduct basic scientific research, to operate national scientific facilities, to enhance the nation's energy resources, and to develop better ways to manage environmental problems. Argonne has the further responsibility of strengthening the nation's technology base by developing innovative technology and transferring it to industry. The Division is a diverse early-stage engineering organization, specializing in the treatment of spent nuclear fuel, development of advanced electrochemical power sources, and management of both high- and low-level nuclear wastes. Although this work is often indistinguishable from basic research, our efforts are directed toward the practical devices and processes that are covered by Argonne's mission. Additionally, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory; Environment, Safety, and Health Analytical Chemistry services; and Dosimetry and Radioprotection services, which provide a broad range of analytical services to Argonne and other organizations. The Division is multidisciplinary. Its people have formal training as ceramists; physicists; material scientists; electrical, mechanical, chemical, and nuclear engineers; and chemists. They have experience working in academia; urban planning; and the petroleum, aluminum, and automotive industries. Their skills include catalysis, ceramics, electrochemistry, metallurgy, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and petroleum refining, as well as the development of nuclear waste forms, batteries, and high-temperature superconductors. Our wide-ranging expertise finds ready application in solving energy and environmental problems. Division personnel are frequently called on by governmental and industrial organizations for advice and contributions to problem solving in areas that intersect present and past Division programs and activities.
Date: May 22, 2003
Creator: Lewis, D.; Graziano, D. & Miller, J. F.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2002 Hyperspectral Analysis of Hazardous Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site

Description: Hazardous waste site inspection is a labor intensive, time consuming job, performed primarily on the ground using visual inspection and instrumentation. It is an expensive process to continually monitor hazardous waste and/or landfill sites to determine if they are maintaining their integrity. In certain instances, it may be possible to monitor aspects of the hazardous waste sites and landfills remotely. The utilization of multispectral data was suggested for the mapping of clays and iron oxides associated with contaminated groundwater, vegetation stress, and methane gas emissions (which require longer wavelength detectors). The Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, S.C. is a United States Department of Energy facility operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. For decades the SRS was responsible for developing weapons grade plutonium and other materials for the nation's nuclear defense. Hazardous waste was generated during this process. Waste storage site inspection is a particularly important issue at the SRS because there are over 100 hazardous waste sites scattered throughout the 300 mile complex making it difficult to continually monitor all of the facilities. The goal is to use remote sensing technology to identify surface anomalies on the hazardous waste sites as early as possible so that remedial work can take place rapidly to maintain the integrity of the storage sites. The anomalous areas are then targeted for intensive in situ human examination and measurement. During the 1990s, many of the hazardous waste sites were capped with protective layers of polyethelene sheeting and soil, and planted with bahia grass and/or centipede grass. This research investigated hyperspectral remote sensing technology to determine if it can be used to measure accurately and monitor possible indicators of change on vegetated hazardous waste sites. Specifically, it evaluated the usefulness of hyperspectral remote sensing to assess the condition of vegetation on clay- caps on ...
Date: August 28, 2003
Creator: Gladden, J. B.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

Description: The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.
Date: October 1, 2003
Creator: LABORATORY, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department