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Report to the President of the United States

Description: Final report of the Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States describing their activities and findings regarding the failure of the Intelligence Community to provide accurate information about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction. It includes an assessment of current capabilities against threats and recommendations for improving the Intelligence Community.
Date: March 31, 2005
Creator: Commission on the Intelligence Capabilities of the United States Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Dynamic Data-Driven Event Reconstruction for Atmospheric Releases

Description: This is a collaborative LDRD Exploratory Research project involving four directorates--Energy & Environment, Engineering, NAI and Computation. The project seeks to answer the following critical questions regarding atmospheric releases--''How much material was released? When? Where? and What are the potential consequences?'' Inaccurate estimation of the source term can lead to gross errors, time delays during a crisis, and even fatalities. We are developing a capability that seamlessly integrates observational data streams with predictive models in order to provide the best possible estimates of unknown source term parameters, as well as optimal and timely situation analyses consistent with both models and data. Our approach utilizes Bayesian inference and stochastic sampling methods (Markov Chain and Sequential Monte Carlo) to reformulate the inverse problem into a solution based on efficient sampling of an ensemble of predictive simulations, guided by statistical comparisons with data. We are developing a flexible and adaptable data-driven event-reconstruction capability for atmospheric releases that provides (1) quantitative probabilistic estimates of the principal source-term parameters (e.g., the time-varying release rate and location); (2) predictions of increasing fidelity as an event progresses and additional data become available; and (3) analysis tools for sensor network design and uncertainty studies. Our computational framework incorporates multiple stochastic algorithms, operates with a range and variety of atmospheric models, and runs on multiple computer platforms, from workstations to large-scale computing resources. Our final goal is a multi-resolution capability for both real-time operational response and high fidelity multi-scale applications.
Date: March 14, 2005
Creator: Mirin, A; Serban, R & Kosovic, B
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Tc Reductant Chemistry and Crucible Melting Studies with Simulated Hanford Low-Activity Waste

Description: The FY 2003 risk assessment (RA) of bulk vitrification (BV) waste packages used 0.3 wt% of the technetium (Tc) inventory as a leachable salt and found it sufficient to create a significant peak in the groundwater concentration in a 100-meter down-gradient well. Although this peak met regulatory limits, considering uncertainty in the actual Tc salt fraction, peak concentrations could exceed the maximum concentration limit (MCL) under some scenarios so reducing the leachable salt inventory is desirable. The main objective of this study was to reduce the mobile Tc species available within a BV disposal package by reducing the oxidation state of the Tc in the waste feed and/or during melting because Tc in its reduced form of Tc(IV) has a much lower volatility than Tc(VII). Reduced Tc volatility has a secondary benefit of increasing the Tc retention in glass.
Date: March 30, 2005
Creator: Kim, Dong-Sang; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Icenhower, Jonathan P.; McGrail, B PETER.; Scheele, Randall D.; McNamara, Bruce K. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide

Description: Small Wind Electric Systems: An Indiana Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.
Date: March 1, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Plan for Developing and Implementing the LLNL Plutonium Facility and Packaging Program

Description: The LLNL Plutonium Facility uses glove boxes for performing operations involving special nuclear materials (SNM) that for the most part are not connected to each other. Having standalone glove boxes mandates bag-in and bag-out operations to provide personnel safety in material transfers. The use of inexpensive disposable primary and secondary containers (i.e., food pack and paint cans) decreases operational risks by reducing glove box transfers. Typically, containers consist of produce cans, paint cans, lard cans, and egg cans; however, some cans with bolted flanges have been used for protection from oxidation or to reduce dose to the handler. The lard cans and egg cans are slip lid cans and have predominantly been used for the outermost containment, or secondary can, in the packaging configuration. For non-weapon parts the packaging has generally been, from the inner most container to the outside container as (1) the primary can, (2) a bag-out bag, (3) a poultry bag, and (4) a secondary can. This system has evolved over many years and has proven to be effective. During FY2002 through FY2004, the ''Legacy'' material projects at LLNL inspected, repackaged and processed (if necessary), approximately 1500 items, which translates to at least 3000 containers (primary and secondary). There were no failed containers identified during this repacking campaign; however, a documented technical basis does not exist for LLNL's current packaging system. In addition, this system may not meet drop test criteria. To assure that material is packaged and stored safely and consistently, LLNL is developing criteria for packaging and storage of special nuclear materials, as well as the associated technical basis. This document describes the plan for developing these criteria, technical basis, and implementation of the approved packaging and storage plan.
Date: March 29, 2005
Creator: Dodson, K E; Burch, J G; Krikorian, O H & Riley, D C
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide

Description: Small Wind Electric Systems: A North Carolina Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.
Date: March 1, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Modeling of High-altitude Atmospheric Dispersion Using Climate and Meteorological Forecast Data

Description: The overall objective of this study is to provide a demonstration of capability for importing both high altitude meteorological forecast and climatological datasets from NRL into the NARAC modeling system to simulate high altitude atmospheric droplet release and dispersion. The altitude of release for the proposed study is between 60 and 100km altitude. As either standard climatological data (over a period of 40 years) or daily meteorological forecasts can drive the particle dispersion model, we did a limited comparison of simulations with meteorological data and simulations with climatological data. The modeling tools used to address this problem are the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) modeling system at LLNL which are operationally employed to assist DOE/DHS/DOD emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. The interrelation of the various data feeds and codes at NARAC are illustrated in Figure 1. The NARAC scientific models are all verified to both analytic solutions and other codes; the models are validated to field data such as the Prairie Grass study (Barad, 1958). NARAC has multiple real-time meteorological data feeds from the National Weather Service, from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting, from the US Navy, and from the US Air Force. NARAC also keeps a historical archive of meteorological data partially for research purposes. The codes used in this effort were the Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Techniques (ADAPT) model (Sugiyama and Chan, 1998) and a development version of the Langrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator (LODI) model (Nasstrom et al., 2000). The use of the NASA GEOS-4 dataset required the use of a development version of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) model (Hodur, 1997; Chin and Glascoe, 2004). The specific goals of this study are the following: (1) Confirm data compatibility of NRL meteorological and climatological …
Date: March 30, 2005
Creator: Glascoe, L G & Chin, H S
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Direct Probing of Protein-Protein Interactions

Description: This project aimed to establish feasibility of using experimental techniques based on direct measurements of interaction forces on the single molecule scale to characterize equilibrium interaction potentials between individual biological molecules. Such capability will impact several research areas, ranging from rapid interaction screening capabilities to providing verifiable inputs for computational models. It should be one of the enabling technologies for modern proteomics research. This study used a combination of Monte-Carlo simulations, theoretical considerations, and direct experimental measurements to investigate two model systems that represented typical experimental situations: force-induced melting of DNA rigidly attached to the tip, and force-induced unbinding of a protein-antibody pair connected to flexible tethers. Our results establish that for both systems researchers can use force spectroscopy measurements to extract reliable information about equilibrium interaction potentials. However, the approaches necessary to extract these potentials in each case--Jarzynski reconstruction and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy--are very different. We also show how the thermodynamics and kinetics of unbinding process dictates the choice between in each case.
Date: March 10, 2005
Creator: Noy, A; Sulchek, T A & Friddle, R W
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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TEM verification of the <111>-type 4-arm multi-junction in [001]-Mo single crystals

Description: To investigate and verify the formation of <111>-type 4-arm multi-junction by the dislocation reaction of 1/2[111] [b1] + 1/2[{bar 1}1{bar 1}] [b2] + 1/2[{bar 1}{bar 1}1] [b3] = 1/2[{bar 1}11] [b4], which has recently been discovered through computer simulations conducted by Vasily Bulatov and his colleagues.
Date: March 14, 2005
Creator: Hsiung, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide

Description: Small Wind Electric Systems: An Ohio Consumer's Guide provides consumers with information to help them determine whether a small wind electric system can provide all or a portion of the energy they need for their home or business based on their wind resource, energy needs, and their economics. Topics discussed in the guide include how to make a home more energy efficient, how to choose the correct turbine size, the parts of a wind electric system, how to determine whether enough wind resource exists, how to choose the best site for a turbine, how to connect a system to the utility grid, and whether it's possible to become independent of the utility grid using wind energy. In addition, the cover of the guide contains a list of contacts for more information.
Date: March 1, 2005
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

Description: This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Davis, M.; Costyk, D. & Narang, A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Status of Issues in U.S. Edge-Plasma Research and Priority Topics for the Next Five Years

Description: The Edge Coordinating Committee (ECC) was formed in July 14-15, 2004 when OFES Theory Team invited 14 plasma researchers to a two-day meeting in Germantown, MD to discuss the state of edge-plasma research in the U.S. with a focus on theory and modeling (see http://www.mfescience.org/ecc/ ecc/). At that time, OFES tasked the ECC with providing, in about a six month period, a report on the present status of key issues in this area together with a roadmap of what range of activities should be undertaken in the next five years to resolve these issues. This document is a response to that charge. Future edge-plasma research described here is assumed to fit into a budget constraint of a ''flat budget,'' with some additional activities cited for budget increases of as much as 50%. To obtain some measure of the relative fraction of OFES Theory funding presently devoted to edge plasma research, the OFES Theory Team informally surveyed funded work they support in this area at National Labs, Universities, and industry. John Mandrekas reported to us that approximately 10% of the present budget goes to edge-physics areas at 10 institutions, for a total of {approx}$2.5M each year. While not explicitly estimated, we note that there are also important edge plasma projects in the Plasma Technology program, especially related to plasma/material sputtering interactions, near-surface plasma chemistry and transport, and impurity transport. Likewise, the Confinement Program has important efforts in interpreting edge-plasma data through modeling codes. This initial status/roadmap work of the ECC is complimentary to the Fusion Energy Science Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Panel on Program Priorities (see http://www.mfescience.org/fesac/ fesac/). This Panel is charged with identifying major science and technology issues for all of controlled fusion and also with recommending campaigns to address these issues. The Panel has organized their report along six …
Date: March 16, 2005
Creator: Bateman, G.; Chang, C.; Fenstermacher, M.; Guzdar, P.; Hahm, T. S.; Krasheninnikov, S. et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Appendix D-16A Building 515 Waste Accumulation Area

Description: The B-515 WAA is located in the southeast quadrant of the LLNL Main Site (see Figure D-1) along the west side of Building 515 (B-515). Hazardous wastes may be stored at the B-515 WAA for 90 days or less, until transferred to the appropriate Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) facility or other permitted treatment, storage or disposal facility (TSDF). The design storage capacity of this WAA is 4,840 gallons. This appendix is designed to provide information specific to the Building 515 Waste Accumulation Area (B-515 WAA), a waste storage area. This appendix is not designed to be used as a sole source of information. All general information that is not specific to the B-515 WAA is included in the Contingency Plan for Waste Accumulation Areas, dated July 2004, and should be referenced.
Date: March 29, 2005
Creator: Tidwell, L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Radiation shielding issues for MuCool test area at Fermilab

Description: The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this study the origin of the outgoing collimated neutron beam is examined. An alternative shielding option for MTA is investigated as well as the hypothetical worst case of experimental setup is considered.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Rakhno, I. & Johnstone, C.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Large-Scale PV Module Manufacturing Using Ultra-Thin Polycrystalline Silicon Solar Cells: Annual Subcontract Report, 1 October 2003--30 September 2004

Description: The major objectives of this program are to continue the advancement of BP Solar polycrystalline silicon manufacturing technology. The program includes work in the following areas: Efforts in the casting area to increase ingot size, improve ingot material quality, and improve handling of silicon feedstock as it is loaded into the casting stations; developing wire saws to slice 100- m-thick silicon wafers on 290- m centers; developing equipment for demounting and subsequent handling of very thin silicon wafers; developing cell processes using 100- m-thick silicon wafers that produce encapsulated cells with efficiencies of at least 15.4% at an overall yield exceeding 95%; expanding existing in-line manufacturing data reporting systems to provide active process control; establishing a 50-MW (annual nominal capacity) green-field Mega-plant factory model template based on this new thin polycrystalline silicon technology; facilitating an increase in the silicon feedstock industry's production capacity for lower-cost solar-grade silicon feedstock.
Date: March 1, 2005
Creator: Wohlgemuth, J. & Narayanan, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DOE-STD-3013 Surveillance Program for the Storage of Plutonium Packages

Description: This document presents a site-specific DOE-STD-3013 (3013) surveillance program for 3013 material stored at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the B332 Plutonium Facility. The 3013 standard requires the development of a surveillance program to assure the long-term safety of plutonium storage in 3013 compliant containers. A complex-wide Integrated Surveillance Program in Support of Long-Term Storage of Plutonium-Bearing Materials (ISP)(LA-UR-00-3246, Revision 1, March 2001) has been developed to give guidance on an acceptable surveillance approach and to set up a mechanism to integrate surveillance activities and facilitate the sharing of lessons learned. This LLNL 3013 surveillance program has been developed following guidelines established for Storage Sites in the ISP and is sufficient for the storage in the LLNL Plutonium Facility. The LLNL 3013 surveillance program must be coupled with the DOE complex wide Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program and the ISP led by Savannah River Site (SRS). These programs support the technical basis for continuing safe storage of plutonium packages and provide the technical basis for the limited scope of the site-specific LLNL 3013 surveillance program. The LLNL 3013 surveillance program calls for surveillance of 3013 packages to begin approximately three years after packaging of the first oxide. One percent of the stored packages per year will be randomly selected and nondestructively examined (NDE) by LLNL per the guidelines of the ISP. Additional packages may be selected for NDE if recommended by the ISP Steering Committee and agreed upon by the MIS Working Group. One selected package will be shipped to SRS for destructive analysis each year starting when SRS can receive them. This is expected to be in FY2007. We expect to store a maximum of 400 3013 packages. This would result in an expected maximum of 4 surveillances per year. The activities outlined in the program evolved …
Date: March 7, 2005
Creator: Riley, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Design of 3x3 focusing array for heavy ion driver. Final report on CRADA

Description: This memo presents a design of a 3 x 3 quadrupole array for HIF. It contains 3 D magnetic field computations of the array build with racetrack coils with and without different shields. It is shown that it is possible to have a low error magnetic field in the cells and shield the stray fields to acceptable levels. The array design seems to be a practical solution to any size array for future multi-beam heavy ion fusion drivers.
Date: March 30, 2005
Creator: Martovetsky, N. N.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Effect of fluoride in NTS groundwaters on the aqueous speciation of U, Np, Pu, Am and Eu

Description: To address SNJV concerns that fluoride in Nevada Test site (NTS) groundwaters may impact radionuclide speciation and transport, NTS water quality databases were obtained and scanned for analyses with high fluoride concentrations (> 10 mg/L). The aqueous speciation of nine representative samples of these groundwaters with added trace amounts of uranium (U), neptunium (Np), plutonium (Pu), americium (Am) and europium (Eu) was then calculated with the computer code EQ3NR assuming a temperature of 25 C, using currently available thermodynamic data for these species. Under conditions where U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), Am(III) and Eu(III) dominate, F complexes are insignificant (<1 mole %) for U, Np, Pu and Am. Eu-F complexes may be significant in groundwaters that lack bicarbonate, possess pH values less than about 7 at ambient temperatures, or contain F in extremely high concentrations (e.g. > 50 mg/L). The objective is to evaluate the extent to which fluoride in NTS groundwaters complex U(VI), Np(V), Pu(IV), Am(III) and Eu(III). The approach used is to screen existing databases of groundwater chemistry at NTS for waters with high fluoride concentrations and calculate the extent to which fluoride complexes with the nuclides of interest in these waters.
Date: March 22, 2005
Creator: Bruton, C J & Nimz, G J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Comparing 10 Methods for Solution Verification, and Linking to Model Validation

Description: Grid convergence is often assumed as a given during computational analyses involving discretization of an assumed continuum process. In practical use of finite difference and finite element analyses, perfect grid convergence is rarely achieved or assured, and this fact must be addressed to make statements about model validation or the use of models in risk analysis. We have previously provided a 4-step quantitative implementation for a quantitative V&V process. One of the steps in the 4-step process is that of Solution Verification. Solution Verification is the process of assuring that a model approximating a physical reality with a discretized continuum (e.g. finite element) code converges in each discretized domain to a converged answer on the quantity of subsequent validation interest. The modeling reality is that often we are modeling a problem with a discretized code because it is neither continuous spatially (e.g. contact and impact) nor smooth in relevant physics (e.g. shocks, melting, etc). The typical result is a non-monotonic convergence plot that can lead to spurious conclusions about the order of convergence, and a lack of means to estimate residual solution verification error or uncertainty at confidence. We compare ten techniques for grid convergence assessment, each formulated to enable a quantification of solution verification uncertainty at confidence and order of convergence for monotonic and nonmonotonic mesh convergence studies. The more rigorous of these methods require a minimum of four grids in a grid convergence study to quantify the grid convergence uncertainty. The methods supply the quantitative terms for solution verification error and uncertainty estimates needed for inclusion into subsequent model validation, confidence, and reliability analyses. Naturally, most such methodologies are still evolving, and this work represents the views of the authors and not necessarily the views of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
Date: March 23, 2005
Creator: Logan, R W & Nitta, C K
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Ultrasonic Examination of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-104. February 2005

Description: COGEMA Engineering Corporation (COGEMA), under a contract from CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CH2M Hill), has performed an ultrasonic nondestructive examination of selected portions of Double-Shell Tank 241-AP-104. The purpose of this examination was to provide information that could be used to evaluate the integrity of the wall of the primary and secondary tank. The requirements for the ultrasonic examination of Tank 241-AP-104 were to detect, characterize (identify, size, and locate), and record measurements made of any wall thinning that might be present in the wall of the primary tank in the upper knuckle region, and any wall thinning, pitting, or cracks in the wall of the secondary tank in the lower knuckle region. Any measurements that exceed the requirements set forth in the Engineering Task Plan (ETP), RPP-22571 (Jensen 2004) and summarized on page 1 of this document, are reported to CH2M Hill and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for further evaluation. Under the contract with CH2M Hill, all data is to be recorded on disk and paper copies of all measurements are provided to PNNL for third-party evaluation. PNNL is responsible for preparing a report that describes the results of the COGEMA ultrasonic examinations.
Date: March 15, 2005
Creator: Pardini, Allan F. & Posakony, Gerald J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Evaluation of Nevada Test Site Ground Motion and Rock Property Data to Bound Ground Motions at the Yucca Mountain Repository

Description: Yucca Mountain licensing will require estimation of ground motions from probabilistic seismic hazard analyses (PSHA) with annual probabilities of exceedance on the order of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} per year or smaller, which correspond to much longer earthquake return periods than most previous PSHA studies. These long return periods for the Yucca Mountain PSHA result in estimates of ground motion that are extremely high ({approx} 10 g) and that are believed to be physically unrealizable. However, there is at present no generally accepted method to bound ground motions either by showing that the physical properties of materials cannot maintain such extreme motions, or the energy release by the source for such large motions is physically impossible. The purpose of this feasibility study is to examine recorded ground motion and rock property data from nuclear explosions to determine its usefulness for studying the ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The premise is that nuclear explosions are an extreme energy density source, and that the recorded ground motion will provide useful information about the limits of ground motion from extreme earthquakes. The data were categorized by the source and rock properties, and evaluated as to what extent non-linearity in the material has affected the recordings. They also compiled existing results of non-linear dynamic modeling of the explosions carried out by LLNL and other institutions. They conducted an extensive literature review to outline current understanding of extreme ground motion. They also analyzed the data in terms of estimating maximum ground motions at Yucca Mountain.
Date: March 9, 2005
Creator: Hutchings, L. H.; Foxall, W.; Rambo, J. & Wagoner, J. L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Climate Modeling using High-Performance Computing

Description: The Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) and the LLNL Atmospheric Science Division (ASD) are working together to improve predictions of future climate by applying the best available computational methods and computer resources to this problem. Over the last decade, researchers at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have developed a number of climate models that provide state-of-the-art simulations on a wide variety of massively parallel computers. We are now developing and applying a second generation of high-performance climate models. As part of LLNL's participation in DOE's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, members of CASC and ASD are collaborating with other DOE labs and NCAR in the development of a comprehensive, next-generation global climate model. This model incorporates the most current physics and numerics and capably exploits the latest massively parallel computers. One of LLNL's roles in this collaboration is the scalable parallelization of NASA's finite-volume atmospheric dynamical core. We have implemented multiple two-dimensional domain decompositions, where the different decompositions are connected by high-speed transposes. Additional performance is obtained through shared memory parallelization constructs and one-sided interprocess communication. The finite-volume dynamical core is particularly important to atmospheric chemistry simulations, where LLNL has a leading role.
Date: March 3, 2005
Creator: Mirin, A. A.; Wickett, M. E.; Duffy, P. B. & Rotman, D. A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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Analysis Summary of an Assembled Western U.S. Dataset

Description: The dataset for this report is described in Walter et al. (2004) and consists primarily of Nevada Test Site (NTS) explosions, hole collapse and earthquakes. In addition, there were several earthquakes in California and Utah; earthquakes recorded near Cataract Creek, Arizona; mine blasts at two areas in Arizona; and two mine collapses in Wyoming. In the vicinity of NTS there were mainshock/aftershock sequences at Little Skull Mt, Scotty's Junction and Hector ere mine. All the events were shallow and distances ranged from about 0.1 degree to regional distances. All of the data for these events were carefully reviewed and analyzed. In the following sections of the report, we describe analysis procedures, problems with the data and results of analysis.
Date: March 22, 2005
Creator: Ryall, F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
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