1,283 Matching Results

Search Results

Advanced search parameters have been applied.

Interaction of $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$ heat sources with terrestrial and aquatic environments

Description: Radioisotope thermoelectric generators used in space missions are designed with a great factor of safety to ensure that they will withstand reentry from orbit and impact with the earth, and safely contain the nuclear fuel until it is recovered. Existing designs, utilizing $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$ fuel, have proved more than adequately safe. More data about the interaction of this material with terrestrial and aquatic environments is continually being sought to predict the behavior of these heat sources in the extremely unlikely contact of these materials with the land or ocean. Terrestrial environments are simulated with large environmental chambers that permit control of temperature, humidity, and rainfall using different kinds of soils. Rain falling on thermally hot chunks of $sup 238$PuO$sub 2$ causes the spallation of the surface of the fuel into extremely fine particles, as small as 50 nm, that are later transported downward through the soil. Some of the plutonia particles become agglomerated with soil particles. Plutonium transport is more significant during winter than during summer because evaporation losses from the soil are less in winter. Aquatic environments are simulated with large aquaria that provide temperature and aeration control. Earlier fuel designs that employed a plutonia-molybdenum cermet showed plutonium release rates of about 10 $mu$Ci/m$sup 2$ - s, referred to the total surface area of the cermet. Present advanced fuels, employing pure plutonium oxide, show release rates of about 20 nCi/m$sup 2$ - s in seawater and about 150 nCi/m$sup 2$ - s in freshwater. The temperature of these more advanced heat sources does not seem to affect the release rate in seawater. (auth)
Date: January 1, 1975
Creator: Patterson, J.H.; Nelson, G.B.; Matlack, G.M. & Waterbury, G.R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Application of controlled thermonuclear reactor fusion energy for food production

Description: Food and energy shortages in many parts of the world in the past two years raise an immediate need for the evaluation of energy input in food production. The present paper investigates systematically (1) the energy requirement for food production, and (2) the provision of controlled thermonuclear fusion energy for major energy intensive sectors of food manufacturing. Among all the items of energy input to the ''food industry,'' fertilizers, water for irrigation, food processing industries, such as beet sugar refinery and dough making and single cell protein manufacturing, have been chosen for study in detail. A controlled thermonuclear power reactor was used to provide electrical and thermal energy for all these processes. Conceptual design of the application of controlled thermonuclear power, water and air for methanol and ammonia synthesis and single cell protein production is presented. Economic analysis shows that these processes can be competitive. (auth)
Date: June 1, 1975
Creator: Dang, V.D. & Steinberg, M.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proportional and drift chambers in applied investigations

Description: Various applications of Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPC) to problems in medical imaging of x-rays and $gamma$-rays, technical neutron radiography, x-ray crystallography and x-ray astronomy are reviewed. Various types of drift spaces, gas fillings and solid (boron, plastic, lead) converters for enhancing the detection efficiency of the MWPC to gamma and neutron radiations are discussed. (auth)
Date: June 1, 1975
Creator: Perez-Mendez, V.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Fermilab Project X nuclear energy application: Accelerator, spallation target and transmutation technology demonstration

Description: The recent paper 'Accelerator and Target Technology for Accelerator Driven Transmutation and Energy Production' and report 'Accelerators for America's Future' have endorsed the idea that the next generation particle accelerators would enable technological breakthrough needed for nuclear energy applications, including transmutation of waste. In the Fall of 2009 Fermilab sponsored a workshop on Application of High Intensity Proton Accelerators to explore in detail the use of the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) accelerator technology for Nuclear Energy Applications. High intensity Continuous Wave (CW) beam from the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Linac (Project-X) at beam energy between 1-2 GeV will provide an unprecedented experimental and demonstration facility in the United States for much needed nuclear energy Research and Development. We propose to carry out an experimental program to demonstrate the reliability of the accelerator technology, Lead-Bismuth spallation target technology and a transmutation experiment of spent nuclear fuel. We also suggest that this facility could be used for other Nuclear Energy applications.
Date: April 1, 2011
Creator: Gohar, Yousry; /Argonne; Johnson, David; Johnson, Todd; Mishra, Shekhar & /Fermilab
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

THE FACTORS LIMITING THE UTILIZATION OF ZIRCONIUM ALLOYS IN SUPERHEATED STEAM

Description: New experimental data and literature data are utilized to determine the upper temperature of usefulness of zirconium alloys. Three basic engineering assumptions are used: (1) service life requirements are on the order of four years; (2) tubular fuel cladding for rod-type fuel is considered with a maximum wall thickness of 1.27 cm; and (3) heat fluxes are above 157 watts/cm/sup 2/. The interrelation of three basic factors, corrosion rate, corrosion embrittiement by hydrogen and oxygen, and strength are considered. An upper limit for an acceptable corrosion rate for a long-term service of 1 mg/dm/sup 2//day is set primarily by the effect of heat-transfer on corrosion. For the best alloys anticipated, this requirement (even without considering transient conditions) limits cladding surface temperatures to less than 540 C. Oxygen embrittiement of the alloy substrate by oxide film dissolution is not expected to be a limiting factor. Corrosion hydrogen embrittiement was studied in detail and found to limit acceptable service to cladding surface temperatures of less than 525 deg C for established experimental alloys. Hydrogen embrittlement may not be a limiting factor if alloys corrosion resistant enough to be acceptable above 600 deg C could be developed. Zirconium alloys designed for higher strength to overcome their inherent rapid loss of creep strength at temperatures above 540 deg C are expected to be more susceptible to corrosion hydrogen embrittlement. The results of this study indicate that there is good promise for developing zirconium alloys for fuel cladding application at temperatures up to 475 deg C. (auth)
Date: November 20, 1963
Creator: Klepfer, H H & Douglass, D L
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

Description: Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.
Date: March 1, 2012
Creator: Briggs, J. Blair; Tsibulya, Anatoly & Rozhikhin, Yevgeniy
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

The Wind/Water Nexus (Poster)

Description: No abstract prepared.
Date: June 1, 2006
Creator: Flowers, L.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Proposal for a High-Brightness Pulsed Electron Source

Description: We propose a novel scheme for a high-brightness pulsed electron source, which has the potential for many useful applications in electron microscopy, inverse photo-emission, low energy electron scattering experiments, and electron holography. A description of the proposed scheme is presented.
Date: October 16, 2006
Creator: Zolotorev, M.; Commins, E.D.; Heifets, S.; Sannibale, F. & /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /SLAC
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A Compton-Vetoed Germanium Detector with Increased Sensitivity at Low Energies

Description: The difficulty to directly detect plutonium in spent nuclear fuel due to the high Compton background of the fission products motivates the design of a Gamma detector with improved sensitivity at low energies. We have built such a detector by operating a thin high-purity Ge detector with a large scintillator Compton veto directly behind it. The Ge detector is thin to absorb just the low-energy Pu radiation of interest while minimizing Compton scattering of high energy radiation from the fission products. The subsequent scintillator is large so that forward scattered photons from the Ge detector interact in it at least once to provide an anti-coincidence veto for the Ge detector. For highest sensitivity, additional material in the line-of-sight is minimized, the radioactive sample is kept thin, and its radiation is collimated. We will discuss the instrument design, and demonstrate the feasibility of the approach with a prototype that employs two large CsI scintillator vetoes. Initial spectra of a thin Cs-137 calibration source show a background suppression of a factor of {approx}2.5 at {approx}100 keV, limited by an unexpectedly thick 4 mm dead layer in the Ge detector.
Date: March 29, 2012
Creator: Friedrich, S; Bates, C; Drury, O B; Burks, M & DiPrete, D
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

On the preparation of TiAl alloy by direct reduction of the oxide mixtures in calcium chloride melt

Description: In recent years, TiAl-based intermetallic alloys are being increasingly considered for application in areas such as (i) automobile/transport sector (passenger cars, trucks and ships) (ii) aerospace industry (jet engines and High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system) and (iii) industrial gas turbines. These materials offer excellent (i) high temperature properties (at higher than 6000C) (ii) mechanical strength and (iii) resistance to corrosion and as a result have raised renewed interest. The combination of these properties make them possible replacement materials for traditional nickel-based super-alloys, which are nearly as twice as dense (than TiAl based alloys). Since the microstructures of these intermetallic alloys affect, to a significant extent, their ultimate performance, further improvements (by way of alteration/modification of these microstructures), have been the subject matter of intense research investigations. It has now been established that the presence of alloy additives, such as niobium, tantalum, manganese, boron, chromium, silicon, nickel and yttrium etc, in specific quantities, impart marked improvement to the properties, viz. fatigue strength, fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility, of these alloys. From a number of possible alloy compositions, {gamma}-TiAl and Ti-Al-Nb-Cr have, of late, emerged as two promising engineering alloys/materials. . The conventional fabrication process of these alloys include steps such as melting, forging and heat treatment/annealing of the alloy compositions. However, an electrochemical process offers an attractive proposition to prepare these alloys, directly from the mixture of the respective oxides, in just one step. The experimental approach, in this new process, was, therefore, to try to electrochemically reduce the (mixed) oxide pellet to an alloy phase. The removal of oxygen, from the (mixed) oxide pellet, was effected by polarizing the oxide pellet against a graphite electrode in a pool of molten calcium chloride at a temperature of 9000C. The dominant mechanism of the oxygen removal was the ...
Date: November 1, 2011
Creator: Tripathy, Prabhat K. & Fray, Derek J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

Description: Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dots and D-dots, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetic codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a corresponding broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.
Date: August 28, 2007
Creator: Brown, Jr., C G; Throop, A; Eder, D & Kimbrough, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Electromagnetic Pulses at Short-Pulse Laser Facilities

Description: Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) is a known issue for short-pulse laser facilities, and will also be an issue for experiments using the advanced radiographic capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The ARC diagnostic uses four NIF beams that are compressed to picosecond durations for backlighting ignition capsules and other applications. Consequently, we are working to understand the EMP due to high-energy (MeV) electrons escaping from targets heated by short-pulse lasers. Our approach is to measure EMP in the Titan short-pulse laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and to employ that data to establish analysis and simulation capabilities. We have installed a wide variety of probes inside and outside the Titan laser chamber. We have high-frequency B-dot and D-dot probes, a photodiode, and fast current-viewing and integrating current transformers. The probe outputs are digitized by 10 and 20 Gsample/s oscilloscopes. The cables and oscilloscopes are well shielded to reduce noise. Our initial measurement campaign has yielded data useful mainly from several hundreds of MHz to several GHz. We currently are supplementing our high-frequency probes with lower-frequency ones to obtain better low-frequency data. In order to establish analysis and simulation capabilities we are modeling the Titan facility using various commercial and LLNL numerical electromagnetics codes. We have simulated EMP generation by having a specified number of electrons leave the target and strike the chamber wall and other components in the chamber. This short impulse of electrons has a correspondingly broad spectrum, exciting high-frequency structure in the resulting EMP. In this paper, we present results of our initial measurement campaign and comparisons between the measurements and simulations.
Date: February 4, 2008
Creator: Brown, C G; Throop, A; Eder, D & Kimbrough, J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Interfacing ?Soft? and ?Hard? Matter with Exquisite Chemical Control

Description: The present paper reviews the recent development of new chemical and biological technologies for the site-specific immobilization of proteins onto inorganic materials and their potential applications to the fields of micro and nanotechnology.
Date: January 13, 2006
Creator: Woo, Y & Camarero, J A
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Accelerators for heavy ions

Description: No Description Available.
Date: January 1, 1975
Creator: Martin, J.A.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

HIGH-DENSITY, BIO-COMPATIBLE, AND HERMETIC ELECTRICAL FEEDTHROUGHS USING EXTRUDED METAL VIAS

Description: Implanted medical devices such as pacemakers and neural prosthetics require that the electronic components that power these devices are protected from the harsh chemical and biological environment of the body. Typically, the electronics are hermetically sealed inside a bio-compatible package containing feedthroughs that transmit electrical signals, while being impermeable to particles or moisture. We present a novel approach for fabricating one of the highest densities of biocompatible hermetic feedthroughs in alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Alumina substrates with laser machined vias of 200 {mu}m pitch were conformally metallized and lithographically patterned. Hermetic electrical feedthroughs were formed by extruding metal studbumps partially through the vias. Hermeticity testing showed leak rates better than 9x10{sup -10} torr-l/s. Based on our preliminary results and process optimization, this extruded metal via approach is a high-density, low temperature, cost-effective, and robust method of miniaturizing electrical feedthroughs for a wide range of implantable bio-medical device applications.
Date: March 29, 2012
Creator: Tooker, A; Shah, K; Tolosa, V; Sheth, H; Felix, S; Delima, T et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines: Preprint

Description: This paper presents our initial work in performing large-eddy simulations of tidal turbine array flows. First, a horizontally-periodic precursor simulation is performed to create turbulent flow data. Then that data is used as inflow into a tidal turbine array two rows deep and infinitely wide. The turbines are modeled using rotating actuator lines, and the finite-volume method is used to solve the governing equations. In studying the wakes created by the turbines, we observed that the vertical shear of the inflow combined with wake rotation causes lateral wake asymmetry. Also, various turbine configurations are simulated, and the total power production relative to isolated turbines is examined. Staggering consecutive rows of turbines in the simulated configurations allows the greatest efficiency using the least downstream row spacing. Counter-rotating consecutive downstream turbines in a non-staggered array shows a small benefit. This work has identified areas for improvement, such as the use of a larger precursor domain to better capture elongated turbulent structures, the inclusion of salinity and temperature equations to account for density stratification and its effect on turbulence, improved wall shear stress modelling, and the examination of more array configurations.
Date: July 1, 2012
Creator: Churchfield, M. J.; Li, Y. & Moriarty, P. J.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

15-foot bubble chamber characteristics

Description: Specifications, operation, characteristics, cost, and experience with the NAL 15-ft bubble chamber are described. Beam availability and some experimental proposals are discussed. (WHK)
Date: September 15, 1975
Creator: Huson, F. R.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

A designed screening study with prespecified combinations of factor settings

Description: In many applications, the experimenter has limited options about what factor combinations can be chosen for a designed study. Consider a screening study for a production process involving five input factors whose levels have been previously established. The goal of the study is to understand the effect of each factor on the response, a variable that is expensive to measure and results in destruction of the part. From an inventory of available parts with known factor values, we wish to identify a best collection of factor combinations with which to estimate the factor effects. Though the observational nature of the study cannot establish a causal relationship involving the response and the factors, the study can increase understanding of the underlying process. The study can also help determine where investment should be made to control input factors during production that will maximally influence the response. Because the factor combinations are observational, the chosen model matrix will be nonorthogonal and will not allow independent estimation of factor effects. In this manuscript we borrow principles from design of experiments to suggest an 'optimal' selection of factor combinations. Specifically, we consider precision of model parameter estimates, the issue of replication, and abilities to detect lack of fit and to estimate two-factor interactions. Through an example, we present strategies for selecting a subset of factor combinations that simultaneously balance multiple objectives, conduct a limited sensitivity analysis, and provide practical guidance for implementing our techniques across a variety of quality engineering disciplines.
Date: January 1, 2009
Creator: Anderson-cook, Christine M & Robinson, Timothy J
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Using ancillary information to improve hypocenter estimation: Bayesian single event location (BSEL)

Description: We have developed and tested an algorithm, Bayesian Single Event Location (BSEL), for estimating the location of a seismic event. The main driver for our research is the inadequate representation of ancillary information in the hypocenter estimation procedure. The added benefit is that we have also addressed instability issues often encountered with historical NLR solvers (e.g., non-convergence or seismically infeasible results). BSEL differs from established nonlinear regression techniques by using a Bayesian prior probability density function (prior PDF) to incorporate ancillary physical basis constraints about event location. P-wave arrival times from seismic events are used in the development. Depth, a focus of this paper, may be modeled with a prior PDF (potentially skewed) that captures physical basis bounds from surface wave observations. This PDF is constructed from a Rayleigh wave depth excitation eigenfunction that is based on the observed minimum period from a spectrogram analysis and estimated near-source elastic parameters. For example, if the surface wave is an Rg phase, it potentially provides a strong constraint for depth, which has important implications for remote monitoring of nuclear explosions. The proposed Bayesian algorithm is illustrated with events that demonstrate its congruity with established hypocenter estimation methods and its application potential. The BSEL method is applied to three events: (1) A shallow Mw 4 earthquake that occurred near Bardwell, KY on June 6, 2003, (2) the Mw 5.6 earthquake of July 26, 2005 that occurred near Dillon, MT, and (3) a deep Mw 5.7 earthquake that occurred off the coast of Japan on April 22, 1980. A strong Rg was observed from the Bardwell, KY earthquake that places very strong constraints on depth and origin time. No Rg was observed for the Dillon, MT earthquake, but we used the minimum observed period of a Rayleigh wave (7 seconds) to reduce the depth ...
Date: January 1, 2008
Creator: Anderson, Dale N
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Use and Misuse of Chemical Reactivity Spreadsheets

Description: Misidentifying chemical hazards can have serious deleterious effects. Consequences of not identifying a chemical are obvious and include fires, explosions, injury to workers, etc. Consequences of identifying hazards that are really not present can be equally as bad. Misidentifying hazards can result in increased work with loss of productivity, increased expenses, utilization/consumption of scarce resources, and the potential to modify the work to include chemicals or processes that are actually more hazardous than those originally proposed. For these reasons, accurate hazard identification is critical to any safety program. Hazard identification in the world of chemistry is, at best, a daunting task. The knowing or understanding, of the reactions between any of approximately twelve million known chemicals that may be hazardous, is the reason for this task being so arduous. Other variables, such as adding other reactants/contaminants or changing conditions (e.g., temperature, pressure, or concentration), make hazard determination something many would construe as being more than impossibly difficult. Despite these complexities, people who do not have an extensive background in the chemical sciences can be called upon to perform chemical hazard identification. Because hazard identification in the area of chemical safety is so burdensome and because people with a wide variety of training are called upon to perform this work, tools are required to aid in chemical hazard identification. Many tools have been developed. Unfortunately, many of these tools are not seen as the limited resource that they are and are used inappropriately.
Date: September 20, 2005
Creator: Simmons, F
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Nanocrystal quantum dots: building blocks for tunable optical amplifiers and lasers

Description: We study optical processes relevant to optical amplification and lasing in CdSe nanocrystal quantum dots (NQD). NQDs are freestanding nanoparticles prepared using solution-based organometallic reactions originally developed for the Cd chalcogenides, CdS, CdSe and CdTe [J. Am. Chem. Soc. 115, 8706 (1993)]. We investigate NQDs with diameters ranging from 2 to 8 nm. Due to strong quantum confinement, they exhibit size-dependent spectral tunability over an energy range as wide as several hundred meV. We observe a strong effect of the matrix/solvent on optical gain properties of CdSe NQDs. In most of the commonly used solvents (such as hexane and toluene), gain is suppressed due to strong photoinduced absorption associated with carriers trapped at solvent-related interface states. In contrast, matrix-free close packed NQD films (NQD solids) exhibit large optical gain with a magnitude that is sufficiently high for the optical gain to successfully compete with multiparticle Auger recombination [Science 287, 10117 (2000)]. These films exhibit narrowband stimulated emission at both cryogenic and room temperature, and the emission color is tunable with dot size [Science 290, 314 (2000)]. Moreover, the NQD films can be incorporated into microcavities of different geometries (micro-spheres, wires, tubes) that produce lasing in whispering gallery modes. The facile preparation, chemical flexibility and wide-range spectral tunability due to strong quantum confinement are the key advantages that should motivate research into NQD applications in optical amplifiers and lasers.
Date: January 1, 2001
Creator: Mikhailovsky, A. A. (Alexander A.); Malko, A. V. (Anton V.); Klimov, V. I. (Victor I.); Leatherdale, C. A. (Catherine A.); Eisler, H-J. (Hans-J); Bawendi, M. (Moungi) et al.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

ATOMIC FORCE LITHOGRAPHY OF NANO/MICROFLUIDIC CHANNELS FOR VERIFICATION AND MONITORING OF AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

Description: The growing interest in the physics of fluidic flow in nanoscale channels, as well as the possibility for high sensitive detection of ions and single molecules is driving the development of nanofluidic channels. The enrichment of charged analytes due to electric field-controlled flow and surface charge/dipole interactions along the channel can lead to enhancement of sensitivity and limits-of-detection in sensor instruments. Nuclear material processing, waste remediation, and nuclear non-proliferation applications can greatly benefit from this capability. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a low-cost alternative for the machining of disposable nanochannels. The small AFM tip diameter (< 10 nm) can provide for features at scales restricted in conventional optical and electron-beam lithography. This work presents preliminary results on the fabrication of nano/microfluidic channels on polymer films deposited on quartz substrates by AFM lithography.
Date: July 15, 2011
Creator: Mendez-Torres, A.; Torres, R. & Lam, P.
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department