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The Library of the Future, How the heart of campus is transforming

Description: This report discusses the future of academic libraries which serve as an essential gateway to knowledge. It discusses how libraries, as one of the largest facilities on campus, have become vibrant hubs for diverse purposes while retaining flexibility for future needs. How librarians have been steering discussions about open-source journals and courseware, which has profound implications for student access and success, and institutional budgets. Why libraries are leveraging special collections to carve out niches for their institutions and bolster connections with students and the local community. What librarians are saying about how varied their jobs have become, and how the profession is – and isn’t – diversifying. How librarians have adapted to automation to learn new technical, legal, and interpersonal skills.
Access: Restricted to the UNT Community Members at a UNT Libraries Location.
Date: February 2022
Creator: Carlson, Scott
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Ranger Ideal Volume 3: Texas Rangers in the Hall of Fame, 1898–1987

Description: Established in Waco in 1968, the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame and Museum honors the iconic Texas Rangers, a service that has existed, in one form or another, since 1823. Thirty-one individuals—whose lives span more than two centuries—have been enshrined in the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame. They have become legendary symbols of Texas and the American West. In The Ranger Ideal Volume 3, Darren L. Ivey presents capsule biographies of the twelve inductees who served Texas in the twentieth century. In the first portion of the book, Ivey describes the careers of the “Big Four” Ranger captains—Will L. Wright, Frank Hamer, Tom R. Hickman, and Manuel “Lone Wolf” Gonzaullas—as well as those of Charles E. Miller and Marvin “Red” Burton. Ivey then moves into the mid-century and discusses Robert A. Crowder, John J. Klevenhagen, Clinton T. Peoples, and James E. Riddles. Ivey concludes with Bobby Paul Doherty and Stanley K. Guffey, both of whom gave their lives in the line of duty. Using primary records and reliable secondary sources, and rejecting apocryphal tales, The Ranger Ideal presents the true stories of these intrepid men who enforced the law with gallantry, grit, and guns. This Volume 3 is the finale in a three-volume series covering all of the Texas Rangers inducted in the Hall of Fame and Museum in Waco, Texas.
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Date: July 2021
Creator: Ivey, Darren L.
Partner: UNT Libraries

Texas Ranger Captain William L. Wright

Description: William L. Wright (1868–1942) was born to be a Texas Ranger, and hard work made him a great one. Wright tried working as a cowboy and farmer, but it did not suit him. Instead, he became a deputy sheriff and then a Ranger in 1899, battling a mob in the Laredo Smallpox Riot, policing both sides in the Reese-Townsend Feud, and winning a gunfight at Cotulla. His need for a better salary led him to leave the Rangers and become a sheriff. He stayed in that office longer than any of his predecessors in Wilson County, keeping the peace during the so-called Bandit Wars, investigating numerous violent crimes, and surviving being stabbed on the gallows by the man he was hanging. When demands for Ranger reform peaked, he was appointed as a captain and served for most of the next twenty years, retiring in 1939 after commanding dozens of Rangers. Wright emerged unscathed from the Canales investigation, enforced Prohibition in South Texas, and policed oil towns in West Texas, as well as tackling many other legal problems. When he retired, he was the only Ranger in service who had worked under seven governors. Wright has also been honored as an inductee into the Texas Ranger Hall of Fame at Waco.
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Date: September 2021
Creator: McCaslin, Richard B.
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Bell Ringer

Description: This is the story of Victor Rodriguez, star track athlete and San Antonio educator. From his earliest days in South Texas in the 1940s he broke many barriers. As a football player and track star he set records and won trophies at Edna High School, at Victoria College, and at North Texas State College. At each stage of his education, he often found himself the only Mexican American in his group. He developed his sports prowess from nine years of early morning running to the church in Edna, to ring the bell before Mass. He earned the first Hispanic scholarships as an athlete at both Victoria Junior College and North Texas State College. After graduating in 1955, he began a career in the San Antonio School District, ultimately retiring in 1994 after twelve years as Superintendent of the District. As a pioneer Mexican American educator in San Antonio, he brought dignity and respect to the people of the Westside, where he remains a role model today.
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Date: November 2021
Creator: Rodriguez, Victor
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

UNT Upward Bound

Description: Data management plan for the grant, "UNT Upward Bound". The University of North Texas (UNT), located in Denton, Texas, proposes a cooperative partnership with four school districts to sponsor a five-year Upward Bound program for eligible students in four target high schools in North Texas.
Date: 2022-09-01/2027-08-31
Creator: Nelson, Tori
Partner: University of North Texas
open access

University of North Texas Upward Bound

Description: Data management plan for the grant, "University of North Texas Upward Bound". The University of North Texas (UNT), located in Denton, Texas, proposes a cooperative partnership with four school districts to sponsor a five-year Upward Bound program for eligible students in four target high schools in North Texas.
Date: 2022-09-01/2027-08-31
Creator: Nelson, Tori
Partner: University of North Texas

Proud Warriors: African American Combat Units in World War II

Description: During World War II, tens of thousands of African Americans served in segregated combat units in U.S. armed forces. The majority of these units were found in the U.S. Army, and African Americans served in every one of the combat arms. They found opportunities for leadership unparalleled in the rest of American society at the time. Several reached the field grade officer ranks, and one officer reached the rank of brigadier general. Beyond the Army, the Marine Corps refused to enlist African Americans until ordered to do so by the president in June 1942, and two African American combat units were formed and did see service during the war. While the U.S. Navy initially resisted extending the role of African American sailors beyond kitchens, eventually the crew of two ships was composed exclusively of African Americans. The Coast Guard became the first service to integrate—initially with two shipboard experiments and then with the integration of most of their fleet. Finally, the famous Tuskegee airmen are covered in the chapter on air warfare. Proud Warriors makes the case that the wartime experiences of combat units such as the Tank Battalions and the Tuskegee Airmen ultimately convinced President Truman to desegregate the military, without which the progress of the Civil Rights Movement might also have been delayed.
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Date: October 2021
Creator: Bielakowski, Alexander M.
Partner: UNT Libraries

John B. Denton: the Bigger-than Life Story of the Fighting Parson and Texas Ranger

Description: Denton County and the City of Denton are named for pioneer preacher, lawyer, and Indian fighter John B. Denton, but little has been known about him. He was an orphan in frontier Arkansas who became a circuit-riding Methodist preacher and an important member of a movement of early settlers bringing civilization to North Texas. After becoming a ranger on the frontier, he ultimately was killed in the Tarrant Expedition, a Texas Ranger raid on a series of villages inhabited by various Caddoan and other tribes near Village Creek on May 24, 1841. Denton’s true story has been lost or obscured by the persistent mythologizing by publicists for Texas, especially by pulp western writer Alfred W. Arrington. Cochran separates the truth from the myth in this meticulous biography, which also contains a detailed discussion of the controversy surrounding the burial of John B. Denton and offers some alternative scenarios for what happened to his body after his death on the frontier.
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Date: October 2021
Creator: Cochran, Mike
Partner: UNT Libraries

Dirty Eddie's War: Based on the World War II Diary of Harry "Dirty Eddie" March, Jr., Pacific Fighter Ace

Description: Dirty Eddie’s War is the true account of the war-time experiences of Harry Andrew March, Jr., captured by way of diary entries addressed to his beloved wife, Elsa. Nicknamed “Dirty Eddie” by his comrades, he served as a member of four squadrons operating in the South Pacific, frequently under difficult and perilous conditions. Flying initially from aircraft carriers covering the landings at Guadalcanal in August 1942, he was one of the first pilots in the air over the island and then later based at Henderson Field with the “Cactus Air Force.” When he returned to combat at Bougainville and the “Hot Box” of Rabaul, the exploits of the new Corsair squadron “Fighting Seventeen” became legendary. Disregarding official regulations, March kept an unauthorized diary recording life onboard aircraft carriers, the brutal campaign and primitive living conditions on Guadalcanal, and the shattering loss of close friends and comrades. He captures the intensity of combat operations over Rabaul and the stresses of overwhelming enemy aerial opposition. Lee Cook presents Dirty Eddie’s story through genuine extracts from his diary supplemented with contextual narrative on the war effort. It reveals the personal account of a pilot’s innermost thoughts: the action he saw, the effects of his harrowing experiences, and his longing to be reunited with the love of his life back home.
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Date: August 2021
Creator: Cook, Lee
Partner: UNT Libraries

Rare Integrity: A Portrait of L. W. Payne, Jr.

Description: Leonidas Warren Payne, Jr. (1873-1945), counted Robert Frost among his friends and a member of the inner circle of poets who embraced him and sought his advice. He altered forever the perception of Texas when he created the Texas Folklore Society that continues to record, publish, and promote Texas history, myth, music, and customs. He guided J. Frank Dobie back into The University of Texas fold, where Dobie produced his finest work and established a voice for Texas literature. L. W. Payne, Jr., influenced generations of American school children through his anthologies that became basic English textbooks. Drawing upon Payne’s own writing, interviews with former colleagues and students, and private letters lain undisclosed since Payne’s death, Rare Integrity reveals a portrait of a man whose great gift of creative generosity and warmth of heart enabled him to see a person as the person wished to be seen.
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Date: November 2021
Creator: Alexander, Hansen
Partner: UNT Libraries

Times Remembered: the Final Years of the Bill Evans Trio

Description: In the late 1970s legendary pianist Bill Evans was at the peak of his career. He revolutionized the jazz trio (bass, piano, drums) by giving each part equal emphasis in what jazz historian Ted Gioia called a “telepathic level” of interplay. It was an ideal opportunity for a sideman, and after auditioning in 1978, Joe La Barbera was ecstatic when he was offered the drum chair, completing the trio with Evans and bassist Marc Johnson. In Times Remembered, La Barbera and co-author Charles Levin provide an intimate fly-on-the-wall peek into Evans’s life, critical recording sessions, and behind-the-scenes anecdotes of life on the road. Joe regales the trio’s magical connection, a group that quickly gelled to play music on the deepest and purest level imaginable. He also watches his dream gig disappear, a casualty of Evans’s historical drug abuse when the pianist dies in a New York hospital emergency room in 1980. But La Barbera tells this story with love and respect, free of judgment, showing Evans’s humanity and uncanny ability to transcend physical weakness and deliver first-rate performances at nearly every show.
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Date: September 2021
Creator: LaBarbera, Joe & Levin, Charles
Partner: UNT Libraries

Oral History Interview with Toni Lewis, May 14, 2013

Description: Interview with Toni Lewis, U.S. Air Force veteran, for the Women Veterans Oral history Project. Lewis discusses her childhood, decision to enlist in 1976, experiences as a woman in the service, experiences with the Veterans Administration, and opinions about changing roles for women in the U.S. military.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: May 14, 2013
Creator: Hedrick, Amy & Lewis, Toni
Partner: UNT Oral History Program

Oral History Interview with Laura Gonzalez, October 13, 2007

Description: Interview with Laura Gonzalez, Mexican-born immigrant to the U.S., immigrant rights activist, and professor of anthropology with expertise in immigrant communities from Guanajuato, Mexico. She discusses her childhood and education in Mexico city; the decision to pursue a career in the field of political anthropology; decision to open the Oak Cliff Center for Community Studies; work with Camposanto del Cemento Grande and other community organizations in Dallas; work to increase Hispanics’ access to college; and involvement in immigrant rights movements and local Mexican American political groups. This interview has Spanish and English translations.
Access: Restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: October 13, 2007
Creator: Calderon, Roberto & Laura, Gonzalez
Partner: UNT Oral History Program
open access

Personalized Adaptive Teacher Education to Increase Self-Efficacy: Toward a Framework for Teacher Education

Description: This study investigated personalized adaptive learning, teacher education, and self-efficacy to determine if personalized adaptive teacher education can increase self-efficacy. It is suggested that teachers with higher self-efficacy tend to stay in the teaching profession longer. Chapters 2 and 3 are literature reviews on personalizing adaptive learning to determine what common components are used in personalized adaptive learning systems to get a clear understanding of what previous literature suggests building this study on it. Chapter 4 investigates the data collected from 385 teachers to understand better what teachers report on factors that increase their self-efficacy. As a result, it was found that teachers' self-efficacy increases with more training, support, and resources. In chapter 5, a framework was developed based on previous findings, with components of personalized adaptive learning to provide support/help at the right time for teachers to increase their self-efficacy. An empirical study was conducted to validate this framework, where the framework was used as a guide to personalize and adapt summer teacher preservice training and survey teachers on their self-efficacy before and after the training to see its impact on teachers' self-efficacy. However, since summer preservice training was virtual, the framework could not be implemented fully, as we were not able to observe teachers' behaviors and monitor their learning to provide them help and support, as needed and being in the post-COVID-19 year as educators dealing with about two-year learning loss systemwide, seems decreased teachers' self-efficacy. The findings of this study can guide preservice teacher education institutions and decision-makers of teacher education to assess inservice teachers' needs and self-efficacy to help and support them with a more personalized adaptive education to improve their self-efficacy.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Shemshack, Atikah
Partner: UNT Libraries

High-Immersion Virtual Reality for Language Learning

Description: This manuscript-style dissertation consists of three publications interconnected in their focus on the dynamically evolving use of immersive virtual reality technologies for language education. The manuscripts included in this dissertation were adapted from three research papers published or submitted for publication in scientific journals and book chapters. The first manuscript provides an overview of immersive technologies of different levels of immersion, ranging from 2D displays on a flat screen to highly immersive interactive experiences rendered in virtual reality using head-mounted displays. The second manuscript is a systematic review, and it narrows down the scope of immersive technologies outlined in the previous publication by exploring existing research on the technologies related to the highest level of immersion for language learning, namely the high-immersion virtual reality technologies. The third manuscript continues to investigate the application of those technologies for language learning, but the focus is shifted from examining virtual reality applications to exploring language teachers' beliefs about using those technologies. This dissertation offers a comprehensive overview of high-immersion virtual reality use for language learning which may serve as an ideal starting point for researchers and educators interested in learning more about the current state of virtual reality integration in schools from the perspectives of both language learners and teachers.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Kucher, Tetyana
Partner: UNT Libraries

Investigation of Gene Functions in the Cyanotrophic Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764

Description: Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB 11764 (Pf11764) is one of a group of bacteria known as cyanotrophs that exhibit the unique ability to grow on toxic cyanide as the sole nitrogen source. This ability has previously been genetically linked to a conserved cluster of seven genes (Nit1C), the signature gene (nitC) coding for a nitrilase enzyme. Nitrilases convert nitriles to ammonia and a carboxylic acid. Still, for the Pf11764 NitC enzyme (Nit11764), no in vivo substrate has been identified, and the basis of the enzyme's requirement for cyanide growth has remained unclear. Therefore, the gene was cloned and the enzyme was characterized with respect to its structure and function. These efforts resulted in the unique discovery that, aside from its nitrilase activity, Nit11764 exhibits nuclease activity towards both DNA and RNA. This ability is consistent with computer analysis of the protein providing evidence of a preponderance of amino acids with a high probability for RNA binding. A Nit11764 knock-out mutant was shown to exhibit a higher sensitivity to both cyanide (KCN) and mitomycin C, both known to induce chromosomal damage. Thus, the overall conclusion is that Nit11764, and likely the entire Nit1C gene cluster, functions as a possible repair mechanism for overcoming the damage inflicted on Pf11764 nucleic acids by toxic cyanide. Towards a further investigation of the Nit1C gene cluster in Pf11764, a second gene (nitH) annotated as a monooxygenase was also investigated. Interestingly, computer-based analysis shows that NitH also harbors a preponderance of RNA-binding amino acids. The nitH gene was cloned into an expression vector with the long-range goal of defining its role in CN utilization.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2027.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Gullapalli, Jaya Swetha
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

"Rein of Renegades"

Description: Rein of Renegades is an introduction to the young adult contemporary fantasy novel of the same name. It is prefaced with an explication of various drafts written throughout adolescence. I am trying to reclaim things I've misplaced or dropped. Over the past few years, I've had much too many trinkets to carry. There went the melodramatic allegations from my teenage writing voice, cracked on a classroom floor. There went the ability to sit, stomach deep, so steadily grounded in another world, this escape blurred with the strawberry ice cream I dripped onto the campus concrete. Writing the ideal love becomes complicated, jaded, too realistic when the hands writing it are always reaching for someone who never reaches back at the right time
Date: May 2022
Creator: Ulery, Sarah
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Practice of Content-Driven Composition for Instrument and Computer

Description: Two compositions, live electronic music for instrument and computer, have been analyzed in the essay to reflect one of my aesthetics principles, content-driven composition, and the solutions that the I have applied to solve the problems which have occurred in practice. By content-driven, I mean that compositional process, material, mood, and affect are expressions of content drawn from visual art, literature, nature, religion, traditional aesthetics and other non-musical sources. During the journey of exploration, I was often deeply moved and inspired by a historical moment, a real-world story, a film, a poem, a statement, an image, a piece of music, or a natural law. In content-driven works, these elements play a major role in the creative processes.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Shen, Qi
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Impact of Processing Parameters and Forces on Channels Created by Friction Stir Bobbin Tools

Description: In this thesis, friction stir channeling (FSC) and its process parameters influence on geometry, surface quality and productivity are explored. The probe of the friction stir processing (FSP) tool used to perform these tests was a modified submerged bobbin tool made of MP 159 Co-Ni alloy. The body was made from H13 tool steel. To find the optimal channel conditions for a targeted range of process parameters, multiple 6061 aluminum samples were prepared with a U shape guide to test the effects of different spindle speeds and feed rates. Using a gantry-type computer numerical control (CNC) friction stir welding (FSW) machine, the aluminum coupons were subjected to calibration experiments, force control tests, and an increased production rate to test these effects. It was found through experimentation that the programmed feed rates, spindle speeds and forces produced by the machine had an impact on the channel geometry. It was determined from the force-controlled setup that 8.46 mm/s at 750 RPM was the best combination of results for the four conditions tested on a CNC friction stir processing-machine. It was then tested at 10.58 mm/s at 800 RPM, which had comparable results with the best combination of input parameters from the force-controlled runs which demonstrates the utility of the process in high production settings. Finally, a proof-of-concept experiment was performed on a robotic arm outfitted with a FSW holder, showing acceptable results. This is a validation of its future implementation in the manufacturing of large parts for lightweight, aerospace, and automotive applications.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Koonce, James G
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

Assessing New Dimensions of an Organization's Learning Culture

Description: Work-based and employee-driven informal learning, training and development have been increasing in importance in the last few decades. Concurrently, organizations seek to measure the extent to which they develop a culture and structure that supports individual learning and organizational learning. This study develops and validates a scale that can measure the extent to which an organization is perceived to provide online learning that is personalized for its employees and perceived to recognize skills and competencies acquired through non-degree and other pathways. This research can provide organizations with the ability to measure and benchmark attributes of their learning culture that are important to work-based and lifelong learning as well as talent recruitment and management.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Scott, Jennifer Lyne
Partner: UNT Libraries
open access

The Community of Inquiry Survey Instrument: Measurement Invariance in the Community College Population

Description: This study aimed to observe measurement invariance between community college students and university students in response to the Community of Inquiry (CoI) Survey instrument. Most studies of the CoI survey instruments have recorded and validated the instruments considering undergraduate or graduate students. This study sought to validate and prove the survey tool as a reliable instrument for the community college population. The study employed SEM and meta-analytic procedures to observe measurement invariance between a Monte Carlo generated general university sample population and the community college survey population. The findings are discussed, as well as the implications for CoI studies in the community college.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Chambers, Roger Antonio
Partner: UNT Libraries

Public Opinion and Maintaining Political Power: The Case of AKP Government and Social Media in Turkey

Description: This dissertation consists of three chapters, aiming to analyze, understand and discuss how Turkish public opinion fluctuates on social media based on governmental actions and how that fluctuation affects the society and politics in Turkey. Using textual data from social media, I combined natural language processing techniques with statistical methods, to study how Turkish public opinion is shaped by governmental actions in various scenarios. In the first chapter, I created a social network of Twitter users to detect the differences in the extent of political polarization between pro-government and opposition voters during the June 2019 Istanbul mayoral election. The second chapter focuses on the stigmatization of a social/religious group in Turkey by government-driven labeling and terrorism designation. Word embeddings are used to pinpoint the offensive language and the hate campaign against the group, considering the labels that are used to identify the group. Finally, the third chapter examines the rally-around-the-flag effect during highly inciting moments like cross-border military operations. A corpus of tweets for each of the two Turkish cross-border military operations is analyzed using topic modeling and sentiment analysis to get a grasp of the rally effect and how the governments can benefit in internal matters from the changes in public discourse because of this rally effect.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Demirhan, Emirhan
Partner: UNT Libraries

CFD Study of Ship Hydrodynamics in Calm Water with Shear Current and in Designed Wave Trails

Description: Although the capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in modeling ship hydrodynamics is well explored in many studies, they still have two main limitations. First, those studies ignore the effect of non-uniform shear current which exists in realistic situation. Second, the focus of most studies was laid more on the seakeeping/maneuvering performance and less attention was paid to survivability of ships due to extreme ship response events in waves, which are considered rare events but influential. In this thesis, we explore the capability of CFD in those two areas. In the first part of the thesis, the hydrodynamic performance of KCS in the presence of a non-uniform shear current is investigated for the first time using high-fidelity CFD simulations. Various shear current conditions with different directions were considered and results were compared with the ones with no shear current. The second part of the thesis focuses on study of rare events of ship responses by development of extreme response conditioning techniques to design the wave trail. Two conditioned techniques based on Gaussian and non-Gaussian processes are considered.
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Phan, Khang Minh
Partner: UNT Libraries

To Constrain or Tame: Aristotle and Machiavelli on Demagogy

Description: What defines demagogues and what sort of threat do they pose to democracy? Contemporary politics has recently witnessed a rise in demagogic leaders around the globe. Following this trend, many notable scholars have sought to better define the ancient term and to provide politics with advice on how to handle them. However, demagogy is hard to define, and research is divided over what truly makes for a demagogue. Scholars tend to either focus on the intention, the tools, or the effects of leaders to categorize demagogy. While they might disagree over which aspect of demagogy is most salient, they are more unanimous in their claims regarding the threat that demagogy poses to democracy. Before we outright condemn demagogy, I argue that we should better understand the phenomenon and its relationship to democracy. This dissertation turns to Machiavelli and Aristotle in order to better grasp and better define the phenomenon of demagogy. I first build a concept of demagogy through Aristotle's Politics and then use that concept to detect a similar phenomenon within the work of Machiavelli. In many ways Aristotle and Machiavelli affirm the claims of contemporary scholars, especially regarding the threat that demagogy poses to democracy. According to both thinkers, demagogy involves the use of factions, class enmities, and the corruption of law. Possibly more troubling, both show how the methods of demagogy remain an ever-present possibility to democratic rule. Nevertheless, Aristotle and Machiavelli disagree with contemporary scholarship on how to address the problem of demagogy. Rather than seek out ways to constrain the demagogue, the two philosophers dedicate themselves to providing an education to demagogues. Even more surprisingly, this dissertation argues that both have covertly tried to persuade others to adopt the methods of demagogy for the sake of better preserving democracy and perhaps even to improve upon …
This item is restricted from view until June 1, 2024.
Date: May 2022
Creator: Graham, Sebastian R
Partner: UNT Libraries
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