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Unaccompanied Alien Children: Demographics in Brief

Description: This report discusses children coming to the United States who are not accompanied by parents or legal guardians and who lack proper immigration documents has raised complex and competing sets of humanitarian concerns and immigration control issues. This report focuses on the demographics of unaccompanied alien children while they are in removal proceedings.
Date: September 24, 2014
Creator: Wasem, Ruth Ellen & Morris, Austin
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

An Energy Atlas of Five Central American Countries

Description: In a series of maps and figures, this bilingual atlas summarizes what is known about the energy resources and how these resources and oil imports supply the energy needs of five Central American countries: Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Costa Rica, and Panama. The main exploited energy resources are firewood, hydroelectric energy, bagasse from sugar cane residues, and geothermal energy. Limited oil exploration in the region has uncovered modest oil resources only in Guatemala. Peat and small coal deposits are also known to exist but are not presently being exploited. After the description of energy resources, this atlas describes energy supply and demand patterns in each country. It concludes with a description of socioeconomic data that strongly affect energy demand. 4 refs.
Date: August 1, 1988
Creator: Trocki, Linda; Newman, C. Kay; Gurulé, Flavio; Aragón, Patricia C. & Peck, Claudia
Partner: UNT Libraries Government Documents Department
open access

[News Script: Guatemala]

Description: Script from the WBAP-TV/NBC station in Fort Worth, Texas, relating a news story.
Date: February 28, 1970, 10:00 p.m.
Creator: WBAP-TV (Television station : Fort Worth, Tex.)
Partner: UNT Libraries Special Collections

Delantal

Description: Delantal (Apron). Made from remnant of jaspe (ikat) corte (skirt). Material is very nicely detailed with a scalloped bottom that is trimmed in velvet. The lining of the pockets is made from the same skirt material. This piece was probably used as an accessory to a garment for a statue of a saint.
Date: 1970/1979
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Pants

Description: Man's Pantalones (pants) of red, blue, green, orange, and white striped woven cotton. Textile created on back strap loom. All hand seamed. One selvedge and three hemmed ends.
Date: 1940/1949
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Huipil panel

Description: Unused (neck opening never cut) huipil (woman's blouse). White cotton warp and weft handwoven on the back strap loom - technique called picb'il (supplementary weft brocade on a spaced or gauze weave textile - no supplemental weft). This style of huipil is always wider than longer so the side panels will hang lower than the center panel. This huipil is never tucked into the skirt, thus giving the wearer the freedom to move around and feel cool in the subtropical climate of 3500'.
Date: 1960/1969
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Huipil panel

Description: Center panel from a 3 breadth ceremonial huipil. Handwoven on a backstrap loom in cotton with cotton double- faced brocaded pattern motifs (geometric and double-faced eagles)
Date: 1970/1979
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Huipil panel

Description: Unused (neck opening never cut) huipil (woman's blouse). White cotton warp and weft handwoven on the back strap loom - technique called picb'il (supplementary weft brocade on a spaced or gauze weave textile - no supplemental weft). This style huipil is always wider than longer so the side panels will hang lower than the center panel. This huipil is never tucked into the skirt, thus giving the wearer freedom to move around and feel cool in the subtropical climate of 3500'.
Date: 1960/1969
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Pants

Description: Man's Pantalones (Pants). Handwoven back strap loomed in cotton. White with purple stripes about 1/2" wide. Hand embroidered cotton design motifs at lower leg. Hand-stitched construction.
Date: 1930/1939
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Morga skirt

Description: Ceremonial Morga (Skirt) of purple and blue striped and patterned handwoven cotton and rayon. Created on a treadle loom with warp jaspe (ikat) patterning.
Date: 1960/1969
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Huipil panel

Description: Unused (neck opening never cut) huipil (woman's blouse). White cotton warp and weft handwoven on the backstrap loom - technique called picb'il (supplementary weft brocade on a spaced or gauze weave textile - no supplemental weft). This huipil is never tucked into the skirt, thus giving the wearer the freedom to move around and feel cool in the subtropical climate of 3500'.
Date: 1960/1969
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Caftan

Description: Caftan. Vintage Guatemalan skirt (possibly from Santa Maria de Jesus) remade into a contemporary caftan. Original skirt handwoven on treadle loom all cotton. Hand embroidered cotton randa (joining seam). Notice the handmade fabric toggle closure at neckline to complement original design of skirt.
Date: 1970/1979
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Cinta

Description: Cinta (woman’s hairband) of red cotton with multicolored stripes and silk floss tassels at both ends. Textile was handwoven on the backstrap loom with cotton warp and weft.
Date: 1970/1979
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Ceremonial huipil

Description: Ceremonial/Cofradia (religious society) Huipil. 2 breadth garment back strap loomed in cotton with cotton and silk single-faced brocaded designs - broad and widely spaced red warp stripes amid very wide areas of ixcaco (natural brown cotton) - no trim at neck or sleeves.
Date: 1960/1970
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design

Tzut

Description: Man's tzut (head or shoulder cloth) of handspun cotton, possibly for a member of the Cofradia (religious society). Back strap loomed warp face plain weave with warp stripes and warp jaspe (ikat).
Date: 1950/1959
Partner: UNT College of Visual Arts + Design
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