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Secondary Social Studies Teaching Competencies as Perceived by Student-Teachers, Instructors, and Administrators in Thailand

Description: The major purpose of this study was to determine what differences exist among groups of social studies student-teachers, instructors, and administrators in eight teachers colleges in Northern Thailand regarding their perceptions of the importance of selected social studies teaching competencies.
Date: August 1990
Creator: Kamonkan Witayangkoon
Partner: UNT Libraries

Computer Literacy Levels and Attitudes toward Computers of Thai Public University Students

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate and analyze computer literacy and general attitudes toward computers of students at Thai public unversities. The comparative study of computer literacy levels and attitudes toward computers among Thai students with various demographic classification was performed followed by the study of relationships between the two variables among the samples. A fifty-eight-item questionnaire was adapted from the computer literacy questionnaire developed by the researchers at the Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium. The items were designed to assess knowledge and attitudes relative to computers. The questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 492 students who took at least one computer course from thirteen public universities in Thailand. Statistical tests used to analyze the data included t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and Pearson product moment correlations. Based on the research findings, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) Thai university students exhibited a moderate computer literacy level. (2) While a higher proportion of female students enrolled in computer classes, male and female students reported similar computer literacy levels. (3) Graduate students had higher computer literacy levels than did other students from different educational levels. (4) Academic majors and academic performance (GPAs) were also factors affecting computer literacy levels. Education majors displayed higher computer literacy levels than mathematics majors and science majors. (5) Students with higher GPAs had higher levels of computer literacy than the groups with lower GPAs. (6) Computer literacy was not age dependent. (7) Generally, Thai university students showed positive attitudes toward computers. (8) Males and females both showed positive attitudes toward computers. (9) Graduate students exhibited more positive attitudes toward computers than all other groups. (10) The groups of students with lower GPAs displayed lower positive attitudes toward computers. (11) There was a strong positive relationship between students' knowledge and their attitudes toward computers. ...
Date: August 1989
Creator: Jaruwan Skulkhu
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction among Faculty Members at Six Metropolitan Area Teachers Colleges in Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of study was to compare job satisfaction and job dissatisfaction among faculty members at six teachers colleges in the Bangkok metropolitan area with respect to age, gender, length of experience, level of education, administrative position, academic rank, department, faculties, and salary. The findings of this research were compared with previous studies of Vatthaisong (1982) and Karoonlanjakorn (1986), which measured job satisfaction among faculty members in the Northeastern part and in the non-metropolitan areas of Central Thailand. Additionally, this inquiry expanded the two previous studies and speculated on the possibility that Herzberg's two-factor theory is adaptable to Thai faculty members in Thailand. The instrument consisted of ten demographic items and a 67-statement questionnaire. The questionnaire was based on Herzberg's two-factor theory, and used a five-point rating scale for ten facets of job satisfaction/dissatisfaction. The total stratified random sampling population was made up of 400 faculty members from six teachers colleges in the Bangkok metropolitan area. The returned rate for questionnaires was 383 (95.75%). Frequency, percentage, mean, t-test, one-way analysis of variance, and Scheffe method were used for analyses. The level of significance was set at .05. The findings of this study indicated that faculty members with high ages, high work, experiences, high salaries, high academic ranks, high levels of education, and high administrative positions were more satisfied with their jobs than faculty members with lower rankings in these demographic variables. Male faculty members were more satisfied than female faculty members. The results of this research were similar to Vatthaisong's and different from Karoonlanjakorn's. The faculty members of Vatthaisong's inquiry and those of the present study were satisfied with their jobs in every facet except salary, while Karoonlanjakorn's findings reported that no areas of dissatisfaction were revealed. Because the factors described in Herzberg's theory were not the same as those ...
Date: May 1989
Creator: Suntharin Thanagosai
Partner: UNT Libraries

Thai High School Compute Literacy: A Content Analysis

Description: This study examined the extent to which each computer literacy objective domain, each specific mode of instruction, and each type of question were treated in Thai high school computer literacy text materials. Two textbooks and their accompanying teachers' manuals were examined using three analytical schemes as frameworks for the examinations. The Minnesota Educational Computing Consortium (MECC) computer literacy objectives were used to classify the content in the text materials in order to determine the degree of emphasis on each computer literacy objective domain. The Hawaii state Department of Education (HSDE) instructional modes were used to classify the content in the text materials in order to determine the degree of emphasis on each mode of instruction. Bloom's taxonomy of education, cognitive domain, was used to classify the review questions and exercises in the text materials in order to determine the degree of emphasis on each cognitive level. Detailed findings are given as numerals, percentages, and decimal values. Perspectives are offered on the need for textbooks which reflect the values and feelings objectives. Conclusions were that (a) text materials focus most on the programming/algorithms objectives and tend to exclude the values and feelings objectives; (b) text materials use only three modes of instruction, focusing first on the topic mode, second on the tutee mode, and last on the tool mode; (c) text material questions focus more on higher cognitive than on lower cognitive levels.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Pornpun Chaipraparl
Partner: UNT Libraries

Attitudes of Faculty Members in the Open Universities in Thailand toward Media Technologies

Description: This study was to compare the attitudes in terms of sex and current position, and to investigate the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies in terms of age, education, and teaching experience. A 25-statement questionnaire, with a reliability of 0.91 for measuring attitudes, was used to gather the data. The total stratified random sampling population was 300 faculty members in the Open Universities, 272 from Ramkhamhaeng University (RU) and 28 from Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University (STOU). The returned rate of the questionnaire was 244 (81.33%), 219 (80.51%) from RU and 25 (89.28%) from STOU. The t test was used to test significant differences between males and females, and administrators and faculties. The one-way analysis of variance was used to test significant differences among the levels of age, education, and teaching experience. The results of this study indicated that the attitudes of faculty members in Open Universities in Thailand toward media technologies were not significantly different in terms of sex, age, education, teaching experience, and current position. The faculty members considered the use of (1) closed circuit television as the form of media which enhanced teaching quality and student learning in virtually all instructional contents, aided instructors, improved instruction, and was readily available; (2) television as the form of media which made the content of the course more clear for students, promoted students* independent study, increased student motivation, was helpful to instructors in improving instruction, and was cost-beneficial; (3) radio as the form of media most frequently used in the past; (4) overhead projector as the form of media most manageable in the teaching process; (5) laser disc player as the form of media too complex for efficient classroom use; and (6) interactive video systems as the form of media most inhibiting to instructors.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Suteera Suriyawongse
Partner: UNT Libraries

Knowledge and Skills for the Adult Educator in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to identify and specify knowledge and skills needed by adult educators in Thailand. This study provided information for establishing a guide to be used in professional training and in graduate programs in adult education. A three round Delphi technique was used to develop the consensus of findings. The first round solicited open-ended responses from twenty panelists. One hundred and twenty-five knowledge and skill statements, the responses from the first round, were developed into a five-point rating scale questionnaire. This questionnaire was utilized in both Round II and III. Median, mode and interquartile ranges were applied to specify the consensus of the panel of experts. The one hundred and twenty-five knowledge and skill statements, seventy-five knowledge statements and fifty skill statements, were classified into four major categories: teaching, administration, research and general experience. The experts for the study consisted of eleven non-formal education officers and nine university professors in adult/continuing education and non-formal education. From seventy-five knowledge statements, sixteen were rated at the highest priority of importance. Forty-nine statements were rated at above average priority of importance and two statements were rated at average. Eight statements did not meet the interquartile range criterion as a consensus of the panelists. From fifty skill statements, fifteen statements were rated at the highest priority of importance; thirty statements were rated at above average; one statement was rated at average; and four statements failed to meet the interquartile range criterion.
Date: December 1987
Creator: Tamrongsin Jiearatrakul
Partner: UNT Libraries

Job Satisfaction Among Physical Education Instructors at Teachers Colleges in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate job satisfaction among physical education instructors at Teachers Colleges in Thailand by using the Faculty Job Satisfaction/Dissatisfaction Scale developed by Olin R. Wood, which was translated into the Thai language by Vatthaisong. The investigation was based on the 10 facets of job satisfaction selected from Herzberg's Motivation-Hygiene theory: achievement, growth, interpersonal relations, policy and administration, recognition, responsibility, salary, supervision, the work itself, and working conditions. The questionnaire consisted of 68 items. A 6-point rating scale was used for the 10 facets of job satisfaction. A total of 169 physical education instructors from 36 Teachers Colleges in Thailand, or 86.22% of the population, participated in this study. For this investigation, frequencies, percentages, one-way ANOVA, and the Scheffe method were used for data analysis. Significance was established at the .05 level. From the findings of this study it could be concluded that physical education instructors were satisfied with their jobs. The major sources of satisfaction were ranked as follows: interpersonal relations, the work itself, achievement, recognition, responsibility, working conditions, growth, policy and administration, supervision, and salary. The gender variable did not contribute significantly to job satisfaction, while region, age, level of education, work position, years of teaching experience, and salary level did contribute significantly to job satisfaction. There were no significant differences between the overall job satisfaction (item 68) of the physical education instructors and their demographic classifications. The levels of overall job satisfaction derived from the 10 facets and item 68 were similar. Thus it could be concluded that physical education instructors at Teachers Colleges in Thailand were satisfied with their jobs.
Date: May 1989
Creator: Suchart Chewapun
Partner: UNT Libraries

Competencies and In-Service Training of Functional Literacy Teachers in Northeastern Thailand

Description: This study was designed to determine (a) the most important knowledge and skills for functional literacy teachers; (b) the most important competencies to be covered in in-service training; (c) whether there were any differences between the perceptions of functional literacy teachers, supervisors, and administrators in terms of needed competencies or areas of training; and (d) whether there were any differences in the perceptions of teachers, supervisors and administrators regarding the need for competencies and for training of functional literacy teachers based upon these variables: age, years of experience in formal and nonformal education, and training in the functional literacy program. It was found that teachers, supervisors, and administrators agreed that most competencies listed in the instrument were important. No significant difference was found in their perceptions of the importance of the competencies. A significant difference was found in the perceptions of the needs for training among these three groups.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Pensri Saeteo
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Relationship between Western and Thai Music Objectives in the Undergraduate Music Programs of Selected Thai Universities and Colleges

Description: The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationship between Western and Thai music objectives in the undergraduate music programs of selected Thai universities and colleges. The data were collected from two sources: (1) an investigation of university music catalogs and syllabi for potential conflict areas in Western and Thai music objectives, and (2) questionnaire responses from university music teachers regarding their opinions about those potential conflict areas found from reviewing catalogs and syllabi. The dissertation is organized into six chapters: the introduction in Chapter I; the synthesis of related literature and background information regarding music study in higher education in Thailand in Chapter II; the design of the study in Chapter III; the comparisons of required music programs of six Thai universities in Chapter IV; the analysis of questionnaire data in Chapter V; and the summary, conclusions, discussions, and recommendations in Chapter VI. It was found that Western and Thai music objectives tended to be seen as supporting each other in the areas of music theory, orchestration, form and analysis, music history, counterpoint, composition, and the practice of pitched and unpitched musical instruments. Sight reading practices in Western music were found to support the rote method utilized in the study of Thai music. Western and Thai singing methods tended to be seen as conflicting somewhat with each other. The Western diatonic scale system tended to be seen as conflicting somewhat with the Thai musical scale system. The establishment of a course in the sight-reading of Thai music was recommended in Thai universities.
Date: August 1989
Creator: Twatchai Narkwong
Partner: UNT Libraries

An Analysis of the Perceptions of Physics Teaching Effectiveness as Viewed by Students and Physics Instructors in Universities in Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of the physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students regarding actual teaching performance and effective teaching performance. The sample consisted of a total of 56 physics instructors, 120 major-physics students, and 120 nonmajor-physics students at eight public universities in Thailand. A total of 53 physics instructors or 94.64 percent, 101 major-physics students or 84.17 percent, and 107 nonmajor-physics students or 89.17 percent responded in this study. Multivariate analysis of variance, univariate analysis, one-way analysis of variance, and multiple regression were used in the follow-up assessment, with the .05 level of significance. The physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students perceived actual teaching performance in class to be significantly different from effective teaching performance. The three groups rated actual teaching performance on every factor to be less than sffective teaching. There was a significant difference between the physics instructors' perceptions and the major-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance, and also there was a significant difference between the physics instructors' perceptions and the nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. However, there was no significant difference between major-and nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. There was no significant difference among the perceptions of the physics instructors, major-physics students, and nonmajor-physics students regarding effective teaching performance. The variables of sex and the highest degree were the significant predictors of the physics instructors' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance. The variable of GPA was the significant predictor of the nonmajor-physics students' perceptions regarding actual teaching performance.
Date: August 1988
Creator: Chayan Boonyaraksa
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of Academic Advising at Ramkhamhaeng University

Description: The purpose of this study was to assess the perceptions of academic advising needs by faculty advisors and students at Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand, using the Academic Advising Needs Questionnaire developed by Thomas H. Burke. The assessment is based on age, sex, education level, academic rank, years of advising, and number of advisees. The questionnaire consisted of 15 items, using a four-point rating scale. The population consisted of a total of 280 faculty members and 700 resident students at all seven faculties at Ramkhamhaeng University, Bangkok, Thailand. A total of 230 faculty members or 82.14 percent of the sampling and a total of 561 students or 80.14 percent of the sampling participated in this study. The t-test, Spearman s Coefficient of Rank Correlation, and Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W were used in the follow-up assessment, with the level of significance at .05. Data were collected by means of two Academic Advising Needs Questionnaires for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to faculty advisors and students. While students revealed some degree of need in all advising areas, the five highest ranked items were: (1) serve as a student's personal reference for prospective employers and/or graduate goals, (2) assist students in obtaining part-time work experiences (paid or unpaid) which complement their career and/or educational goals, (3) assist students with career/vocational planning, (4) help students explore possible graduate/professional school study, and (5) provide students with academic advice and suggestions for scholastic improvement. Faculty responses indicated student need in all advising areas; the five highest ranked items were: (1) assist students with career/vocational planning, (2) help students explore possible graduate/professional school study, (3) assist students in selecting a major, (4) inform students of the employment opportunities in the students' intended fields of study, and (5) assist students in obtaining part-time work experiences (paid or unpaid) ...
Date: May 1988
Creator: Chartchai Essarum
Partner: UNT Libraries

A Study of Student and Faculty Perceptions of the Academic Advising Needs of Students in Six Teachers' Colleges in Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to determine and compare the academic advising needs of students as perceived by students and faculty advisors through faculty advising functions in the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand. Fifteen faculty advising functions were included in a questionnaire validated by a panel of three judges. The questionnaires were distributed to students and faculty advisors in the six teachers' colleges by two selected research assistants. A total of 180 faculty advisors and 540 junior and senior teacher training students at the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand, were selected using stratified random sampling. The usable and complete questionnaires received included 109 from faculty advisors (60.56 per cent) and 350 from students (64.81 per cent). The t-test, the Kendall's Coefficient of Concordance W, and the Spearman's Coefficient of Rank Correlation were employed to determine and compare the differences, the agreements, and the relationships of academic advising needs of students as perceived by students and faculty advisors, respectively. Analyses of the data revealed that students and faculty advisors in the six teachers' colleges in Bangkok, Thailand, perceived a mismatch between student advising needs now being fulfilled and student advising needs that should be fulfilled. Apparently, the academic advising programs in the teachers' colleges were not meeting the student needs. However, for student advising needs which should be fulfilled, both students and faculty advisors ranked personal, vocational and career, and academic areas very high. Overall, students and faculty seemed to agree on the advising needs which should be fulfilled.
Date: May 1988
Creator: Vinich Getkham
Partner: UNT Libraries

The Development of the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, Bangkok, Thailand

Description: The purpose of this study was to describe the development of Thailand's oldest private university, the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, Bangkok, Thailand, from 1963 to 1987. This historical research used records and documents which are primary sources from the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce and the Association of Private Higher Education Institutions of Thailand together with interviews with the chairman of the Thai Chamber of Commerce, president, faculty and staff of the University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce. Secondary sources were reports and publications from the Ministry of University Affairs and libraries in Thailand. The areas of emphasis in the study were government policies on private higher education, legislation that initiated the founding of the University, the founder, the university's goals, the university's organizational structure, financial sources, admission policies, physical plants, programs, faculty and students. It was found that the Thai government encourages the establishment of private higher education institutions. The Private Higher Educational Institution Act of 1979 was enacted to allow Private universities to be equal to government universities. The university of the Thai Chamber of Commerce was founded by the Thai Chamber of Commerce with the purpose of training Thai students for the business sector and promoting the economic stability of the nation. The university's organizational structure is centralized and is self-supporting. The university strives for academic excellence, and thus supports the development of the nation. Suggestions for further study include: (a) the study of private higher education institutions which were established with all of the various fields of study in place, and (b) a study to identify factors that will contribute to the future development of the university of the Thai Chamber of Commerce and other private universities in Thailand.
Date: December 1989
Creator: Orachorn Arthabowornpisan
Partner: UNT Libraries

Participants and Nonparticipants in Nonformal Education in Thai Rural Areas: A Secondary- Analysis

Description: This study was a secondary analysis of survey data on participants and nonparticipants in Thai rural education programs. The original data were collected in 1987 by the Office of the National Educational Commission, Office of the Prime Minister, Bangkok Thailand. This study was conducted in order to examine the effect of selected demographic variables on participation and to determine why some rural villagers participate in nonformal educational programs and other villagers do not. The data were collected from a survey of nonformal education in Thai rural areas conducted as part of the evaluation of the Fifth Five-Year Plan. The population consisted of 590 participants in nonformal education programs and 860 nonparticipants. The statistical techniques employed to analyze data were logit analysis, z-test, tables of binomial distribution, and ranking by each of the groups (participants and nonparticipants). The evidence from this study indicates that the average nonformal education participant is an adult between the age of 36 and 50 years, who has completed four or less years of education, and who is married and works in farming (cultivating rice). The findings reveal that participants and nonparticipants in nonformal education programs were significantly different according to their needs for health knowledge, agricultural knowledge, further education, knowledge for living, and vocational knowledge. The reasons associated with participation in nonformal education programs, in this study, were to gain knowledge useful for making a living, for personal interest, to interact with instructors and students, or to make new friends. In this study, the reasons that villagers did not participate in the program were because they lacked time and transportation. While majority of the participants responded that they were satisfied with the nonformal educational courses, four subgroups, adults from age 21 to 35 years, single adults, adults who completed P.5 (grade 5) and above, and farmers, ...
Date: December 1989
Creator: Puongrat Kesonpat
Partner: UNT Libraries