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A Different Face of War: Memories of a Medical Service Corps Officer in Vietnam

Description: Assigned as the senior medical advisor to the Army of the Republic of Vietnam in I Corps, an area close to the DMZ, James G. Van Straten traveled extensively and interacted with military officers and non-commissioned officers, peasant-class farmers, Buddhist bonzes, shopkeepers, scribes, physicians, nurses, the mentally ill, and even political operatives. He sent his wife daily letters from July 1966 through June 1967, describing in impressive detail his experiences, and those letters became the primary source for his memoir. The author is grateful that his wife retained all the letters he wrote to her and their children during the year they were apart. The author describes with great clarity and poignancy the anguish among the survivors when an American cargo plane in bad weather lands short of the Da Nang Air Base runway on Christmas Eve and crashes into a Vietnamese coastal village, killing more than 100 people and destroying their village; the heart-wrenching pleadings of a teenage girl that her shrapnel-ravaged leg not be amputated; and the anger of an American helicopter pilot who made repeated trips into a hot landing zone to evacuate the wounded, only to have the Vietnamese insist that the dead be given a higher priority.
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Date: November 2015
Creator: Van Straten, Jim
Item Type: Book

Eleven Days in Hell: the 1974 Carrasco Prison Siege in Huntsville, Texas

Description: From one o’clock on the afternoon of July 24, 1974, until shortly before ten o’clock the night of August 3, eleven days later, one of the longest hostage-taking sieges in the history of the United States took place in Texas’s Huntsville State Prison. The ringleader, Federico (Fred) Gomez Carrasco, the former boss of the largest drug-running operation in south Texas, was serving life for assault with intent to commit murder on a police officer. Using his connections to smuggle guns and ammunition into the prison, and employing the aid of two other inmates, he took eleven prison workers and four inmates hostage in the prison library. Demanding bulletproof helmets and vests, he planned to use the hostages as shields for his escape. Negotiations began immediately with prison warden H. H. Husbands and W. J. Estelle, Jr., Director of the Texas Department of Corrections. The Texas Rangers, the Department of Public Safety, and the FBI arrived to assist as the media descended on Huntsville. When one of the hostages suggested a moving structure of chalkboards padded with law books to absorb bullets, Carrasco agreed to the plan. The captors entered their escape pod with four hostages and secured eight others to the moving barricade. While the target was en route to an armored car, Estelle had his team blast it with fire hoses. In a violent end to the standoff, Carrasco committed suicide, one of his two accomplices was killed (the other later executed), and two hostages were killed by their captors.
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Date: August 15, 2004
Creator: Harper, William T.
Item Type: Book

Features and Fillers: Texas Journalists on Texas Folklore

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about animals, folk music, weather lore, folk beliefs, legends, folk medicine, poetry and other folktales. The index begins on page 229.
Date: 1999
Creator: Harris, Jim
Item Type: Book

First Timers and Old Timers: the Texas Folklore Society Fire Burns On

Description: The Texas Folklore Society has been alive and kicking for over one hundred years now, and I don’t really think there’s any mystery as to what keeps the organization going strong. The secret to our longevity is simply the constant replenishment of our body of contributors. We are especially fortunate in recent years to have had papers given at our annual meetings by new members—young members, many of whom are college or even high school students. These presentations are oftentimes given during sessions right alongside some of our oldest members. We’ve also had long-time members who’ve been around for years but had never yet given papers; thankfully, they finally took the opportunity to present their research, fulfilling the mission of the TFS: to collect, preserve, and present the lore of Texas and the Southwest. You’ll find in this book some of the best articles from those presentations. The first fruits of our youngest or newest members include Acayla Haile on the folklore of plants. Familiar and well-respected names like J. Rhett Rushing and Kenneth W. Davis discuss folklore about monsters and the classic “widow’s revenge” tale. These works—and the people who produced them—represent the secret behind the history of the Texas Folklore Society, as well as its future.
Date: December 15, 2012
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.
Item Type: Book

Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 1985
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward
Item Type: Book

Folk Travelers: Ballads, Tales and Talk

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and Mexico, including traveling anecdotes, folk ballads, folklore in natural history, as well as information about black and white magic, Western animals, and cattle brands. The index begins on page 259.
Date: 1953
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin
Item Type: Book

The Folklore of Texan Cultures

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of various ethnic and religious groups residing in Texas, including songs, myths, legends, and other essays. The index begins on page 363.
Date: 1974
Creator: Texas Folklore Society
Item Type: Book

Follow de Drinkin' Gou'd

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society includes information about the play-party in Oklahoma, folklore of Texas birds, tall tales, folk anecdotes, Texas folk songs and ballads, and other folklore (back cover). The index begins on page 185.
Date: 2000
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964
Item Type: Book

T for Texas: a State Full of Folklore

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about crafts, stories about vampires, stories about peyote ceremonies, prison folklore, folk songs, and other miscellaneous folk tales.
Date: 1982
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward
Item Type: Book

Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service

Description: What do diverse events such as the integration of the University of Mississippi, the federal trials of Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa, the confrontation at Ruby Ridge, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina have in common? The U.S. Marshals were instrumental in all of them. Whether pursuing dangerous felons in each of the 94 judicial districts or extraditing them from other countries; protecting federal judges, prosecutors, and witnesses from threats; transporting and maintaining prisoners and detainees; or administering the sale of assets obtained from criminal activity, the U.S. Marshals Service has adapted and overcome a mountain of barriers since their founding (on September 24, 1789) as the oldest federal law enforcement organization. In Forging the Star, historian David S. Turk lifts the fog around the agency’s complex modern period. From the inside, he allows a look within the storied organization. The research and writing of this singular account took over a decade, drawn from fresh primary source material with interviews from active or retired management, deputy U.S. marshals who witnessed major events, and the administrative personnel who supported them. Forging the Star is a comprehensive official history that will answer many questions about this legendary agency. The contents include: Origins of a modern agency -- The thirties and forties: roots of disparate duties -- The fifties: signs of a coming era -- Walking in fire: the 1960s in America -- Catalysts of change -- Focal points -- End of an era -- The seventies: moving beyond civil disturbance -- The new director -- The resurgence of protective operations -- Facing protest and peril -- Regionalization, Patty Hearst and Guam -- An evolution of leadership -- The eighties: redefinition -- Strike teams and high-profile prisoners -- The development of a golden age -- Unique enforcement operations -- The U.S. Marshals improvement revolution ...
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Date: July 2016
Creator: Turk, David S.
Item Type: Book

Fort Worth Characters

Description: Fort Worth history is far more than the handful of familiar names that every true-blue Fort Worther hears growing up: leaders such as Amon Carter, B. B. Paddock, J. Frank Norris, and William McDonald. Their names are indexed in the history books for ready reference. But the drama that is Fort Worth history contains other, less famous characters who played important roles, like Judge James Swayne, Madam Mary Porter, and Marshal Sam Farmer: well known enough in their day but since forgotten. Others, like Al Hayne, lived their lives in the shadows until one, spectacular moment of heroism. Then there are the lawmen, Jim Courtright, Jeff Daggett, and Thomas Finch. They wore badges, but did not always represent the best of law and order. These seven plus five others are gathered together between the covers of this book. Each has a story that deserves to be told. If they did not all make history, they certainly lived in historic times. The jury is still out on whether they shaped their times or merely reflected those times. Either way, their stories add new perspectives to the familiar Fort Worth story, revealing how the law worked in the old days and what life was like for persons of color and for women living in a man’s world. As the old TV show used to say, “There are a million stories in the ‘Naked City.’” There may not be quite as many stories in Cowtown, but there are plenty waiting to be told—enough for future volumes of Fort Worth Characters. But this is a good starting point.
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Date: October 15, 2009
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.
Item Type: Book

Fresh Ink: Behind the Scenes at a Major Metropolitan Newspaper

Description: This book describes the work done at the Dallas Morning News newspaper office by taking a "behind-the-scenes" approach to discuss story selection, journalistic decisions, staff contributions, and community reactions. Although the text focuses on the week from November 4-10, 1991, it also looks at the history of the Dallas Morning News and major accomplishments of the newspaper.
Date: 1995
Creator: Gelsanliter, David
Item Type: Book

From Hell to Breakfast

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and Mexico, including religious anecdotes, stories about Native American dances, stories about petroleum and oil fields, folk songs, legends, customs and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 205.
Date: 1944
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964
Item Type: Book

Gib Morgan, Minstrel of the Oil Fields

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society includes stories about the life of a West Texas oil driller named Gib Morgan and other folk stories about the oil industry.
Date: 1945
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin
Item Type: Book

Gideon Lincecum's Sword: Civil War Letters From the Texas Home Front

Description: Compilation of letters written by Gideon Lincecum, a natural scientist and philosopher living in Texas, discussing various events and his experiences during the Civil War as a proponent of the Confederacy. The collection includes editorial notes and commentary. Index starts on page 373.
Date: 2001
Creator: Lincecum, Jerry Bryan; Phillips, Edward Hake & Redshaw, Peggy A.
Item Type: Book

The Golden Log

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular Texas folklore, including information about unusual Texas place names, folktales about spiders, folktales about witchcraft, ghosts and superstitions, and information about early petroleum geologists. The index begins on page 167.
Date: 1962
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin
Item Type: Book

A Good Tale and a Bonnie Tune

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains miscellaneous folklore about Texas and Mexico, including Mexican folktales, Texas folk songs, information about Texas streams and information about racial discrimination in the South. The index begins on page 273.
Date: 1964
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin
Item Type: Book

Grace: A Novel

Description: In the east Texas town of Cold Springs in 1944, the community waits for the war to end. In this place where certain boundaries are not crossed and in a time when people reveal little about themselves, their problems, and their passions, Jane Roberts Wood exposes the heart of each of four families during the last year of World War II. Bound together by neighborhood and Southern customs, yet separated by class, money, and family, they are an unforgettable lot, vibrantly brought to life in this “delightfully perceptive and unabashedly romantic” novel (Sanford Herald). As the war grinds to an end, it becomes the catalyst that drives the inhabitants of Cold Springs across the boundaries that had once divided them, taking them to places both chaotic and astonishing. “A rare novel: intelligent, lyrical, devoid of coyness and manipulative plot turns—a book for old and young.”—Austin American-Statesman
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Date: October 15, 2009
Creator: Wood, Jane Roberts
Item Type: Book

A Guide to Sources of Texas Criminal Justice Statistics

Description: This reference work was compiled as a resource for those needing assistance in locating Texas criminal justice statistics. R. Scott Harnsberger has compiled more than 600 entries describing statistical sources for Texas crime; criminals; law enforcement; courts and sentencing; adult and juvenile corrections; capital punishment and death row; victims of crime; driving/boating under the influence; traffic fatalities; substance abuse and treatment; polls and rankings; and fiscal topics such as appropriations, revenues, expenditures, and federal aid.
Date: 2011
Creator: Harnsberger, R. Scott
Item Type: Book

Happy Hunting Ground

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Central and South America, including Mexican ballads, primitive art, cowboy dances, reptile myths, superstitions, Indian pictographs, and other folktales. The index begins on page 127.
Date: 1925
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964 & Texas Folklore Society
Item Type: Book

The Healer of Los Olmos and Other Mexican Lore

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains Texas and Mexican folklore, including folktales, Mexican folk remedies, and stories about Don Pedrito Jaramillo, who was the Curandero of Los Olmos. The index begins on page 137.
Date: 1951
Creator: Texas Folklore Society
Item Type: Book

Hecho en Tejas: Texas-Mexican Folk Arts and Crafts

Description: Book about Texas and Mexican folk arts and crafts, including paper crafts, quilting, weaving, sculpture, yard art, saddle-making, and other folk crafts. The index begins on page 349.
Date: 1991
Creator: Graham, Joe S.
Item Type: Book

Hide, Horn, Fish, and Fowl: Texas Hunting and Fishing Lore

Description: What would cause someone to withstand freezing temperatures in a cramped wooden box for hours on end, or stand in waist-high rushing waters, flicking a pole back and forth over and over—in many cases with nothing whatsoever to show for his efforts? Why is it that, into the twenty-first century, with the convenience of practically any type of red meat or fish available at the local supermarket, we continue to hunt game and fish on open waters? The answer is that no matter how sophisticated we think we are, no matter how technologically advanced we become, there is still something deep within us that beckons us to “the hunt.” This desire creates the customs, beliefs, and rituals related to hunting—for deer, hogs, and other four-legged critters, as well as fish and snakes, and other things that perhaps aren’t physically alive, but capture our interest as much as the prey mentioned above. These rituals and customs lead to some of our most treasured stories, legends, and practices. This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society includes serious, introspective articles on hunting and fishing, as well as humorous tall tales and “windies” about the big ones that got away—all lore that reminds us of that drive that calls us to become predators again.
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Date: December 15, 2011
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.
Item Type: Book