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Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas

Description: El Charro, or man on horseback, has represented the spirit of independent Mexico since he played an important role in the 1821 revolution. He is the Mexican version of the American cowboy, only much older, arising from the ranch culture first brought to Mexico by the Spanish. The Charreada is his rodeo, his opportunity to show off both his skills with rope and horse and his decorative, elegant costume. It is at the center of Mexican heritage and self-image, a source of mythology and genuine heroes that has been brought to Texas by immigrants. And since 1989, it has included women, charras, who participate in elaborate and difficult riding formations.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hambric, Julia; Woolley, Bryan; Abernethy, Francis Edward & Rendon, Al

Charreada: Mexican Rodeo in Texas

Description: El Charro, or man on horseback, has represented the spirit of independent Mexico since he played an important role in the 1821 revolution. He is the Mexican version of the American cowboy, only much older, arising from the ranch culture first brought to Mexico by the Spanish. The Charreada is his rodeo, his opportunity to show off both his skills with rope and horse and his decorative, elegant costume. It is at the center of Mexican heritage and self-image, a source of mythology and genuine heroes that has been brought to Texas by immigrants. And since 1989, it has included women, charras, who participate in elaborate and difficult riding formations.
Date: 2012
Creator: Hambric, Julia; Woolley, Bryan; Abernethy, Francis Edward & Rendon, Al

Coffee in the Gourd

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a collection of miscellaneous folklore of Texas and Mexico, including folk songs, information about Indian pictographs, legends, superstitions, and weather lore. The index begins on page 105.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Coffee in the Gourd

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a collection of miscellaneous folklore of Texas and Mexico, including folk songs, information about Indian pictographs, legends, superstitions, and weather lore. The index begins on page 105.
Date: 1923
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Corners of Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about folk music, folk arts and crafts, history of Texas, prominent Texas writers, and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 285.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Corners of Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about folk music, folk arts and crafts, history of Texas, prominent Texas writers, and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 285.
Date: 1993
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Coyote Wisdom

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Mexico and Texas, including animal folk stories, Navajo creation myths, discussions about folk characters, discussions about the philosophy of folklore, and other miscellaneous folk stories. The index begins on page 293.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Coyote Wisdom

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Mexico and Texas, including animal folk stories, Navajo creation myths, discussions about folk characters, discussions about the philosophy of folklore, and other miscellaneous folk stories. The index begins on page 293.
Date: 1938
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter

Description: Death provides us with some of our very best folklore. Some fear it, some embrace it, and most have pretty firm ideas about what happens when we die. Although some people may not want to talk about dying, it’s the only thing that happens to all of us–and there’s no way to get around it. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society examines the lore of death and whatever happens afterward. The first chapter examines places where people are buried, either permanently or temporarily. Chapter Two features articles about how people die and the rituals associated with funerals and burials. The third chapter explores some of the stranger stories about what happens after we’re gone, and the last chapter offers some philosophical musings about death in general, as well as our connection to those who have gone before.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 15, 2008
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Diamond Bessie & The Shepherds

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including folk dramas, myths, folk music, stories about farming and agriculture, religious folk stories, and information about folk customs, dances and folk art. The index begins on page 157.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

Diamond Bessie & The Shepherds

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including folk dramas, myths, folk music, stories about farming and agriculture, religious folk stories, and information about folk customs, dances and folk art. The index begins on page 157.
Date: 1972
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends

Description: The family saga—as Mody and this collection defines it—is made up of an accumulation of separate family legends. These are the stories of the old folks and the old times that are told among the family when they gather for funerals or Thanksgiving dinner. These are the "remember-when" stories the family tells about the time when the grownups were children.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward; Lincecum, Jerry Bryan & Vick, Frances B.

The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends

Description: The family saga—as Mody and this collection defines it—is made up of an accumulation of separate family legends. These are the stories of the old folks and the old times that are told among the family when they gather for funerals or Thanksgiving dinner. These are the "remember-when" stories the family tells about the time when the grownups were children.
Date: 2003
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward; Lincecum, Jerry Bryan & Vick, Frances B.

First Timers and Old Timers: the Texas Folklore Society Fire Burns On

Description: The Texas Folklore Society has been alive and kicking for over one hundred years now, and I don’t really think there’s any mystery as to what keeps the organization going strong. The secret to our longevity is simply the constant replenishment of our body of contributors. We are especially fortunate in recent years to have had papers given at our annual meetings by new members—young members, many of whom are college or even high school students. These presentations are oftentimes given during sessions right alongside some of our oldest members. We’ve also had long-time members who’ve been around for years but had never yet given papers; thankfully, they finally took the opportunity to present their research, fulfilling the mission of the TFS: to collect, preserve, and present the lore of Texas and the Southwest. You’ll find in this book some of the best articles from those presentations. The first fruits of our youngest or newest members include Acayla Haile on the folklore of plants. Familiar and well-respected names like J. Rhett Rushing and Kenneth W. Davis discuss folklore about monsters and the classic “widow’s revenge” tale. These works—and the people who produced them—represent the secret behind the history of the Texas Folklore Society, as well as its future.
Date: December 15, 2012
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 1985
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Folk Travelers: Ballads, Tales and Talk

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and Mexico, including traveling anecdotes, folk ballads, folklore in natural history, as well as information about black and white magic, Western animals, and cattle brands. The index begins on page 259.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Folk Travelers: Ballads, Tales and Talk

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and Mexico, including traveling anecdotes, folk ballads, folklore in natural history, as well as information about black and white magic, Western animals, and cattle brands. The index begins on page 259.
Date: 1953
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Folklore: in All of Us, in All We Do

Description: Folklore is everywhere, whether you are aware of it or not. A culture’s traditional knowledge is used to remember the past and maintain traditions, to communicate with other members within a community, to learn, to celebrate, and to express creativity. It is what helps distinguish one culture from another. Although folklore is so much a part of our daily lives, we often lose sight of just how integral it is to everything we do. If we look for it, we can find folklore in places where we’d never think it existed. Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do includes articles on a variety of topics. One chapter looks at how folklore and history complement one another; while historical records provide facts about dates, places and names, folklore brings those events and people to life by making them relevant to us. Several articles examine the cultural roles women fill. Other articles feature folklore of particular groups, including oil field workers, mail carriers, doctors, engineers, police officers, horse traders, and politicians. As a follow-up article to Inside the Classroom (and Out), which focused on folklore in education, there is also an article on how teachers can use writing in the classroom as a means of keeping alive the storytelling tradition. The Texas Folklore Society has been collecting and preserving folklore since its first publication in 1912. Since then, it has published or assisted in the publication of nearly one hundred books on Texas folklore.
Date: 2017
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Folklore: in All of Us, in All We Do

Description: Folklore is everywhere, whether you are aware of it or not. A culture’s traditional knowledge is used to remember the past and maintain traditions, to communicate with other members within a community, to learn, to celebrate, and to express creativity. It is what helps distinguish one culture from another. Although folklore is so much a part of our daily lives, we often lose sight of just how integral it is to everything we do. If we look for it, we can find folklore in places where we’d never think it existed. Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do includes articles on a variety of topics. One chapter looks at how folklore and history complement one another; while historical records provide facts about dates, places and names, folklore brings those events and people to life by making them relevant to us. Several articles examine the cultural roles women fill. Other articles feature folklore of particular groups, including oil field workers, mail carriers, doctors, engineers, police officers, horse traders, and politicians. As a follow-up article to Inside the Classroom (and Out), which focused on folklore in education, there is also an article on how teachers can use writing in the classroom as a means of keeping alive the storytelling tradition. The Texas Folklore Society has been collecting and preserving folklore since its first publication in 1912. Since then, it has published or assisted in the publication of nearly one hundred books on Texas folklore.
Date: December 15, 2006
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Folklore in Motion: Texas Travel Lore

Description: The adventurous spirit of Texans has led to much travel lore, from stories of how ancestors first came to the state to reflections of how technology has affected the customs, language, and stories of life “on the go.” This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society features articles from beloved storytellers like John O. West, Kenneth W. Davis, and F. E. Abernethy as well as new voices like Janet Simonds. Chapters contain traditional “Gone to Texas” accounts and articles about people or methods of travel from days gone by. Others are dedicated to trains and cars and the lore associated with two-wheeled machines, machines that fly, and machines that scream across the land at dangerous speeds. The volume concludes with articles that consider how we fuel our machines and ourselves, and the rituals we engage in when we’re on our way from here to there.
Date: 2017
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Folklore in Motion: Texas Travel Lore

Description: The adventurous spirit of Texans has led to much travel lore, from stories of how ancestors first came to the state to reflections of how technology has affected the customs, language, and stories of life “on the go.” This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society features articles from beloved storytellers like John O. West, Kenneth W. Davis, and F. E. Abernethy as well as new voices like Janet Simonds. Chapters contain traditional “Gone to Texas” accounts and articles about people or methods of travel from days gone by. Others are dedicated to trains and cars and the lore associated with two-wheeled machines, machines that fly, and machines that scream across the land at dangerous speeds. The volume concludes with articles that consider how we fuel our machines and ourselves, and the rituals we engage in when we’re on our way from here to there.
Date: December 15, 2007
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.