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Tales of Texas Cooking: Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos to the Piney Woods and High Plains to the Gulf Prairies

Description: According to Renaissance woman and Pepper Lady Jean Andrews, although food is eaten as a response to hunger, it is much more than filling one's stomach. It also provides emotional fulfillment. This is borne out by the joy many of us feel as a family when we get in the kitchen and cook together and then share in our labors at the dinner table. Food is comfort, yet it is also political and contested because we often are what we eat--meaning what is available and familiar and allowed. Texas is fortunate in having a bountiful supply of ethnic groups influencing its foodways, and Texas food is the perfect metaphor for the blending of diverse cultures and native resources. Food is a symbol of our success and our communion, and whenever possible, Texans tend to do food in a big way. This latest publication from the Texas Folklore Society contains stories and more than 120 recipes, from long ago and just yesterday, organized by the 10 vegetation regions of the state. Herein you'll find Senator Kay Bailey Hutchinson's Family Cake, memories of beef jerky and sassafras tea from John Erickson of Hank the Cowdog fame, Sam Houston's barbecue sauce, and stories and recipes from Roy Bedichek, Bob Compton, J. Frank Dobie, Bob Flynn, Jean Flynn, Leon Hale, Elmer Kelton, Gary Lavergne, James Ward Lee, Jane Monday, Joyce Roach, Ellen Temple, Walter Prescott Webb, and Jane Roberts Wood. There is something for the cook as well as for the Texan with a raft of takeaway menus on their refrigerator.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2015
Creator: Vick, Frances B.

Thirty-three Years, Thirty-three Works: Celebrating the Contributions of F. E. Abernethy, Texas Folklore Society Secretary-Editor, 1971-2004

Description: Francis Edward “Ab” Abernethy served as the Secretary-Editor of the Texas Folklore Society for over three decades, managing the organization’s daily operations and helping it grow. He edited two dozen volumes of the PTFS series and wrote the three volumes of the Society’s history. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society celebrates Ab Abernethy’s years of leadership in collecting, preserving, and presenting the folklore of Texas and the Southwest. The prefaces to some of the more memorable edited volumes are included, along with articles he wrote on music, teaching, anecdotes about historical figures and events, and “cultural” examinations of the things we hold dear. In all, these pieces tell us what was important to Ab. In part, these topics are also what was—and still is—important to the Texas Folklore Society. The contents include: Beginnings: the why and the how -- The way things were -- I'll sing you a song -- Reflections.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 2016
Creator: Untiedt , Kenneth L.; Mort, Kira E. & Abernethy, Francis Edward

Folklore: in All of Us, in All We Do

Description: Folklore is everywhere, whether you are aware of it or not. A culture’s traditional knowledge is used to remember the past and maintain traditions, to communicate with other members within a community, to learn, to celebrate, and to express creativity. It is what helps distinguish one culture from another. Although folklore is so much a part of our daily lives, we often lose sight of just how integral it is to everything we do. If we look for it, we can find folklore in places where we’d never think it existed. Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do includes articles on a variety of topics. One chapter looks at how folklore and history complement one another; while historical records provide facts about dates, places and names, folklore brings those events and people to life by making them relevant to us. Several articles examine the cultural roles women fill. Other articles feature folklore of particular groups, including oil field workers, mail carriers, doctors, engineers, police officers, horse traders, and politicians. As a follow-up article to Inside the Classroom (and Out), which focused on folklore in education, there is also an article on how teachers can use writing in the classroom as a means of keeping alive the storytelling tradition. The Texas Folklore Society has been collecting and preserving folklore since its first publication in 1912. Since then, it has published or assisted in the publication of nearly one hundred books on Texas folklore.
Date: December 15, 2006
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Death Lore: Texas Rituals, Superstitions, and Legends of the Hereafter

Description: Death provides us with some of our very best folklore. Some fear it, some embrace it, and most have pretty firm ideas about what happens when we die. Although some people may not want to talk about dying, it’s the only thing that happens to all of us–and there’s no way to get around it. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society examines the lore of death and whatever happens afterward. The first chapter examines places where people are buried, either permanently or temporarily. Chapter Two features articles about how people die and the rituals associated with funerals and burials. The third chapter explores some of the stranger stories about what happens after we’re gone, and the last chapter offers some philosophical musings about death in general, as well as our connection to those who have gone before.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: December 15, 2008
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Inside the Classroom (And Out): How We Learn Through Folklore

Description: Inside the Classroom (and Out) examines folklore and its many roles in education. Several articles explore teaching in rural school houses in the early twentieth century, while others provide insight into more serious academic scholarship in the field of folklore itself. One chapter looks at the “early years,” including works about day care centers, scout programs, children’s books, and the basic definition of what we mean by "folklore." Another chapter covers high school: cheerleading, football, yearbooks, and beliefs of Hispanic students. There is a chapter dedicated to Paul Patterson and his contribution to teaching; a chapter that covers college experiences, with stories about early Aggies, ghosts on university campuses, and collegiate cowgirls; and a chapter involving scholarly works, such as ways to help improve our memories, a linguistic study of cowboy poetry, and a comprehensive look at folklore studies.
Date: November 15, 2005
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

2001: A Texas Folklore Odyssey

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "is a journey or odyssey through the Texas Folklore Society as of the year 2001 A.D. It contains a sample of the research that members of the Society were doing at the turn of the millennium as represented at the 1998, 1999, and 2000 meetings." The volume covers "a wide variety of contemporary and historical topics," including baby lore, stories about notable women, stories about food and cooking, information about the Model T Ford, and more (inside front cover). The index begins on page 339.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

And Horns on the Toads

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society includes folk stories and tall tales about the horned toad and other Texas folklore. The index begins on page 235.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Backwoods to Border

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about folklore in Texas, including folk songs, ghost stories, Mexican animal tales, anecdotes about lawyers, folklore about Texas plants, riddles and miscellaneous legends. The index begins on page 225.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

The Golden Log

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular Texas folklore, including information about unusual Texas place names, folktales about spiders, folktales about witchcraft, ghosts and superstitions, and information about early petroleum geologists. The index begins on page 167.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

A Good Tale and a Bonnie Tune

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains miscellaneous folklore about Texas and Mexico, including Mexican folktales, Texas folk songs, information about Texas streams and information about racial discrimination in the South. The index begins on page 273.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Coffee in the Gourd

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a collection of miscellaneous folklore of Texas and Mexico, including folk songs, information about Indian pictographs, legends, superstitions, and weather lore. The index begins on page 105.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Corners of Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about folk music, folk arts and crafts, history of Texas, prominent Texas writers, and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 285.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Coyote Wisdom

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Mexico and Texas, including animal folk stories, Navajo creation myths, discussions about folk characters, discussions about the philosophy of folklore, and other miscellaneous folk stories. The index begins on page 293.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Diamond Bessie & The Shepherds

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including folk dramas, myths, folk music, stories about farming and agriculture, religious folk stories, and information about folk customs, dances and folk art. The index begins on page 157.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

The Family Saga: A Collection of Texas Family Legends

Description: The family saga—as Mody and this collection defines it—is made up of an accumulation of separate family legends. These are the stories of the old folks and the old times that are told among the family when they gather for funerals or Thanksgiving dinner. These are the "remember-when" stories the family tells about the time when the grownups were children.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward; Lincecum, Jerry Bryan & Vick, Frances B.

Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Folk Travelers: Ballads, Tales and Talk

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and Mexico, including traveling anecdotes, folk ballads, folklore in natural history, as well as information about black and white magic, Western animals, and cattle brands. The index begins on page 259.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Folklore: in All of Us, in All We Do

Description: Folklore is everywhere, whether you are aware of it or not. A culture’s traditional knowledge is used to remember the past and maintain traditions, to communicate with other members within a community, to learn, to celebrate, and to express creativity. It is what helps distinguish one culture from another. Although folklore is so much a part of our daily lives, we often lose sight of just how integral it is to everything we do. If we look for it, we can find folklore in places where we’d never think it existed. Folklore: In All of Us, In All We Do includes articles on a variety of topics. One chapter looks at how folklore and history complement one another; while historical records provide facts about dates, places and names, folklore brings those events and people to life by making them relevant to us. Several articles examine the cultural roles women fill. Other articles feature folklore of particular groups, including oil field workers, mail carriers, doctors, engineers, police officers, horse traders, and politicians. As a follow-up article to Inside the Classroom (and Out), which focused on folklore in education, there is also an article on how teachers can use writing in the classroom as a means of keeping alive the storytelling tradition. The Texas Folklore Society has been collecting and preserving folklore since its first publication in 1912. Since then, it has published or assisted in the publication of nearly one hundred books on Texas folklore.
Date: 2017
Creator: Untiedt, Kenneth L.

Both Sides of the Border: a Scattering of Texas Folklore

Description: Texas has a large population who has lived on both sides of the border and created a folkloric mix that makes Texas unique. Both Sides of the Border gets its name from its emphasis on recently researched Tex-Mex folklore. But we recognize that Texas has other borders besides the Rio Grande. We use that title with the folklorist’s knowledge that all of this state’s songs, tales, and traditions have lived and prospered on the other sides of Texas borders at one time or another before they crossed the rivers and became “ours.” Chapters are organized thematically, and include favorite storytellers like James Ward Lee, Thad Sitton, and Jerry Lincecum. Lee’s beloved “Hell is for He-Men” appears here, along with Sitton’s informative essay on Texas freedman’s settlements. Both Sides of the Border contains something to delight everyone interested in Texas folklore.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward & Untiedt, Kenneth L.

The Bounty of Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas, Mexican and Spanish folklore, including information about hunting, canning, cooking, and other folklore. The index begins on page 225.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward