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Some Still Do: Essays on Texas Customs

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a collection of essays about Texas folklore and customs, including information about cooking, woodworking, farming, festivals, folk music and other Texas folklore. The index begins on page 151.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Sonovagun Stew: A Folklore Miscellany

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular Texas folklore, including cowboy and gaucho songs, information about boat-making and other folk crafts, religious anecdotes, and other miscellaneous stories of early cowboy life in Texas. The index begins on page 165.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Southwestern Lore

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas and Mexican folklore, including folk stories about treasure hunters, cowboys, Native Americans, and razorback hogs, as well as myths, customs and other superstitions. The index of song material begins on page 192 and the general index begins on page 193.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

Spur-of-the-Cock

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas and Mexican folklore, including stories about the Mayo Indians, Mexican folk plays, folk songs, information about Texas cacti and other folklore. The index begins on page 110.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

Straight Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including tales about the origins of various cities and towns, personal anecdotes, songs, superstitions and other miscellaneous legends. The index begins on page 341.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank

The Sunny Slopes of Long Ago

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Western America, including ballads, cowboy stories, myths, folk songs and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 201.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

Texas and Southwestern Lore

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas and the Southwest, including ballads, cowboy songs, Native American myths, superstitions and other miscellaneous folk tales. It also contains the proceedings of the Texas Folklore Society. The index begins on page 243.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

Texas Folk Songs

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains musical scores, including Anglo-American love songs, ballads, comic songs, spirituals and party songs, as well as Afro-American spirituals and secular songs. The index begins on page 187.
Date: 2017
Creator: Owens, William A.

The Texas Folklore Society, 1909-1943: Volume 1

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "chronicles the collecting and publishing" of the Texas Folklore Society between the years of 1909 and 1943. It includes information about "public songs and ballads; superstitions, signs and omens; cures and peculiar customs; legends; dialects; games, plays and dances; riddles and proverbs" (inside front cover). The index begins on page 317.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Texas Folklore Society, 1943-1971: Volume 2

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "includes the publishing history of the [Texas Folklore Society] books, anecdotes about the gatherings of the Society...and the emphasis on singing beginning at Society gatherings" (inside the front cover). The index begins on page 311.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Texas Folklore Society, 1971-2000: Volume 3

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society includes information about the publishing history of the Texas Folklore Society. It also includes anecdotes about the gatherings of the Society, information about past presidents of the Society, and Society by-laws. The index begins on page 219.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Texas Toys and Games

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular toys and games relevant to the state of Texas, including folk toys, folk games, sports, dances, songs and other recreations. The index of contributors begins on page 245 and the index of toys and games begins on page 249.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Texian Stomping Grounds

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains sketches of post-war life in East Texas, including descriptions of early recreations and games, stories about Southern food and cooking, religious anecdotes, Negro folk tales, a first-hand account of a Negro folk play about the life of Christ, and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 159.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

Tire Shrinker to Dragster

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas, Jamaican and Irish folklore, including stories about drag racing, treasure hunting, frontier preachers, Irish storytellers, mock bidding in Jamaica, and more. The index begins on page 247.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

Tone the Bell Easy

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas and Mexican folklore, including folktales about witches, superstitions, slavery, folk cures, folk songs and other legends. The index begins on page 190.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

What's Going On? (In Modern Texas Folklore)

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains "a collection of essays by contemporary folklorists who are writing about the customs and traditions and the songs and the stories that are going on now" (inside the front cover). The volume includes information about the folklore of cowboys, rodeos, chain letters and marijuana, as well as information about country, swing and gospel music. The index begins on page 301.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Thirty-three Years, Thirty-three Works: Celebrating the Contributions of F. E. Abernethy, Texas Folklore Society Secretary-Editor, 1971-2004

Description: Francis Edward “Ab” Abernethy served as the Secretary-Editor of the Texas Folklore Society for over three decades, managing the organization’s daily operations and helping it grow. He edited two dozen volumes of the PTFS series and wrote the three volumes of the Society’s history. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society celebrates Ab Abernethy’s years of leadership in collecting, preserving, and presenting the folklore of Texas and the Southwest. The prefaces to some of the more memorable edited volumes are included, along with articles he wrote on music, teaching, anecdotes about historical figures and events, and “cultural” examinations of the things we hold dear. In all, these pieces tell us what was important to Ab. In part, these topics are also what was—and still is—important to the Texas Folklore Society. The contents include: Beginnings: the why and the how -- The way things were -- I'll sing you a song -- Reflections.
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Date: December 2016
Creator: Untiedt , Kenneth L.; Mort, Kira E. & Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Expense of a View

Description: The stories in The Expense of a View explore the psyches of characters under extreme duress. In the title story, a woman who has moved across the country in an attempt to leave her past behind dumps an empty suitcase into the Columbia River over and over again. In another story, a woman who wakes up mornings only to discover she's been shooting heroin in a night trance, meets her doppelganger on a rainy Oregon beach. Most of the characters are displaced and disturbed; they suffer from dissociative disorders, denial, and delusions. The settings—Florida, eastern Washington, Seattle, and the Oregon coast—mirror their lunacies. While refusing to look at what’s right in front of themselves might destroy them, it’s equally likely to be just what they need.The contents include: Honey -- Night train -- Void of course -- The expense of a view -- Three of swords -- Thinking about Carson -- Compliance -- My old man -- My doppelganger's arms -- Festival -- How to make an island -- Blue plastic shades -- The grandmother's vision -- The island of cats.
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Date: November 2016
Creator: Buckingham, Polly

Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Description: "The Byrd Williams Collection at the University of North Texas contains more than 10,000 prints and 300,000 negatives, accumulated by four generations of Texas photographers, all named Byrd Moore Williams. Beginning in the 1880s in Gainesville, the four Byrds photographed customers in their studios, urban landscapes, crime scenes, Pancho Villa's soldiers, televangelists, and whatever aroused their unpredictable and wide-ranging curiosity. When Byrd IV sat down to choose a selection from this dizzying array, he came face to face with the nature of mortality and memory, his own and his family's. In some cases these photos are the only evidence remaining that someone lived and breathed on this earth"--Amazon. The contents include: Foreword : One bright thread / Roy Flukinger -- Photographs : The family album -- Landscape -- Postcard -- The Great Depression -- Studio -- People -- Non-people -- Violence and religion in Texas -- Night -- Afterword : Palimpsest / Anne Wilkes Tucker.
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Date: November 2016
Creator: Williams, Byrd M., IV

Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

Description: Women in Civil War Texas is the first book dedicated to the unique experiences of Texas women during this time. It connects Texas women’s lives to southern women’s history and shares the diversity of experiences of women in Texas during the Civil War. Contributors explore Texas women and their vocal support for secession, coping with their husbands’ wartime absences, the importance of letter-writing, and how pro-Union sentiment caused serious difficulties for women. They also analyze the effects of ethnicity, focusing on African American, German, and Tejana women’s experiences. Finally, two essays examine the problem of refugee women in east Texas and the dangers facing western frontier women. The contents include: "Everyone has the war fever" / Vicki Betts -- Caroline Sedberry, politician's wife / Dorothy Ewing -- He said, she said / Beverly Rowe -- Finding joy through hard times / Brittany Bounds -- Black Texas women and the freedom war / Bruce A. Glasrud -- Black women and Supreme Court decisions during the Civil War era / Linda S. Hudson -- Mexican-Texan women in the Civil War / Jerry Thompson and Elizabeth Mata -- Courage on a Texas frontier / Judith Dykes-Hoffman -- "In favor of our fathers' country and government" / Rebecca Sharpless -- "They call us all renegades in Tyler" / Candice N. Shockley -- Not your typical Southern belles / Deborah M. Liles.
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Date: October 2016
Creator: Liles, Deborah M. & Boswell, Angela

No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

Description: Two family names have come to be associated with the violence that plagued Colorado County, Texas, for decades after the end of the Civil War: the Townsends and the Staffords. Both prominent families amassed wealth and achieved status, but it was their resolve to hold on to both, by whatever means necessary, including extra-legal means, that sparked the feud. Elected office was one of the paths to success, but more important was control of the sheriff’s office, which gave one a decided advantage should the threat of gun violence arise. No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell concentrates on those individual acts of private justice associated with the Stafford and Townsend families. It began with an 1871 shootout in Columbus, followed by the deaths of the Stafford brothers in 1890. The second phase blossomed after 1898 with the assassination of Larkin Hope, and concluded in 1911 with the violent deaths of Marion Hope, Jim Townsend, and Will Clements, all in the space of one month. The contents include: The murders of Bob and John Stafford at the hands of Larkin and Marion Hope -- The seven Townsend brothers (and one sister) of Texas -- Robert Earl Stafford -- The rise of Sam Houston Reese and the assassination of Larkin Hope -- The killings of Sam and Dick Reese -- The terrible affray at Bastrop and the shoot-out at Rosenberg -- The interim -- The 1906 skating rink shoot-out -- The assassination of Jim Coleman -- The deaths of Marion Hope, Will Clements, and Jim Townsend -- Postscript -- Conclusion -- Appendix A. Feud biographies -- Appendix B. Goeppinger interviews -- Appendix C. Report of Ranger Captain Sieker report -- Appendix D. Witness list Stelzig murder trial -- Endnotes.
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Date: September 2016
Creator: Kearney, James C.; Stein, Bill & Smallwood, James

Texan identities: moving beyond myth, memory, and fallacy in Texas history

Description: Texan Identities rests on the assumption that Texas has distinctive identities that define “what it means to be Texan,” and that these identities flow from myth and memory. What constitutes a Texas identity and how may such change over time? What myths, memories, and fallacies contribute to making a Texas identity? Are all the myths and memories that define Texas identity true or are some of them fallacious? Is there more than one Texas identity? The discussion begins with the idealized narrative and icons revolving around the Texas Revolution, most especially the Alamo. The Texas Rangers in myth and memory are also explored. Other essays expand on traditional and increasingly outdated interpretations of the Anglo-American myth of Texas by considering little known roles played by women, racial minorities, and specific stereotypes such as the cattleman. The contents include: Texan identities / Light Townsend Cummins and Mary L. Scheer -- Line in the sand, lines on the soul / Stephen L. Hardin -- Unequal citizens / Mary L. Scheer -- The Texas Rangers in myth and memory / Jody Edward Ginn -- On becoming Texans / Kay Goldman -- Ethel Tunstall Drought / Light Townsend Cummins -- W. W. Jones of South Texas / Patrick Cox -- Delgado v. Bastrop / Gene B. Preuss.
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Date: September 2016
Creator: Cummins, Light Townsend & Scheer, Mary L.

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s importance as more than just a “longhorn painter.” Reaugh’s works and far-reaching imagination earned him a prominent place in the Texas art pantheon.
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Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael

Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo

Description: Convict Cowboys is the first book on the nation’s first prison rodeo, which ran from 1931 to 1986. At its apogee the Texas Prison Rodeo drew 30,000 spectators on October Sundays. Mitchel P. Roth portrays the Texas Prison Rodeo against a backdrop of Texas history, covering the history of rodeo, the prison system, and convict leasing, as well as important figures in Texas penology including Marshall Lee Simmons, O.B. Ellis, and George J. Beto, and the changing prison demimonde. Over the years the rodeo arena not only boasted death-defying entertainment that would make professional cowboys think twice, but featured a virtual who’s who of American popular culture. Readers will be treated to stories about numerous American and Texas folk heroes, including Western film stars ranging from Tom Mix to John Wayne, and music legends such as Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. Through extensive archival research Roth introduces readers to the convict cowboys in both the rodeo arena and behind prison walls, giving voice to a legion of previously forgotten inmate cowboys who risked life and limb for a few dollars and the applause of free-world crowds. The contents include: Texas prisons: a pattern of neglect -- A cowboy's a man with guts and a hoss -- The Simmons years (1930-1935) -- The only show of its kind in the United States (1936-1939) -- The war years (1940-1946) -- A sad state of affairs (1947-1949) -- The West as it ought to have been (1950-1953) -- Outlaw vs. outlaw (1954-1959) -- The fund just appeared footloose and fancy free (1954-1960) -- The Texas Prison.
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Date: July 2016
Creator: Roth, Mitchel P.