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2001: A Texas Folklore Odyssey

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "is a journey or odyssey through the Texas Folklore Society as of the year 2001 A.D. It contains a sample of the research that members of the Society were doing at the turn of the millennium as represented at the 1998, 1999, and 2000 meetings." The volume covers "a wide variety of contemporary and historical topics," including baby lore, stories about notable women, stories about food and cooking, information about the Model T Ford, and more (inside front cover). The index begins on page 339.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Backwoods to Border

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about folklore in Texas, including folk songs, ghost stories, Mexican animal tales, anecdotes about lawyers, folklore about Texas plants, riddles and miscellaneous legends. The index begins on page 225.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

The Best of Texas Folk and Folklore: 1916-1954

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about folklore in Texas and Mexico, including folk songs and ballads, ghost stories, Mexican animal tales, sermons, stories about games and celebrations, folklore of Texas plants, and information about folk remedies. The index begins on page 349.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Coffee in the Gourd

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a collection of miscellaneous folklore of Texas and Mexico, including folk songs, information about Indian pictographs, legends, superstitions, and weather lore. The index begins on page 105.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Corners of Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including information about folk music, folk arts and crafts, history of Texas, prominent Texas writers, and other miscellaneous folklore. The index begins on page 285.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Coyote Wisdom

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Mexico and Texas, including animal folk stories, Navajo creation myths, discussions about folk characters, discussions about the philosophy of folklore, and other miscellaneous folk stories. The index begins on page 293.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Diamond Bessie & The Shepherds

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including folk dramas, myths, folk music, stories about farming and agriculture, religious folk stories, and information about folk customs, dances and folk art. The index begins on page 157.
Date: 2017
Creator: Hudson, Wilson M.

A Good Tale and a Bonnie Tune

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains miscellaneous folklore about Texas and Mexico, including Mexican folktales, Texas folk songs, information about Texas streams and information about racial discrimination in the South. The index begins on page 273.
Date: 2017
Creator: Boatright, Mody Coggin

Thirty-three Years, Thirty-three Works: Celebrating the Contributions of F. E. Abernethy, Texas Folklore Society Secretary-Editor, 1971-2004

Description: Francis Edward “Ab” Abernethy served as the Secretary-Editor of the Texas Folklore Society for over three decades, managing the organization’s daily operations and helping it grow. He edited two dozen volumes of the PTFS series and wrote the three volumes of the Society’s history. This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society celebrates Ab Abernethy’s years of leadership in collecting, preserving, and presenting the folklore of Texas and the Southwest. The prefaces to some of the more memorable edited volumes are included, along with articles he wrote on music, teaching, anecdotes about historical figures and events, and “cultural” examinations of the things we hold dear. In all, these pieces tell us what was important to Ab. In part, these topics are also what was—and still is—important to the Texas Folklore Society. The contents include: Beginnings: the why and the how -- The way things were -- I'll sing you a song -- Reflections.
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Date: December 2016
Creator: Untiedt , Kenneth L.; Mort, Kira E. & Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Expense of a View

Description: The stories in The Expense of a View explore the psyches of characters under extreme duress. In the title story, a woman who has moved across the country in an attempt to leave her past behind dumps an empty suitcase into the Columbia River over and over again. In another story, a woman who wakes up mornings only to discover she's been shooting heroin in a night trance, meets her doppelganger on a rainy Oregon beach. Most of the characters are displaced and disturbed; they suffer from dissociative disorders, denial, and delusions. The settings—Florida, eastern Washington, Seattle, and the Oregon coast—mirror their lunacies. While refusing to look at what’s right in front of themselves might destroy them, it’s equally likely to be just what they need.The contents include: Honey -- Night train -- Void of course -- The expense of a view -- Three of swords -- Thinking about Carson -- Compliance -- My old man -- My doppelganger's arms -- Festival -- How to make an island -- Blue plastic shades -- The grandmother's vision -- The island of cats.
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Date: November 2016
Creator: Buckingham, Polly

Proof: Photographs from Four Generations of a Texas Family

Description: "The Byrd Williams Collection at the University of North Texas contains more than 10,000 prints and 300,000 negatives, accumulated by four generations of Texas photographers, all named Byrd Moore Williams. Beginning in the 1880s in Gainesville, the four Byrds photographed customers in their studios, urban landscapes, crime scenes, Pancho Villa's soldiers, televangelists, and whatever aroused their unpredictable and wide-ranging curiosity. When Byrd IV sat down to choose a selection from this dizzying array, he came face to face with the nature of mortality and memory, his own and his family's. In some cases these photos are the only evidence remaining that someone lived and breathed on this earth"--Amazon. The contents include: Foreword : One bright thread / Roy Flukinger -- Photographs : The family album -- Landscape -- Postcard -- The Great Depression -- Studio -- People -- Non-people -- Violence and religion in Texas -- Night -- Afterword : Palimpsest / Anne Wilkes Tucker.
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Date: November 2016
Creator: Williams, Byrd M., IV

Women in Civil War Texas: Diversity and Dissidence in the Trans-Mississippi

Description: Women in Civil War Texas is the first book dedicated to the unique experiences of Texas women during this time. It connects Texas women’s lives to southern women’s history and shares the diversity of experiences of women in Texas during the Civil War. Contributors explore Texas women and their vocal support for secession, coping with their husbands’ wartime absences, the importance of letter-writing, and how pro-Union sentiment caused serious difficulties for women. They also analyze the effects of ethnicity, focusing on African American, German, and Tejana women’s experiences. Finally, two essays examine the problem of refugee women in east Texas and the dangers facing western frontier women. The contents include: "Everyone has the war fever" / Vicki Betts -- Caroline Sedberry, politician's wife / Dorothy Ewing -- He said, she said / Beverly Rowe -- Finding joy through hard times / Brittany Bounds -- Black Texas women and the freedom war / Bruce A. Glasrud -- Black women and Supreme Court decisions during the Civil War era / Linda S. Hudson -- Mexican-Texan women in the Civil War / Jerry Thompson and Elizabeth Mata -- Courage on a Texas frontier / Judith Dykes-Hoffman -- "In favor of our fathers' country and government" / Rebecca Sharpless -- "They call us all renegades in Tyler" / Candice N. Shockley -- Not your typical Southern belles / Deborah M. Liles.
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Date: October 2016
Creator: Liles, Deborah M. & Boswell, Angela

No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell: The Stafford-Townsend Feud of Colorado County, Texas, 1871-1911

Description: Two family names have come to be associated with the violence that plagued Colorado County, Texas, for decades after the end of the Civil War: the Townsends and the Staffords. Both prominent families amassed wealth and achieved status, but it was their resolve to hold on to both, by whatever means necessary, including extra-legal means, that sparked the feud. Elected office was one of the paths to success, but more important was control of the sheriff’s office, which gave one a decided advantage should the threat of gun violence arise. No Hope for Heaven, No Fear of Hell concentrates on those individual acts of private justice associated with the Stafford and Townsend families. It began with an 1871 shootout in Columbus, followed by the deaths of the Stafford brothers in 1890. The second phase blossomed after 1898 with the assassination of Larkin Hope, and concluded in 1911 with the violent deaths of Marion Hope, Jim Townsend, and Will Clements, all in the space of one month. The contents include: The murders of Bob and John Stafford at the hands of Larkin and Marion Hope -- The seven Townsend brothers (and one sister) of Texas -- Robert Earl Stafford -- The rise of Sam Houston Reese and the assassination of Larkin Hope -- The killings of Sam and Dick Reese -- The terrible affray at Bastrop and the shoot-out at Rosenberg -- The interim -- The 1906 skating rink shoot-out -- The assassination of Jim Coleman -- The deaths of Marion Hope, Will Clements, and Jim Townsend -- Postscript -- Conclusion -- Appendix A. Feud biographies -- Appendix B. Goeppinger interviews -- Appendix C. Report of Ranger Captain Sieker report -- Appendix D. Witness list Stelzig murder trial -- Endnotes.
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Date: September 2016
Creator: Kearney, James C.; Stein, Bill & Smallwood, James

Texan identities: moving beyond myth, memory, and fallacy in Texas history

Description: Texan Identities rests on the assumption that Texas has distinctive identities that define “what it means to be Texan,” and that these identities flow from myth and memory. What constitutes a Texas identity and how may such change over time? What myths, memories, and fallacies contribute to making a Texas identity? Are all the myths and memories that define Texas identity true or are some of them fallacious? Is there more than one Texas identity? The discussion begins with the idealized narrative and icons revolving around the Texas Revolution, most especially the Alamo. The Texas Rangers in myth and memory are also explored. Other essays expand on traditional and increasingly outdated interpretations of the Anglo-American myth of Texas by considering little known roles played by women, racial minorities, and specific stereotypes such as the cattleman. The contents include: Texan identities / Light Townsend Cummins and Mary L. Scheer -- Line in the sand, lines on the soul / Stephen L. Hardin -- Unequal citizens / Mary L. Scheer -- The Texas Rangers in myth and memory / Jody Edward Ginn -- On becoming Texans / Kay Goldman -- Ethel Tunstall Drought / Light Townsend Cummins -- W. W. Jones of South Texas / Patrick Cox -- Delgado v. Bastrop / Gene B. Preuss.
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Date: September 2016
Creator: Cummins, Light Townsend & Scheer, Mary L.

Rounded Up in Glory: Frank Reaugh, Texas Renaissance Man

Description: Frank Reaugh (1860–1945; pronounced “Ray”) was called “the Dean of Texas artists” for good reason. His pastels documented the wide-open spaces of the West as they were vanishing in the late nineteenth century, and his plein air techniques influenced generations of artists. His students include a “Who’s Who” of twentieth-century Texas painters: Alexandre Hogue, Reveau Bassett, and Lucretia Coke, among others. He was an advocate of painting by observation, and encouraged his students to do the same by organizing legendary sketch trips to West Texas. Reaugh also earned the title of Renaissance man by inventing a portable easel that allowed him to paint in high winds, and developing a formula for pastels, which he marketed. A founder of the Dallas Art Society, which became the Dallas Museum of Art, Reaugh was central to Dallas and Oak Cliff artistic circles for many years until infighting and politics drove him out of fashion. He died isolated and poor in 1945. The last decade has seen a resurgence of interest in Reaugh, through gallery shows, exhibitions, and a recent documentary. Despite his importance and this growing public profile, however, Rounded Up in Glory is the first full-length biography. Michael Grauer argues for Reaugh’s importance as more than just a “longhorn painter.” Reaugh’s works and far-reaching imagination earned him a prominent place in the Texas art pantheon.
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Date: August 2016
Creator: Grauer, Michael

Convict Cowboys: The Untold History of the Texas Prison Rodeo

Description: Convict Cowboys is the first book on the nation’s first prison rodeo, which ran from 1931 to 1986. At its apogee the Texas Prison Rodeo drew 30,000 spectators on October Sundays. Mitchel P. Roth portrays the Texas Prison Rodeo against a backdrop of Texas history, covering the history of rodeo, the prison system, and convict leasing, as well as important figures in Texas penology including Marshall Lee Simmons, O.B. Ellis, and George J. Beto, and the changing prison demimonde. Over the years the rodeo arena not only boasted death-defying entertainment that would make professional cowboys think twice, but featured a virtual who’s who of American popular culture. Readers will be treated to stories about numerous American and Texas folk heroes, including Western film stars ranging from Tom Mix to John Wayne, and music legends such as Johnny Cash and Willie Nelson. Through extensive archival research Roth introduces readers to the convict cowboys in both the rodeo arena and behind prison walls, giving voice to a legion of previously forgotten inmate cowboys who risked life and limb for a few dollars and the applause of free-world crowds. The contents include: Texas prisons: a pattern of neglect -- A cowboy's a man with guts and a hoss -- The Simmons years (1930-1935) -- The only show of its kind in the United States (1936-1939) -- The war years (1940-1946) -- A sad state of affairs (1947-1949) -- The West as it ought to have been (1950-1953) -- Outlaw vs. outlaw (1954-1959) -- The fund just appeared footloose and fancy free (1954-1960) -- The Texas Prison.
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Date: July 2016
Creator: Roth, Mitchel P.

Forging the Star: The Official Modern History of the United States Marshals Service

Description: What do diverse events such as the integration of the University of Mississippi, the federal trials of Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa, the confrontation at Ruby Ridge, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina have in common? The U.S. Marshals were instrumental in all of them. Whether pursuing dangerous felons in each of the 94 judicial districts or extraditing them from other countries; protecting federal judges, prosecutors, and witnesses from threats; transporting and maintaining prisoners and detainees; or administering the sale of assets obtained from criminal activity, the U.S. Marshals Service has adapted and overcome a mountain of barriers since their founding (on September 24, 1789) as the oldest federal law enforcement organization. In Forging the Star, historian David S. Turk lifts the fog around the agency’s complex modern period. From the inside, he allows a look within the storied organization. The research and writing of this singular account took over a decade, drawn from fresh primary source material with interviews from active or retired management, deputy U.S. marshals who witnessed major events, and the administrative personnel who supported them. Forging the Star is a comprehensive official history that will answer many questions about this legendary agency. The contents include: Origins of a modern agency -- The thirties and forties: roots of disparate duties -- The fifties: signs of a coming era -- Walking in fire: the 1960s in America -- Catalysts of change -- Focal points -- End of an era -- The seventies: moving beyond civil disturbance -- The new director -- The resurgence of protective operations -- Facing protest and peril -- Regionalization, Patty Hearst and Guam -- An evolution of leadership -- The eighties: redefinition -- Strike teams and high-profile prisoners -- The development of a golden age -- Unique enforcement operations -- The U.S. Marshals improvement revolution ...
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Date: July 2016
Creator: Turk, David S.

The Best American Newspaper Narratives, Volume 3

Description: This anthology collects the ten winners of the 2014 Best American Newspaper Narrative Writing Contest, run by the Mayborn Literary Nonfiction Conference. The event is hosted by the Frank W. Mayborn Graduate Institute of Journalism at the University of North Texas. The contest honors exemplary narrative work and encourages narrative nonfiction storytelling at newspapers across the United States. First place winner: Dan Barry, “The Boys in the Bunkhouse,” published by The New York Times, exposed thirty years of physical and mental abuse of intellectually disabled men living in an Iowa group home. Second place: Christopher Goffard, “The Favor,” published by the Los Angeles Times, describes the plea bargain sentence of the son of a former California assembly speaker, after the son pleaded guilty to voluntary manslaughter, and whose prison sentence was later reduced by then-California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger. Third place: Stephanie McCrummen, “A Father’s Scars,” published by the Washington Post, about a Virginia state senator one year after he was stabbed multiple times by his mentally ill son before the son killed himself. Runners-up include Nathan Bomey, John Gallagher and Mark Stryker, “How Detroit was Reborn” (Detroit Free Press); Monica Hesse, “Love and Fire” (Washington Post); Sarah Schweitzer, “Chasing Bayla” (Boston Globe); Sarah Kleiner Varble, “Then the Walls Closed In” (The Virginian Pilot); Joanne Kimberlin and Janie Bryant, “Dangerous Minds” (The Virginian Pilot); Molly Harbarger, “Fred Nelligan” (The Oregonian); and Mark Johnson, “Murray's Problem” (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel).
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Date: June 2016
Creator: Reaves, Gayle

Booker’s Point

Description: Bernard A. Booker, wry old Maine codger and unofficial mayor of Ell Pond, is the subject of Booker’s Point, an oral history-inspired portrait-in-verse. Weaving storytelling, natural history, and the poetry of place, the collection evokes the sensibility of rural New England and the pleasures of a good story.
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Date: April 2016
Creator: Grumbling, Megan

Whiskey River Ranger: The Old West Life of Baz Outlaw

Description: Captain Frank Jones, a famed nineteenth-century Texas Ranger, said of his company’s top sergeant, Baz Outlaw (1854-1894), “A man of unusual courage and coolness and in a close place is worth two or three ordinary men.” Another old-time Texas Ranger declared that Baz Outlaw “was one of the worst and most dangerous” because “he never knew what fear was.” But not all thought so highly of him. In Whiskey River Ranger, Bob Alexander tells for the first time the full story of this troubled Texas Ranger and his losing battle with alcoholism. In his career Baz Outlaw wore a badge as a Texas Ranger and also as a Deputy U.S. Marshal. He could be a fearless and crackerjack lawman, as well as an unmanageable manic. Although Baz Outlaw’s badge-wearing career was sometimes heroically creditable, at other times his self-induced nightmarish imbroglios teased and tested Texas Ranger management’s resoluteness. Baz Outlaw’s true-life story is jam-packed with fellows owning well-known names, including Texas Rangers, city marshals, sheriffs, and steely-eyed mean-spirited miscreants. Baz Outlaw’s tale is complete with horseback chases, explosive train robberies, vigilante justice (or injustice), nighttime ambushes and bushwhacking, and episodes of scorching six-shooter finality. Baz met his end in a brothel brawl at the hands of John Selman, the same gunfighter who killed John Wesley Hardin.
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Date: April 2016
Creator: Alexander, Bob

Raza Rising: Chicanos in North Texas

Description: Based on articles written for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, author Richard J. Gonzales draws on his educational, inner-city and professional life experiences to weave eyewitness testimony into issues facing Chicanos, including economic, health, education, criminal justice, politics, immigration, and cultural issues. Raza Rising offers first-hand observations, supported by well-documented scholarly research, of Chicanos’ growth and subsequent struggles to participate fully in North Texas’ political and economic life. Raza Rising takes the reader to the organization of an immigration reform march, to the actual march with 20,000 people, to a protest demonstration of the City of Farmers Branch’s attempt to prohibit renting to the undocumented immigrant, to the author’s awakening in Chicago on the importance of learning, and to his poignant experience as a guest speaker in a Fort Worth public school classroom.
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Date: March 2016
Creator: Gonzales, Richard J.

WASP of the Ferry Command: Women Pilots, Uncommon Deeds

Description: WASP of the Ferry Command is the story of the women ferry pilots who flew more than nine million miles in 72 different aircraft—115,000 pilot hours—for the Ferrying Division, Air Transport Command, during World War II. In the spring of 1942, Col. William H. Tunner lacked sufficient male pilots to move vital trainer aircraft from the factory to the training fields. Nancy Love found 28 experienced women pilots who could do the job. They, along with graduates of the Army’s flight training school for women—established by Jacqueline Cochran—performed this duty until fall 1943, when manufacture of trainers ceased. In December 1943 the women ferry pilots went back to school to learn to fly high-performance WWII fighters, known as pursuits. By January 1944 they began delivering high performance P-51s, 47s, and 39s. Prior to D-Day and beyond, P-51s were crucial to the air war over Germany. They had the range to escort B-17s and B-24s from England to Berlin and back on bombing raids that ultimately brought down the German Reich. Getting those pursuits to the docks in New Jersey for shipment abroad became these women’s primary job. Ultimately, more than one hundred WASP pursuit pilots were engaged in this vital movement of aircraft.
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Date: March 2016
Creator: Rickman, Sarah Byrn