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Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Folk Art in Texas

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains information about popular folk art of Texas, including basket weaving, hat-making, yard art, sculptures, murals, cemetery art, quilt-making, tattoo art, and other miscellaneous folk art. The index begins on page 198.
Date: 1985
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Folklore of Texan Cultures

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of various ethnic and religious groups residing in Texas, including songs, myths, legends, and other essays. The index begins on page 363.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

The Folklore of Texan Cultures

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of various ethnic and religious groups residing in Texas, including songs, myths, legends, and other essays. The index begins on page 363.
Date: 1974
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Fort Worth Characters

Description: Fort Worth history is far more than the handful of familiar names that every true-blue Fort Worther hears growing up: leaders such as Amon Carter, B. B. Paddock, J. Frank Norris, and William McDonald. Their names are indexed in the history books for ready reference. But the drama that is Fort Worth history contains other, less famous characters who played important roles, like Judge James Swayne, Madam Mary Porter, and Marshal Sam Farmer: well known enough in their day but since forgotten. Others, like Al Hayne, lived their lives in the shadows until one, spectacular moment of heroism. Then there are the lawmen, Jim Courtright, Jeff Daggett, and Thomas Finch. They wore badges, but did not always represent the best of law and order. These seven plus five others are gathered together between the covers of this book. Each has a story that deserves to be told. If they did not all make history, they certainly lived in historic times. The jury is still out on whether they shaped their times or merely reflected those times. Either way, their stories add new perspectives to the familiar Fort Worth story, revealing how the law worked in the old days and what life was like for persons of color and for women living in a man’s world. As the old TV show used to say, “There are a million stories in the ‘Naked City.’” There may not be quite as many stories in Cowtown, but there are plenty waiting to be told—enough for future volumes of Fort Worth Characters. But this is a good starting point.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: October 15, 2009
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.

A History of Fort Worth in Black & White 165 Years of African-American Life

Description: A History of Fort Worth in Black & White fills a long-empty niche on the Fort Worth bookshelf: a scholarly history of the city's black community that starts at the beginning with Ripley Arnold and the early settlers, and comes down to today with our current battles over education, housing, and representation in city affairs. The book's sidebars on some noted and some not-so-noted African Americans make it appealing as a school text as well as a book for the general reader. Using a wealth of primary sources, Richard Selcer dispels several enduring myths, for instance the mistaken belief that Camp Bowie trained only white soldiers, and the spurious claim that Fort Worth managed to avoid the racial violence that plagued other American cities in the twentieth century. Selcer arrives at some surprisingly frank conclusions that will challenge current politically correct notions. "Selcer does a great job of exploring little-known history about the military, education, sports and even some social life and organizations."--Bob Ray Sanders, author of Calvin Littlejohn: Portrait of a Community in Black and White.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: November 2015
Creator: Selcer, Richard F.

Rainbow in the Morning

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including work songs, reptile myths, ballads and other folk songs of the South. The index begins on page 185.
Date: 2017
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

Rainbow in the Morning

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains popular folklore of Texas, including work songs, reptile myths, ballads and other folk songs of the South. The index begins on page 185.
Date: 1975
Creator: Texas Folklore Society

The Texas Folklore Society, 1909-1943: Volume 1

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "chronicles the collecting and publishing" of the Texas Folklore Society between the years of 1909 and 1943. It includes information about "public songs and ballads; superstitions, signs and omens; cures and peculiar customs; legends; dialects; games, plays and dances; riddles and proverbs" (inside front cover). The index begins on page 317.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

The Texas Folklore Society, 1909-1943: Volume 1

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society "chronicles the collecting and publishing" of the Texas Folklore Society between the years of 1909 and 1943. It includes information about "public songs and ballads; superstitions, signs and omens; cures and peculiar customs; legends; dialects; games, plays and dances; riddles and proverbs" (inside front cover). The index begins on page 317.
Date: 1992
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Tone the Bell Easy

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas and Mexican folklore, including folktales about witches, superstitions, slavery, folk cures, folk songs and other legends. The index begins on page 190.
Date: 2017
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

Tone the Bell Easy

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains a miscellany of Texas and Mexican folklore, including folktales about witches, superstitions, slavery, folk cures, folk songs and other legends. The index begins on page 190.
Date: 1932
Creator: Dobie, J. Frank (James Frank), 1888-1964

What's Going On? (In Modern Texas Folklore)

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains "a collection of essays by contemporary folklorists who are writing about the customs and traditions and the songs and the stories that are going on now" (inside the front cover). The volume includes information about the folklore of cowboys, rodeos, chain letters and marijuana, as well as information about country, swing and gospel music. The index begins on page 301.
Date: 2017
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

What's Going On? (In Modern Texas Folklore)

Description: This volume of the Publications of the Texas Folklore Society contains "a collection of essays by contemporary folklorists who are writing about the customs and traditions and the songs and the stories that are going on now" (inside the front cover). The volume includes information about the folklore of cowboys, rodeos, chain letters and marijuana, as well as information about country, swing and gospel music. The index begins on page 301.
Date: 1976
Creator: Abernethy, Francis Edward

Written in Blood: the History of Fort Worth's Fallen Lawmen

Description: In 2010 Written in Blood: The History of Fort Worth’s Fallen Lawmen, Volume 1, told the stories of thirteen Fort Worth law officers who died in the line of duty between 1861 and 1909. Now Richard F. Selcer and Kevin S. Foster are back with Volume 2 covering another baker’s dozen line-of-duty deaths that occurred between 1910 and 1928. Not counting the two officers who died of natural causes, these are more tales of murder, mayhem, and dirty work from all branches of local law enforcement: police, sheriff’s deputies, constables, and special officers, just like in Volume 1. This era was, if anything, bloodier than the preceding era of the first volume. Fort Worth experienced a race riot, two lynchings, and martial law imposed by the U.S. Army while Camp Bowie was operating. Bushwhacking (such as happened to Peter Howard in 1915) and assassinations (such as happened to Jeff Couch in 1920) replaced blood feuds and old-fashioned shootouts as leading causes of death among lawmen. Violence was not confined to the streets either; a Police Commissioner was gunned down in his city hall office in 1917. Even the new category of “vehicular homicide” claimed a lawman’s life.
Access: This item is restricted to UNT Community Members. Login required if off-campus.
Date: October 15, 2011
Creator: Selcer, Richard F. & Foster, Kevin S.