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Ange

Description: Recording of Jean Piché's Ange for tape or radio performance. It is a timbral work in which the main goal is the total acoustic mixing of natural and synthetic sound material. In addition to the synthetic sounds that are created through a digital synthesizer, four voices - two men, two women - are introduced in the final mix and are hardly distinguishable from the synthetic sounds.
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Date: 1979
Creator: Piché, Jean

Anna

Description: Recording of John Edward Cousins's Anna. This piece is based on recordings made in 1974 at the ISME Research Seminar which took place at the Department of Music of the University of Canterbury. The subject of the seminar was Music and the Preschool-aged Child. Among the invited speakers were two specialists in the field of Musical Therapeutics. As an example of the power of musical sounds on an extremely retarded child, their article defends all therapeutic positive aspects inherent in musical nature. The composer tried to capture, by means of sound, the feeling of both joy and pain that the experience of music gives to a person, disabled or not.
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Date: 1974
Creator: Cousins, John Edward

Anna's Magic Garden

Description: Recording of Trevor Wishart's Anna's Magic Garden. It is an impressionist work that attempts to recreate the agitation of the world from the view of a three-year-old child. The voice is that of his daughter, Anne Ruth. The piece contains sounds both concrete and synthesized. Recorded over five weeks in the studios of San José State University and University of Texas, Austin.
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Date: 1982
Creator: Wishart, Trevor

Anticredos

Description: Recording of Trevor Wishart's Anticredos performed by Trevor Wishart. It is a live-performance piece for six amplified voices using extended vocal techniques, but no electronic modification of the voices. The piece, commissioned by the English group "Singcircle," takes the word "Credos" and slowly dissolves and changes its sound-constituents through processes of gradual transformation. This recording is a studio version of the piece "sung" entirely by the composer.
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Date: 1980
Creator: Wishart, Trevor

Any resemblance is purely coincidental

Description: Recording of Charles Dodge's "Any resemblance is purely coincidental" for tape. The piece aspires to represent the voice of Enrico Caruso in much the same way that Andy Warhol represented the figures of contemporary popular culture in his silk screen portraits: the voice is unmistakably that of Caruso, but with a difference. In "Any resemblance is purely coincidental," an operatic voice searches for an accompaniment: with the original orchestra, with copies of itself, with the piano, and with other computer sounds. The initial attempts are humorous; subsequently, other emotions are evoked until the loneliness of the "great performer" emerges. The voice is made with computer synthesis based on a 1907 recording of the aria "Vesti la giubba" from Ruggiero Leoncavallo's I Pagliacci sung by Enrico Caruso.
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Date: 1980
Creator: Dodge, Charles

L'approche de la lumière

Description: Recording of Daniel Arfib's L'approche de la lumière ("The Approach of the Light"). The piece functions as much as a sound experiment on the resonance of the vibrations as of sound as a concert piece. For the entire listening experience, pay particular attention to the quality of the silence before and after the performance.
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Date: 1980
Creator: Arfib, Daniel

Are we?

Description: Recording of Þorsteinn Hauksson's Are we? performed by Ensemble Intercontemporain under the direction of Fabrice Pierre. The piece if for two trumpets, two trombones, two percussionists, and tape. The message of the piece of music is unstated by the composer, but he says "music of the Muses can express it in a much clearer way" than spoken or written words.
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Date: 1981
Creator: Þorsteinn Hauksson

Arianna e Teseo

Description: Libretto of the opera seria "Arianna e Teseo" by Pietro Pariati. The story unfolds in the island of Crete where several young Athenian men are brought to be ritually sacrificed, and Athenian maidens are to be delivered as victims to a minotaur that lives in a labyrinth. Among the Athenians is Arianna, the daughter of Minos (Minosse), King of Crete, who was abducted as a child by King Aegeus, and Teseo, Aegeus's son. Teseo is determined to kill the minotaur in order to save Arianna's friend Laodice, but Arianna believes that he loves her friend. In spite of her doubts, she hands over to Teseo the secret how to kill the minotaur and vanquish Tauride, King Mino's champion, which she overheard from Minos. The work ends with Teseo's victory over the minotaur and his reconciliation with Arianna.
Date: 1764
Creator: Pariati, Pietro, 1665-1733

Armide

Description: Armide, which premiered at the Paris Opéra February 15, 1686, was the last tragédie lyrique on which Jean-Baptiste Lully collaborated with his favorite librettist, Philippe Quinault. Quinault retired from the stage after Armide, and Lully died a year later on March 22, 1687. From its first performance, Armide was considered their masterpiece. Armide is unusual among Lully and Quinault's tragédies lyriques in that it concentrates on the psychological development of a single character; the reflective style of this late work may be regarded as an early presentiment of trends toward individualism in art.
Date: 1686~
Creator: Lully, Jean Baptiste, 1632-1687 & Quinault, Philippe, 1635-1688

Armide: drame héroïque

Description: Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment.
Date: 1811
Creator: Gluck, Christoph Willibald, Ritter von, 1714-1787 & Quinault, Philippe, 1635-1688

Armide: Drame héroique, mis en musique

Description: Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment.
Date: 1783
Creator: Gluck, Christoph Willibald, Ritter von, 1714-1787

Armide: Drame héroique, mis en musique

Description: Armide was premiered at the Paris Opéra on September 23, 1777, recalling the earlier success of Lully’s opera of the same name, which premiered nearly a century earlier on February 15, 1686. After collaborating on several reform operas with Calzabigi, Gluck revived the older dramatic tradition of Quinault (Lully's librettist) by setting the older text in the modern musical style. The seventeenth-century five act model requires more continuous music, with few distinct arias, as well as divertissements and spectacular effects. Gluck also respects the tragic conclusion endemic to the model, avoiding the modern practice of the lieto fine ("happy ending") in which misfortunes are reversed at the last possible moment.
Date: 1783
Creator: Gluck, Christoph Willibald, Ritter von, 1714-1787

Armide : tragedie mise en musique

Description: Armide, which premiered at the Paris Opéra February 15, 1686, was the last tragédie lyrique on which Jean-Baptiste Lully collaborated with his favorite librettist, Philippe Quinault. Quinault retired from the stage after Armide, and Lully died a year later on March 22, 1687. From its first performance, Armide was considered their masterpiece. Armide is unusual among Lully and Quinault's tragédies lyriques in that it concentrates on the psychological development of a single character; the reflective style of this late work may be regarded as an early presentiment of trends toward individualism in art.
Date: 1686
Creator: Lully, Jean Baptiste, 1632-1687 & Quinault, Philippe, 1635-1688

Artaxerxes. An English opera.

Description: 1763 English libretto for Thomas Arne's opera Artaxerxes. Thomas Arne most likely wrote his own libretto for Artaxerxes, which enjoyed a successful run at Covent Garden beginning on 2 February 1762. Artaxerxes follows the structure of Metastasio’s Italian libretto on the same subject; no other English-language opera has been recognized as following the principles of Metastasian opera seria.
Date: 1763
Creator: Arne, Thomas Augustine, 1710-1778

[Arthur Godfrey and Gene Hall on The Talent Scout Show]

Description: Photographs of Arthur Godfrey and Gene Hall sitting together during NBC's "The Talent Scout Show" that have been attached to a sheet of white paper. The first five photos features the two middle aged men in dark suits, with Godfrey sitting to the left of the bespectacled Hall. Curtains are visible behind the two. A desk microphone sits between them. On the second page, below the two photos of Hall and Godfrey, there is a photo composed of four pictures. The the top two feature Godfrey and Hall again, while the bottom two feature George Mosse playing a clarinet (left) and George Mosse, Gene Murray playing a trumpet, and Phil Elliot playing a trombone. These three men are wearing striped black and white shirts.
Date: 1957

Arthur Godfrey Show - 1957

Description: Photographs of George Mosse (clarinet), Gene Murray (trumpet), and Phil Elliot (trombone) performing on the Arthur Godfrey Show while wearing striped shirts. The top left and bottom right photos show the three men playing together in front of a piano. The top right photo features Murray alone playing the clarinet. The photo on the bottom left contains four images. The top two images on this split photo show Arthur Godfrey (left) and Gene Hall (right) speaking together at a desk with a small microphone between them. The two photos underneath show two more images of Mosse, Murray, and Elliot performing together.
Date: 1957

Arthur Godfrey Talent Scouts - 1957

Description: Photographs of Arthur Godfrey and Gene Hall sitting together during NBC's "The Talent Scout Show" that have been attached to a sheet of white paper. The first five photos features the two middle aged men in dark suits, with Godfrey sitting to the left of the bespectacled Hall. Curtains are visible behind the two. A desk microphone sits between them.
Date: 1957