UNT Music Library - Browse

ABOUT BROWSE FEED
Atys : tragedie mise en musique
Atys, which premiered on 10 January 1676, is the first of the tragédies lyriques of Jean-Baptiste Lully and Philippe Quinault to have a tragic ending. As the Prologue indicates, the tragedie itself is a divertissement to ease the king's mind of his impending duties. Joyce Newman, in Jean-Baptiste de Lully and his Tragédie Lyriques, summarizes the message of the story in this way: "In [Atys], Quinault shows how actions which are not in accord with the noble ideal will bring defeat and punishment. Not only is love in opposition to glory in this opera, but also it is shown that if love is place more highly than honor, it will bring unhappiness even to one of the immortals."
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 3
This is a copy of the third volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1883, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "P" (Planché, James Robinson) to "S" (the title of the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in"). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[v]-vii, signed "29 Bedford Street, Covent Garden, July, 1883." The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes.
Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Volume 4
This is a copy of the fourth volume of "Dictionary of Music and Musicians," edited by Sir George Grove. This volume, published in 1890, is an encyclopedic work that contains the biographies of well-known composers as well as articles contributed by various authors on music topics, concepts and definitions starting alphabetically from: "S" (continuation of the article about the Medieval rota, "Sume is icumen in" that appears on vol. 3) to "Z" (starting with the singer, Zur Mühlen, Raimund von). The names of contributing authors appear in a list on pp.[vi]-xi. The titles of volumes I and II, indicate that the dictionary was issued in three volumes. However, the titles of the third and fourth volumes changed that statement to indicate that the publication of the dictionary was in four volumes.
Storia della musica
This is a copy of the second of three volumes of "Storia della musica" (Music History) by Giovanni Batista Martini. Each volume bears a different dedicatee: v.1: alla Sacra reale cattolica Maestà Maria Barbara; v.2: All'Altezza serenissima elettorale di Carlo Teodoro; v.3: a sua Altezza reale Don Ferdinando di Borbone. The t.p. of this volume is printed in red and black ink and decorated with a border that depicts various musical instruments. It also features an illustration of a minotaur and a young boy (presumably, the god Apollo) holding a lyre. This volume is divided in nine chapters and three dissertations. The start of each chapter and each dissertation features, within an ornamented oval-shaped frame, the notated music of a canon in a five-line staff with underlaid text taken from works by Hesiod, Homer, Anacreon, and Sophocles. The book contains maps of Greece and Asia Minor, as well as a table that summarizes the divisions of the breve and prolations translated to 18th century musical notation practice. Chapter 1 discusses the origins of music according to precepts passed down from antiquity and Greece as well as the theory of musical intervals. Chapter 2 discusses several Greek mythological figures and a history of the invention of the lyre per Homer. It also mentions Greek authors and use of instruments in Greek festivities. Chapter 3 presents stories of Greek gods and demigods by Ovid and Homer, among others. Chapter 4 includes Virgil's story of Orpheus (the son of Apollo) and his attempted rescue of his dead wife Eurydice from Hades. The chapter contains references to the role of music in that story. Chapter 5 is about the role of music in the cult of Cybele (in Greek mythology, the mother of all gods). It also mentions names of people mentioned by Plutarch ...
Thetis et Pelée; tragédie en musique
Pascal Collasse was one of the few opera composers able to secure successful performances in the years following Lully’s death. Collasse then went on to supply the music for the entire opera, Thétis et Pélée, which was premiered at the Paris Opéra on 11 January 1689. Thétis remained popular throughout Collasse’s lifetime, in spite of its rather weak plot. Owing to its success is primarily the music, including a significant storm scene in Act II. This departure from the Lullian tradition is perhaps Collasse’s most significant contribution to the tradition of French opera.
Atys : tragédie lyrique en trois actes
The story of Atys was first known operatically through Lully’s opera that premiered in 1676 at the court of St Germain-en-Laye. Marmontel adapted Quinault’s libretto and modified it by removing the prologue and divertissements. He also altered the plot; in lieu of Ovid’s metamorphic ending (to which Quinault had adhered), Atys commits suicide.
School of Music Program Book 1946-1947
Fall/Spring performances program book from the 1946-1947 school year at the North Texas State College School of Music.
Recueil d'opera
Collection of opera excerpts in manuscript (in an unidentified hand).
Iphigenie en Aulide; tragédie. Opera en trois actes
Although he did not have a production planned, Gluck composed the music for Iphigénie en Aulide for Paris, with the intention (along with Roullet) of establishing himself at the Opéra. He initially had difficulties convincing the Academy of Music to arrange for the production, but with the support of Marie Antoinette, the opera was finally realized in 1773. Gluck revised Iphigénie for performances in 1775. The most significant change was the addition of Diana as a character, whose appearance serves as the deus ex machina of the plot. He also altered and expanded the divertissements.
Stan Kenton with unknown female fan
Photograph of Stan Kenton with unknown female fan. He is holding onto a microphone stand and has his arm around the woman, who is wearing all black. An instrument and people are partially visible behind them.
[Stan Kenton with Barry Ulanov]
Photograph of Stan Kenton with Barry Ulanov (editor of Metronome magazine), seated on a couch at Carnegie Hall. Kenton is smoking a cigarette.
[Stan Kenton and company at the Schirmer opening]
Photograph of Stan Kenton and six other men at the November 1946 Schirmer opening in Brooklyn, N.Y. They are standing around a water cooler, from left to right: Murray Boykin, Walter Rivere, Lou Ferrara, John Cooney, Stan Kenton, and Al Levine.
[Kenton Orchestra rehearsal]
Photograph of the Stan Kenton Orchestra in band rehearsal.
[Kenton at record store with fans]
Photograph of Stan Kenton at a record store surrounded by a large group of fans. Behind him, there are shelves full of records and displayed photographs.
[Stan Kenton and friends]
Photograph of Stan Kenton with two unidentified men.
[Kenton band pictorial for Metronome Magazine]
Pictorial date for Metronome magazine, taken at Cafe Rouge, Hotel Penn. in New York, NY. (The band was playing nightly nearby at the Paramount Theatre during this period).
[Stan Kenton and friend]
Photograph of Stan Kenton and an unidentified man.
[Stan Kenton at record store]
Photograph of Stan Kenton selling record albums in a store. A group of people are gathered around his table and Kenton is standing in front of a wall of shelves full of albums.
[Kenton Orchestra at Carnegie Hall - 2]
Photograph of Stan Kenton band fans entering Carnegie Hall before the concert.
[Kenton recording session of "New Concepts of Artistry in Rhythm"]
Photograph of the recording session for "New Concepts of Artistry in Rhythm," done by Capitol Records in Chicago, IL. Pictured, from left to right are: Stan Kenton, unknown, Frank Rosolino, Don Bagley, and conductor Johnny Richards.
[Kenton band rehearsal at Virginia Polytechnical Institute - 2]
Photograph of a Kenton band rehearsal, probably taken at Virginia Polytechnical Institute in Blackburg, VA.
College of Music program book 2005-2006 Ensemble & Other Performances Vol. 1
Ensemble performances program book from the 2005-2006 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
[Downbeat Award Ceremony]
Photograph of the Progressive Jazz Orchestra at Downbeat Award ceremony. June Christy (with husband Bob Cooper) is presented the Downbeat Award by the magazine's West Coast editor Charles Emge. Center photos: Mexican singer Paco who also performed on this live KLAC telecast at the Hollywood Palladium.
Faculty Recital: 2007-01-24 - Julia Bushkova, violin; Steven Harlos, piano
A faculty recital performed at the UNT College of Music Concert Hall.
College of Music program book 1998-1999 Ensemble Performances Vol. 2
Ensemble performances program book from the 1998-1999 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2000-2001 Ensemble Performances Vol. 2
Ensemble performances program book from the 2000-2001 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2002-2003 Ensemble Performances Vol. 1
Ensemble performances program book from the 2002-2003 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 1998-1999 Student Performances
Student performances program book from the 1998-1999 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2001-2002 Ensemble Performances Vol. 1
Ensemble performances program book from the 2001-2002 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2001-2002 Student Performances Vol. 2
Student performances program book from the 2001-2002 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2000-2001 Ensemble Performances Vol. 1
Ensemble performances program book from the 2000-2001 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2002-2003 Ensemble Performances Vol. 2
Ensemble performances program book from the 2002-2003 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2001-2002 Ensemble Performances Vol. 2
Ensemble performances program book from the 2001-2002 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 2003-2004 Student Performances Vol. 1
Student performances program book from the 2003-2004 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
Guest Artist Recital: 2009-02-26 - Dave Brubeck Quartet
Jazz concert performed at the UNT College of Music Winspear Hall.
Colonie : opéra comique en deux actes
No Description Available.
Ensemble: 2007-04-22 - UNT Opera
Opera concert performed at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater.
Ensemble: 2007-04-20 - UNT Opera
Opera concert performed at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater.
Ensemble: 2007-04-13 - UNT Opera
Opera concert performed at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater.
Ensemble: 2007-04-15 - UNT Opera
Opera concert performed at the UNT College of Music Lyric Theater.
Barbe bleue : comédie en prose et en trois actes
Although the story of Bluebeard was familiar to French readers from Charles Perrault’s 1698 collection of children’s tales, transferring it to the operatic stage was problematic due in large part to the gruesome nature of the plot. Other violent works had appeared in Paris, but in this instance, the drama was to be performed at the Comédie-Italienne, which typically featured lighter plots than that of Raoul and Isaure. Nevertheless, the opera had a successful run, receiving over a hundred performances in the decade after its premiere. After its initial popularity, Raoul Bluebeard was staged less frequently, but it still made an impression on nineteenth-century composers, particularly Weber.
Ensemble and Guest Artist: 2012-04-06 - Jazz Singers I and Vertical Voices Live!
A jazz choir concert performed at the UNT College of Music Voertman Hall.
College of Music program book 2000-2001 Student Performances Vol. 2
Student performances program book from the 2000-2001 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
Echo et Narcisse, drame lyrique en trois actes
After the resounding success of Iphigénie en Tauride (1779), Gluck set out to compose his last of the seven Paris operas, which turned out to be his final opera. Whereas Iphigénie en Tauride is often considered Gluck’s best opera, its immediate successor, Echo et Narcisse (1779) was ill-fated and quickly disappeared from the repertoire. Echo was premiered a mere four months after Tauride, and the Parisian audience was not prepared for the differences between these two operas. Although the music resembles that of his other French operas, the pastoral story lacks the dramatic intensity that viewers expected in a Gluck opera. Thus, the serene music—though it is at times quite beautiful— lacks dramatic impulse.
College of Music program book 1989-1990 Vol. 2
Fall/Spring performances program book from the 1989-1990 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
Le trompeur trompe, ou, La rencontre imprevue. Opera-comique en un acte. Represente pour la premiere fois sur le Theatre de la Foire S. Germain, le 18 fevrier 1754.
In the mid-eighteenth century, comic opera librettos served a dual purpose, as evinced by the libretto to Vadé ’s Trompeur trompé (1754). Although the primary function of the publication was to allow audience members to follow along with the text of the opera, solo airs were printed in the back of the book. Not all the melodies are included, but those printed in the libretto enhance our understanding of an opera the music of which was never published as a comprehensive musical score.
College of Music program book 1994-1995 Student Performances Vol. 2
Student performances program book from the 1994-1995 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
Orphée et Euridice; tragédie; opéra en trois actes
The Viennese premiere of Orfeo was extremely well received, and Gluck decided to revise the opera as Orphée et Eurydice for Paris in 1774, with the French adaptation and additions provided by Pierre Louis Moline. The role of Orpheus was lowered slightly for an haute-contre singer (a male operatic voice type more in line with an alto range), adhering to French preferences. The opera was lengthened, to create a more magnificent spectacle, with extra arias, ensembles, and instrumental numbers. Gluck also modified the orchestration to accommodate the orchestra at the Académie Royale de Musique. This version, Orphée et Eurydice, became one of the most popular operas in France.
College of Music program book 1989-1990 Vol. 1
Fall/Spring performances program book from the 1989-1990 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.
College of Music program book 1988-1989 Vol. 1
Fall/Spring performances program book from the 1988-1989 school year at the University of North Texas College of Music.