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CYCLOPETIDE ALKALOIDS. SYNTHETIC, SPECTROSCOPIC AND CONFORMATIONAL STUDIES OF PHENCYCLOPEPTINE MODEL COMPOUNDS

Description: Peptide cyclization via the p-nitrophenyl ester of 4-methyl-3-[4'-{beta}-N-(N'-tert-butyloxycarbonyl-L~prolyl)-aminoethyl]phenoxy-pentanoic acid (9) has afforded a single cyclopeptide diastereomer,9R-isopropyl-5S,6-trimethylene-8-dearnino-1,2-dihydro-p-phencyclopeptine (4), in 36% yield. From the comparative analysis of the UV, IR, CD, and {sup 1}H NMR spectra of 4 and cyclopeptide 5S,6-trimethylene 8-deamino-1,2-dihydro-p-phencyclopeptine (3d), of known geometry, the conformational identities of the 14-membered ring systems were ascertained. From these data the assignment of R stereochemistry at C9 for cyclopeptide 4 was deduced. Since the stereochemistry at C9 in the naturally occurring phencyclopeptines is the same, these results suggest a feasible route to the stereoselective total synthesis of the phencyclopeptines.
Date: May 1, 1980
Creator: Goff, Dane; Lagarias, J. Clark; Shih, Willy C.; Klein, Melvin P. & Rapoport, Henry
Item Type: Article

Cyclotron Produced Radionuclides for Diagnosis and Therapy of Human Neoplasms

Description: This project funded since 1986 serves as a core project for cancer research throughout MSKCC, producing key radiotracers as well as basic knowledge about thel physics of radiation decay and imaging, for nuclear medicine applications to cancer diagnosis and therapy. In recent years this research application has broadened to include experiments intended to lead to an improved understanding of cancer biology and into the discovery and testing of new cancer drugs. Advances in immune based radiotargeting form the basis for this project. Both antibody and cellular based immune targeting methods have been explored. The multi-step targeting methodologies (MST) developed by NeoRex (Seattle,Washington), have been adapted for use with positron emitting isotopes and PET allowing the quantification and optimization of targeted delivery. In addition, novel methods for radiolabeling immune T-cells with PET tracers have advanced our ability to track these cells of prolonged period of time.
Date: September 21, 2009
Creator: MD, Steven Larson
Item Type: Report

Cyclotron resonance and quasiparticles

Description: This introductory paper contains personal perspectives about the importance of cyclotron resonance in forming our modern view of solids. The papers following this one will discuss the discovery, refinements, and some of the latest developments. Although I will touch on some of these subjects, I leave the details to the other authors and in the main focus on the conceptual impact of the work. I propose that it was experiments based on cyclotron resonance which established the quasiparticle concept.
Date: January 15, 2005
Creator: Cohen, Marvin L.
Item Type: Article

Cyclotron Resonances in Electron Cloud Dynamics

Description: A new set of resonances for electron cloud dynamics in the presence of a magnetic field has been found. For short beam bunch lengths and low magnetic fields where lb<< 2pi c/omega c (with lb = bunch length, omega c = non-relativistic cyclotron frequency) resonances between the bunch frequency and harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency cause an increase in the electron cloud density in narrow ranges of magnetic field near the resonances. For ILC parameters the increase in the density is up to a factor ~;;3, and the spatial distribution of the electrons is broader near resonances, lacking the well-defined vertical density"stripes" found for non-resonant cases. Simulations with the 2D computer code POSINST, as well as a single-particle tracking code, were used to elucidate the physics of the dynamics. The existence of the resonances has been confirmed in experiments at PEP-II. The resonances are expected to affect the electron cloud dynamics in the fringe fields of conventional lattice magnets and in wigglers, where the magnetic fields are low. Results of the simulations and experimental observations, the reason for the bunch-length dependence, and details of the dynamics are discussed here.
Date: April 29, 2009
Creator: Celata, C. M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Ng, J. S.T.; Grote, D. P.; Pivi, M. T. F. et al.
Item Type: Article

Cygnus Diverter Switch Analysis

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two 2.25-MV, 60-kA, 50-ns x-ray sources fielded in an underground laboratory at the Nevada Test Site. The tests performed in this laboratory involve study of the dynamic properties of plutonium and are called subcritical experiments. From end-to-end, the Cygnus machines utilize the following components: Marx generator, water-filled pulse-forming line (PFL), waterfilled coaxial transmission line (WTL), 3-cell inductive voltage adder (IVA), and rod-pinch diode. The upstream WTL interface to the PFL is via a radial insulator with coaxial geometry. The downstream WTL terminates in a manifold where the center conductor splits into three lines which individually connect to each of the IVA cell inputs. There is an impedance mismatch at this juncture. It is a concern that a reflected pulse due to anomalous behavior in the IVA or diode might initiate breakdown upon arrival at the upstream PFL/WTL insulator. Therefore near the beginning of the WTL a radial diverter switch is installed to protect the insulator from over voltage and breakdown. The diverter has adjustable gap spacing, and an in-line aqueous-solution (sodium thiosulfate) resistor array for energy dissipation. There are capacitive voltage probes at both ends of the WTL and on the diverter switch. These voltage signals will be analyzed to determine diverter performance. Using this analysis the usefulness of the diverter switch will be evaluated.
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton et al.
Item Type: Article

Cygnus History

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site. The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images for dynamic plutonium experiments. This work will recount and discuss salient maintenance and operational issues encountered during the history of Cygnus. A brief description of Cygnus systems and rational for design selections will set the stage for this historical narrative. It is intended to highlight the team-derived solutions for technical problems encountered during extended periods of maintenance and operation. While many of the issues are typical to pulsed power systems, some of the solutions are unique. It is hoped that other source teams will benefit from this presentation, as well as other necessary disciplines (e.g., source users, system architects, facility designers and managers, funding managers, and team leaders).
Date: July 2, 2009
Creator: David J. Henderson, Raymond E. Gignac, Douglas E. Good, Mark D. Hansen, Charles V. Mitton; Daniel S. Nelson, Eugene C. Ormond; Steve R. Cordova, Isidro Molina & John R. Smith, Evan A. Rose
Item Type: Article

Cygnus Performance in Subcritical Experiments

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources with the following specifications: 4-rad dose at 1 m, 1-mm spot size, 50-ns pulse length, 2.25-MeV endpoint energy. The facility is located in an underground tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site. Here SubCritical Experiments (SCEs) are performed to study the dynamic properties of plutonium. The Cygnus sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for these tests. Since SCEs are single-shot, high-value events - reliability and reproducibility are key issues. Enhanced reliability involves minimization of failure modes through design, inspection, and testing. Many unique hardware and operational features were incorporated into Cygnus to insure reliability. Enhanced reproducibility involves normalization of shot-to-shot output also through design, inspection, and testing. The first SCE to utilize Cygnus, Armando, was executed on May 25, 2004. A year later, April - May 2005, calibrations using a plutonium step wedge were performed. The results from this series were used for more precise interpretation of the Armando data. In the period February - May 2007 Cygnus was fielded on Thermos, which is a series of small-sample plutonium shots using a one-dimensional geometry. Pulsed power research generally dictates frequent change in hardware configuration. Conversely, SCE applications have typically required constant machine settings. Therefore, while operating during the past four years we have accumulated a large database for evaluation of machine performance under highly consistent operating conditions. Through analysis of this database Cygnus reliability and reproducibility on Armando, Step Wedge, and Thermos is presented.
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, S. Lutz, C. Mitton, et al.
Item Type: Article

Cygnus PFL Switch Jitter

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources: Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following X-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rads at 1 m, 50-ns full-widthhalf-maximum. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are Marx generator, water-filled pulse forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, threecell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance may be jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the source X-ray spectrum and dose. Therefore, PFL switch jitter may contribute to shot-to-shot variation in these parameters, which are crucial to radiographic quality. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and present the correlation with dose. For this analysis, the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting, which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition the PFL switch performance for one larger switch gap setting will be examined.
Date: July 21, 2007
Creator: C. Mitton, G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, et al.
Item Type: Article

Cygnus Trigger System

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.
Date: February 1, 2008
Creator: G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton
Item Type: Article

Cygnus Water Switch Jitter

Description: The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two identical radiographic sources - Cygnus 1 and Cygnus 2. Each source has the following x-ray output: 1-mm diameter spot size, 4 rad at 1 m, 50-ns Full Width Half Max. The diode pulse has the following electrical specifications: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This Radiographic Facility is located in an underground tunnel test area at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The sources were developed to produce high-resolution images on subcritical tests which are performed at NTS. Subcritical tests are single-shot, high-value events. For this application, it is desirable to maintain a high level of reproducibility in source output. The major components of the Cygnus machines are: Marx generator, water-filled pulse–forming line (PFL), water-filled coaxial transmission line, three-cell inductive voltage adder, and rod-pinch diode. A primary source of fluctuation in Cygnus shot-to-shot performance is jitter in breakdown of the main PFL switch, which is a “self-break” switch. The PFL switch breakdown time determines the peak PFL charging voltage, which ultimately affects the diode pulse. Therefore, PFL switch jitter contributes to shot-to-shot variation in source endpoint energy and dose. In this paper we will present PFL switch jitter analysis for both Cygnus machines and give the correlation with diode performance. For this analysis the PFL switch on each machine was maintained at a single gap setting which has been used for the majority of shots at NTS. In addition to this analysis, PFL switch performance for different switch gap settings taken recently will be examined. Lastly, implications of source jitter for radiographic diagnosis of subcritical shots will be discussed.
Date: March 1, 2008
Creator: Charles V. Mitton, George D. Corrow, Mark D. Hansen, David J. Henderson, et al.
Item Type: Article

Cygnus X-3 revisited: 10 years of muon and radio observations.

Description: The Soudan 2 deep underground tracking calorimeter has recorded cosmic ray muon tracks from the direction of the galactic x-ray binary Cygnus X-3 on most transits during the interval 1989-1998. We analyze these events in the context of previous reports of Cygnus X-3-related muon flux during major radio flares of that source. We find some evidence for excess flux during a small number of transits coincident with major radio flares. We also find an indication that these events maybe distributed around the source with a Gaussian point spread function with {sigma} = 1.3{degree}, larger than the instrumental angular spread of < 0.3{degree}, verified by observation of the shadow of the moon.
Date: June 23, 1999
Creator: Allison, W. W. M.; Alner, G. J.; Ayres, D. S.; Barrett, W. L.; Bode, C.; Fields, T. H. et al.
Item Type: Article

Cylinder supplied ammonia scrubber testing in IDMS

Description: This report summarizes the results of the off-line testing the Integrated DWPF Melter System (IDMS) ammonia scrubbers using ammonia supplied from cylinders. Three additional tests with ammonia are planned to verify the data collected during off-line testing. Operation of the ammonia scrubber during IDMS SRAT and SME processing will be completed during the next IDMS run. The Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) scrubbers were successful in removing ammonia from the vapor stream to achieve ammonia vapor concentrations far below the 10 ppM vapor exit design basis. In most of the tests, the ammonia concentration in the vapor exit was lower than the detection limit of the analyzers so results are generally reported as <0.05 parts per million (ppM). During SRAT scrubber testing, the ammonia concentration was no higher than 2 ppM and during SME testing the ammonia concentration was no higher than 0.05 m.
Date: August 31, 1994
Creator: Lambert, D.P.
Item Type: Report

Cylinder-temperature correlation of a single-cylinder liquid-cooled engine

Description: An analysis based on nonboiling forced-convection heat-transfer theory is made of the cooling processes in liquid-cooled engine cylinders. Semiempirical equations that relate the average head and barrel temperatures with the primary engine and coolant parameters are derived. A correlation method based on these equations is applied to data obtained from previously reported investigations, which were conducted over large ranges of engine and coolant conditions with two liquid-cooled cylinders using water and various aqueous ethylene glycol solutions as coolants. Upon evaluation of empirical factors, an equation for the cylinder-head temperature as a function of the engine operating conditions and the flow rate, temperature, and physical properties of the coolants is obtained, which represents the data with good accuracy.
Date: January 1, 1946
Creator: Pinkel, Benjamin; Manganiello, Eugene J & Bernardo, Everett
Item Type: Report