UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 6,316 Matching Results

Search Results

Acceleration Measurements During Landing in Rough Water of a 1/7-Scale Dynamic Model of Grumman XJR2F-1 Amphibian - Langley Tank Model 212, TED No. NACA 2378

Description: Tests of a 1/7 size model of the Grumman XJR2F-1 amphibian were made in Langley tank no.1 to examine the landing behavior in rough water and to measure the normal and angular accelerations experienced by the model during these landings. All landings were made normal to the direction of wave advance, a condition assumed to produce the greatest accelerations. Wave heights of 4.4 and 8.0 inches (2.5 and 4.7 ft, full size) were used in the tests and the wave lengths were varied between 10 and 50 feet (70 and 350 ft, full size). Maximum normal accelerations of about 6.5g were obtained in 4.4 inch waves and 8.5g were obtained in 8.0 inch waves. A maximum angular acceleration corresponding to 16 radians per second per second, full size, was obtained in the higher waves. The data indicate that the airplane will experience its greatest accelerations when landing in waves of about 20 feet (140 ft, full size) in length.
Date: May 6, 1947
Creator: Land, Norman S. & Zeck, Howard

Acceleration Measurements During Landings of a 1/5.5-Size Dynamic Model of the Columbia XJL-1 Amphibian in Smooth Water and in Waves: Langley Tank Model 208M, TED No. NACA 2336

Description: A 1/5.5-size powered dynamic model of the Columbia XJL-1 amphibian was landed in Langley tank no. 1 in smooth water and in oncoming waves of heights from 2.1 feet to 6.4 feet (full-size) and lengths from 50 feet to 264 feet (full-size). The motions and the vertical accelerations of the model were continuously recorded. The greatest vertical acceleration measured during the smooth-water landings was 3.1g.
Date: September 25, 1947
Creator: Clement, Eugene P. & Havens, Robert F.

Accuracy of airspeed measurements and flight calibration procedures

Description: From Summary: "The sources of error that may enter into the measurement of airspeed by pitot-static methods are reviewed in detail together with methods of flight calibration of airspeed installations. Special attention is given to the problem of accurate measurements of airspeed under conditions of high speed and maneuverability required of military airplanes." (author).
Date: 1948
Creator: Huston, Wilber B

Acute Exposure to Polonium. (Medical Study of Three Human Cases)

Description: Three individuals were inadvertently exposed to polonium. Activity determinations on the routine weekly urine samples submitted by the individuals revealed counts of 174, 734, and 2190 c/min/50 ml respectively. An investigation was immediately launched to determine the source of the exposure, since there was no report of a spill or accident involving active material. By the process of elimination, the time of exposure was narrowed down to a time when two of the individuals were engaged in the denitration of a polonium solution in a small kettie inside a hood when a leak developed in the kettle. The active solution was transferred from the kettle to a carboy. All three individuals were present during the transfer period. Two wore respirators, rubber gloves, and smocks over their coveralls while the third stood well behind and watched the procedure. However, it was concluded that an inhalation exposure resulted. A medical study of each case was instituted and data are summarized. No immediate toxic effects were observed. (C.H.)
Date: March 1, 1948
Creator: Naimark, D. H.

Adaptor for measuring principal strains with Tuckerman strain gage

Description: Report discussing an adapter which uses three Tuckerman optical strain gages to measure the displacement of the three vortices of an equilateral triangle along lines 120 degrees apart. These displacements are substituted in well-known equations in order to compute the magnitude and direction of the principal strains. Tests of the adaptor indicate that principal strains over a gage length of 1.42 inch may be measured with a systematic error not exceeding 4 percent and a mean observational error of the order of + or minus 0.000006. The maximum observed error in strain was of the order of 0.00006. The directions of principal strains for unidirectional stress were measured with the adaptor with an average error of the order of 1 degree.
Date: June 1943
Creator: Mcpherson, A E

Addition of heat to a compressible fluid in motion

Description: From Introduction: "The purpose of this report is to summarize, without extended proofs, the results of a study of a simplified model of nonadiabiatic, compressible fluid flow, both subsonic and supersonic, and to state these results in a form that will make them immediately useful in providing a theoretical background for current technical problems of high-speed combustion.
Date: February 1945
Creator: Hicks, Bruce L

Additional abstracts pertaining to seaplanes

Description: From Summary: "About 500 additional references pertaining to hydrodynamic design of seaplanes have been compiled, and the information is presented in the form of abstracts classified under six main headings:GENERAL INFORMATION, HYDROSTATICS, HYDRODYNAMICS, AERODYNAMICS, OPERATION, and RESEARCH. The compilation is an extension of NACA RM No. L6I13, entitled "Abstracts Pertaining to Seaplanes," by Jerold M. Bidwell and Douglas A. King. An author index and a subject index are included."
Date: March 9, 1948
Creator: Bidwell, J. M. & King, D. A.

Additional free-flight tests of the rolling effectiveness of several wing-spoiler arrangements at high subsonic, transonic, and supersonic speeds

Description: From Introduction: "The purpose of the present paper is to present results obtained recently relating to the characteristics of a full-span sharp-edge spoiler with an 0.02-chord projection above the wing surface at several chordwise positions and also to the relative effectiveness of the sharp-edge spoiler and a wedge-type spoiler located at the 80-percent-chord line."
Date: November 24, 1948
Creator: Strass, H Kurt

The additional-mass effect of plates as determined by experiments

Description: From Introduction: "The apparent increase in the inertia properties of a body moving in a fluid medium has been called the additional-mass effect. This report presents a resume of test procedures and results of experimental determinations of the additional-mass effect of flat plates. In addition to data obtained from various foreign sources and from a NACA investigation in 1933, the results of tests recently conducted by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics are included."
Date: 1941
Creator: Gracey, William