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Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X24C-4B Turbojet Engine. IV - Performance of Modified Compressor, Part 4, Performance of Modified Compressor

Description: The performance of the 11-stage axial-flow compressor, modified to improve the compressor-outlet velocity, in a revised X24C-4B turbojet engine is presented and compared with the performance of the compressor in the original engine. Performance data were obtained from an investigation of the revised engine in the MACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. Compressor performance data were obtained for engine operation with four exhaust nozzles of different outlet area at simulated altitudes from 15,OOO to 45,000 feet, simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.24 to 1.07, and engine speeds from 4000 to 12,500 rpm. The data cover a range of corrected engine speeds from 4100 to 13,500 rpm, which correspond to compressor Mach numbers from 0.30 to 1.00.
Date: December 22, 1947
Creator: Thorman, H. Carl & Dupree, David T.

Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X24C-4B Turbojet Engine. V - Performance of Modified Engine, V, Performance of Modified Engine

Description: An investigation has been conducted in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel to evaluate the performance characteristics of a modified X24C-4B turbojet engine over a range of simulated altitudes from 5000 to 45,000 feet, simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.25 to 1.07, and engine speeds from 4000 to 12,500 rpm. The engine was modified by the manufacturer to improve the velocity and temperature profiles within the engine. Performance data are graphically presented to show the effect of altitude at a flight Mach number of 0.25 and the effect of flight Mach number at an altitude of 25,000 feet. Original and modified engine performances for several specific operating conditions are compared. A complete tabulation of average pressures and temperatures throughout the engine, performance data, and lubrication and fuel-system data is presented.
Date: January 1, 1947
Creator: Prince, William R. & Bloomer, Harry E.

Preliminary Results of Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of X34C-4B Turbojet Engine. III - Compressor Performance, 3, Compressor Performance

Description: The performance of the 11-stage axial-flow compressor in the X24C-4B turbojet engine was analyzed on the basis of results obtained from an investigation of the complete engine in the NACA Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. The engine was operated with four, exhaust nozzles of different outlet area over a range of engine speeds from 6000 to 12,500 rpm, corrected engine speeds from approximately 6100 to 13,600 rpm, and compressor Mach numbers from 0.45 to 1.00. Data are presented for engine operation over a range of simulated altitudes from 15,000 to 45,000 feet and simulated flight Mach numbers from 0.24 to 1.08.
Date: December 12, 1947
Creator: Dupree, David T. & Thorman, H. Carl

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 3, Pressure and Temperature Distributions

Description: An altitude-wind-tunnel investigation of a TG-100A gas turbine-propeller engine was performed. Pressure and temperature data were obtained at altitudes from 5000 to 35000 feet, compressor inlet ram-pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.17, and engine speeds from 800 to 13000 rpm. The effect of engine speed, shaft horsepower, and compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio on pressure and temperature distribution at each measuring station are presented graphically.
Date: November 13, 1947
Creator: Geisenheyner, Robert M. & Berdysz, Joseph J.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 4, Compressor and Turbine Performance Characteristics

Description: As part of an investigation of the performance and operational characteristics of the TG-100A gas turbine-propeller engine, conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel, the performance characteristics of the compressor and the turbine were obtained. The data presented were obtained at a compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio of 1.00 for altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm, and turbine-inlet temperatures from 1400 to 2100R. The highest compressor pressure ratio was 6.15 at a corrected air flow of 23.7 pounds per second and a corrected turbine-inlet temperature of 2475R. Peak adiabatic compressor efficiencies of about 77 percent were obtained near the value of corrected air flow corresponding to a corrected engine speed of 13,000 rpm. This maximum efficiency may be somewhat low, however, because of dirt accumulations on the compressor blades. A maximum adiabatic turbine efficiency of 81.5 percent was obtained at rated engine speed for all altitudes and turbine-inlet temperatures investigated.
Date: November 13, 1947
Creator: Wallner, Lewis E. & Saari, Martin J.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine II - Windmilling Characteristics

Description: An investigation was conducted to determine the operational and performance characteristics of the TG-100A gas turbine-propeller engine II. Windmilling characteristics were deterined for a range of altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, true airspeeds from 100 to 273 miles per hour, and propeller blade angles from 4 degrees to 46 degrees.
Date: August 4, 1947
Creator: Conrad, E. W. & Durham, J. D.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of a TG-100A Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, V, Combustion-Chamber Characteristics

Description: An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of the TG-1OOA gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet rm-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and.correcte& horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, over-all total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, ana the frac%ional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. The scatter of combustion- efficiency data tended to obscure any effect of altitude or ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horse-powers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio an& the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horse-powers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.
Date: December 31, 1947
Creator: Gensenheyner, Robert M. & Berdysz, Joseph J.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 1, Performance Characteristics

Description: A preliminary investigation of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine was conduxted. Performance data were obtained for engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm and altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet and compressor inlet ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.17.
Date: August 2, 1948
Creator: Saari, Martin J. & Wallner, Lewis E.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 2, Windmilling Characteristics

Description: Wind tunnel investigations were performed to determine the performance properties of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine II. Windmilling characteristics were determined for a range of altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, true airspeeds from 100 to 273 miles per hour, and propeller blade angles from 4 degrees to 46 degrees.
Date: August 3, 1948
Creator: Conrad, E. W. & Durham, J. D.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 3, Pressure and Temperature Distributions

Description: Performance properties and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine were determined. Data are presented for a range of simulated altitudes from 5,000 to 35,0000 feet, compressor inlet- ram pressure ratios from 1.00 to 1.17, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm.
Date: August 2, 1948
Creator: Geisenheyner, Robert M. & Berdysz, Joseph J.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 4, Compressor and Turbine Performance Characteristics

Description: As part of an investigation of the performance and operational characteristics of the axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine, conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel, the performance characteristics of the compressor and the turbine were obtained. The data presented were obtained at a compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio of 1.00 for altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm, and turbine-inlet temperatures from 1400 to 2100 R. The highest compressor pressure ratio obtained was 6.15 at a corrected air flow of 23.7 pounds per second and a corrected turbine-inlet temperature of 2475 R. Peak adiabatic compressor efficiencies of about 77 percent were obtained near the value of corrected air flow corresponding to a corrected engine speed of 13,000 rpm. This maximum efficiency may be somewhat low, however, because of dirt accumulations on the compressor blades. A maximum adiabatic turbine efficiency of 81.5 percent was obtained at rated engine speed for all altitudes and turbine-inlet temperatures investigated.
Date: August 10, 1948
Creator: Wallner, Lewis E. & Saari, Martin J.

Preliminary Results of an Altitude-Wind-Tunnel Investigation of an Axial-Flow Gas Turbine-Propeller Engine, 5, Combustion-Chamber Characterisitcs

Description: An investigation to determine the performance and operational characteristics of an axial-flow gas turbine-propeller engine was conducted in the Cleveland altitude wind tunnel. As part of this investigation, the combustion-chamber performance was determined at pressure altitudes from 5000 to 35,000 feet, compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratios of 1.00 and 1.09, and engine speeds from 8000 to 13,000 rpm. Combustion-chamber performance is presented as a function of corrected engine speed and corrected horsepower. For the range of corrected engine speeds investigated, overall total-pressure-loss ratio, cycle efficiency, and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers were unaffected by a change in altitude or compressor-inlet ram-pressure ratio. For the range of corrected horsepowers investigated, the total-pressure-loss ratio and the fractional loss in cycle efficiency resulting from pressure losses in the combustion chambers decreased with an increase in corrected horsepower at a constant corrected engine speed. The combustion efficiency remained constant for the range of corrected horsepowers investigated at all corrected engine speeds.
Date: August 6, 1948
Creator: Geisenheyner, Robert M. & Berdysz, Joseph J.

Preliminary results of an investigation at transonic speeds to determine the effects of a heated propulsive jet on the drag characteristics of a related series of afterbodies

Description: Preliminary results are presented from an investigation to determine the influence of afterbody geometry on the effects of a sonic propulsive jet at transonic speeds. The results presented are base pressure coefficient and afterbody pressure-drag coefficient as a function of jet pressure ratio for different values of Mach number and jet temperature. Geometric parameters investigated include boattail angle, jet-to-model diameter ratio, and jet-to-base diameter ratio.
Date: March 25, 1955
Creator: Henry, Beverly Z , Jr & Cahn, Maurice S

Preliminary Results of an Investigation by the Wing-Flow Method of the Longitudinal Stability Characteristics of a 1/50-Scale Semispan Model of the McDonnell XP-88 Airplane

Description: This paper presents the results of measurements of longitudinal stability of a 1/50-scale model of the XP-88 airplane by the wing-flow method. Lift, rolling-moment, hinge-moment, and pitching-moment characteristics as well as the downwash at the tail were measured over a Mach number range from approximately 0.5 to 1.05 at Reynolds numbers below 1,000,000. No measurements of drag were obtained. No abrupt changes due to Mach number were noted in any of the parameters measured. The data indicated that the wing was subject to early tip stalling; that the tail effectiveness decreased gradually with increasing Mach number up to M = 0.9, but increased again at higher Mach numbers; that the variation of downwash with angle of attack did not change appreciably with Mach number except between 0.95 and 1.0 where d(epsilon)/d(alpha), decreased from 0.46 to 0.32; that at zero lift with a stabilizer setting of -1.5 deg there was a gradually increasing nosing-up tendency with increasing Mach number; and that the control-fixed stability in maneuvers at constant speed gradually increased with increasing Mach number.
Date: June 9, 1948
Creator: Crane, Harold L.

Preliminary Results of British Nene II Engine Altitude-Chamber Performance Investigation. I - Altitude Performance Using Standard 18.75-Inch-Diameter Jet Nozzle, 1, Altitude Performance Using Standard 18.75-Inch-Diameter Jet Nozzle

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the altitude performance characteristics of the British Nene II engine and its components. The present paper presents the preliminary results obtained using a standard jet nozzle. The test results presented are for conditions simulating altitudes from sea level to 60,000 feet and ram pressure ratios from 1.0 to 2.3. These ram pressure ratios correspond to flight Mach numbers between zero and 1.16 assuming a 100 percent ram recovery.
Date: May 24, 1948
Creator: Barson, Zelmar & Wilsted, H. D.

Preliminary Results of Cyclical De-Icing of a Gas-Heated Airfoil

Description: An NACA 65(sub 1)-212 airfoil of 8-foot chord was provided with a gas-heated leading edge for investigations of cyclical de-icing. De-icing was accomplished with intermittent heating of airfoil segments that supplied hot gas to chordwise passages in a double-skin construction. Ice removal was facilitated by a spanwise leading-edge parting strip which was continuously heated from the gas-supply duct. Preliminary results demonstrate that satisfactory cyclical ice removal occurs with ratios of cycle time to heat-on period (cycle ratio) from 10 to 26. For minimum runback, efficient ice removal, and minimum total heat input, short heat-on periods of about 15 seconds with heat-off periods of 260 seconds gave the best results. In the range of conditions investigated, the prime variables in the determination of the required heat input for cyclical ice removal were the air temperature and the cycle ratio; heat-off period, liquid water content, airspeed, and angle of attack had only secondary effects on heat input rate.
Date: January 24, 1952
Creator: Gray, V. H.; Bowden, D. T. & VonGlahn, U.

Preliminary Results of Heat Transfer from a Stationary and Rotating Ellipsoidal Spinner

Description: Convective heat-transfer coefficients in dry air were obtained for an ellipsoidal spinner of 30-inch maximum diameter for both stationary and rotating operation over a range of conditions including airspeeds up to 275 miles per hour, rotational speeds up to 1200 rpm, and angles of attack of zero and 40 The results are presented in terms of Nusselt numbers, Reynolds numbers, and convective heat-transfer coefficients. The studies included both uniform heating densities over the spinner and uniform surface temperatures.. In general, the results showed that rotation will increase the convective heat transfer from a spinner, especially in the turbulent-flow regions. Rotation of the spinner at 1200 rpm and at a free-stream velocity of 275 miles per hour increased the Nusselt number parameter in the turbulent-flow region by 32 percent over that obtained with a stationary spinner; whereas in the nose region, where the flow was laminar, an increase of only 18 percent was observed. Transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurred over a large range of Reynolds numbers primarily because of surface roughness of the spinner. Operation at an angle of attack of 40 had only small effects on the local convective heat transfer for the model studied.
Date: August 6, 1953
Creator: vonGlahn, U.

Preliminary Results of Nene II Engine Altitude-chamber Performance Investigation, 2, Altitude Performance using 18.41-inch Diameter-jet Nozzle

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the altitude performance characteristics of the Nene II engine and its components. The present paper presents preliminary results obtained using a jet nozzle of 18.41 inches in diameter, giving an area equal to 96.4 percent of the area of the standard jet nozzle of this engine. The test results presented are for conditions simulating altitudes from seal level to 50,000 feet and ram-pressure ratios from 1.00 to 2.70. The ram pressure ratios correspond to flight Mach numbers between zero and 1.28.
Date: January 1, 1948
Creator: Armstron, J. C.; Wilsted, H. D. & Vincent, K. R.

Preliminary Results of Nene II Engine Altitude-chamber Performance Investigation, 3, Altitude Performance using 18.00-inch-diameter Jet Nozzle

Description: An investigation is being conducted to determine the altitude performance characteristics of the Nene II engine and its components. The present paper presents the preliminary results obtained using jet nozzle 18.00 inches in diameter, with an area equal to 92.2 percent of the area of the standard jet nozzle for this engine. The experimental results presented are for conditions simulating altitudes from 20,000 to 60,000 feet and ram-pressure ratios from 1.1 to 3.5. These ram-pressure ratios correspond to flight Mach numbers between 0.374 and 1.466. Data obtained with the 18.00 inch-diameter jet nozzle and corrected to standard sea-level conditions showed substantially the same trends with altitude as the data previously obtained with an 18.75-inch-diameter nozzle and with an 18.41-inch-diameter nozzle. Jet thrust, air consumption, and fuel consumption, corrected to standard sea-level conditions, increased rapidly with increasing ram-pressure ratio. In general, corrected net thrust specific fuel consumption increased with increase in ram-pressure ratio. Corrected net thrust decreased with an increase in ram-pressure ratio at an engine speed of 8000 rpm. At corrected engine speeds between 8000 and 10,800 rpm, net thrust first decreased with an increase in ram-pressure ratio and then increased with further increase in ram pressure ratio; at corrected engine speeds above 10,800 rpm, net thrust increased continuously with increase in ram-pressure ratio. Tail-pipe temperature decreased with an increase in ram-pressure ratio.
Date: August 6, 1948
Creator: Grey, Ralph E. & Brightwell, virginia L.