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Programming in Fortran M
Fortran M is a small set of extensions to Fortran that supports a modular approach to the construction of sequential and parallel programs. Fortran M programs use channels to plug together processes which may be written in Fortran M or Fortran 77. Processes communicate by sending and receiving messages on channels. Channels and processes can be created dynamically, but programs remain deterministic unless specialized nondeterministic constructs are used. Fortran M programs can execute on a range of sequential, parallel, and networked computers. This report incorporates both a tutorial introduction to Fortran M and a users guide for the Fortran M compiler developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The Fortran M compiler, supporting software, and documentation are made available free of charge by Argonne National Laboratory, but are protected by a copyright which places certain restrictions on how they may be redistributed. See the software for details. The latest version of both the compiler and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/fortran-m at info.mcs.anl.gov.
Programming in Fortran M Revision 1
Fortran M is a small set of extensions to Fortran that supports a modular approach to the construction of sequential and parallel programs. Fortran M programs use channels to plug together processes which may be written in Fortran M or Fortran 77. Processes communicate by sending and receiving messages on channels. Channels and processes can be created dynamically, but programs remain deterministic unless specialized nondeterministic constructs are used. Fortran M programs can execute on a range of sequential, parallel, and networked computers. This report incorporates both a tutorial introduction to Fortran M and a users guide for the Fortran M compiler developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The Fortran M compiler, supporting software, and documentation are made available free of charge by Argonne National Laboratory, but are protected by a copyright which places certain restrictions on how they may be redistributed. See the software for details. The latest version of both the compiler and this manual can be obtained by anonymous ftp from Argonne National Laboratory in the directory pub/fortran-m at info.mcs.anl.gov.
Progress in Airborne Radioactivity Surveying
From abstract: The objectives in the investigation of airborne radioactivity surveying during fiscal year 1951 were: 1) Establishment of a routine technique of airborne radioactivity surveying -- completed by incorporating those phases of the aeromagnetic surveying technique that were applicable; 2) Development of automatic correction of the radiation measurement for variation in distance from source -- achieved by using the radar altimeter output to modify the output of the counting-rate meter in accordance with the observed variation of radiation intensity with distance from a source; 3) Development of more efficient radiation detectors -- including large scintillation detectors.
Progress in Environmental Specimen Banking
In October, 1986, the 10th U.S.-German Seminar of State and Planning on Environmental Specimen Banking was held at the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences in Gloucester Point, Virginia. At this meeting the current status of specimen banking activities in the U. S., FRG, Canada, and Japan was presented and discussed. This publication contains the proceedings of that meeting with contributions describing various activities related to banking and analysis of samples from aquatic, atmospheric, terrestrial, and human monitoring programs.
Progress in Nondestructive Testing: A Summary of Hanford Achievements in These Programs Under General Electric, 1952 - 1964
Report discussing the development of Hanford Laboratories' nondestructive testing programs and a summary of their results. Programs include AlSi fuel testing, N-Reactor fuel testing, and reactor research and development.
Progress made in the construction of giant airplanes in Germany during the war
The construction of giant airplanes was begun in Germany in August, 1914. The tables annexed here show that a large number of airplanes weighing up to 15.5 tons were constructed and tested in Germany during the War, and it is certain that no other country turned out airplanes of this weight nor in such large numbers. An examination of the tables shows that by the end of the War all the manufacturers had arrived at a well-defined type, namely an airplane of about 12 tons with four engines of 260 horsepower each. The aircraft listed here are discussed with regard to useful weight and aerodynamic qualities.
Progress of Surveys in the Anthracite Ridge District Alaska
From abstract: Anthracite Ridge is in south-central Alaska, on the north side of the Matanuska River Valley, about 200 miles north of Seward, the coastal terminus of the Alaska Railroad. The specific object of the investigations in this field during the summer of 1931 was to collect information regarding the character and extent of the anthracite deposits. These studies were carried on in connection with similar intensive studies of deposits of other kinds of minerals throughout the country tributary to the Alaska Railroad.
Progress on Geologic Studies in the Capitol Reef Area, Wayne and Garfield Counties, Utah
From introduction: Objectives of the geologic studies and mapping in this area are: 1) to study and map geologic formations in which uranium ore may be found with special attention given to the Triassic Shinarump conglomerate, 2) to evaluate uranium deposits and to study local controls and habits of ore, 3) to collect and study geologic data basic to an understanding of regional geologic trends or controls in the distribution of the ore deposits, and 4) to determine the favorableness of the area for concealed deposits of uranium. The present report does not attempt to provide answers to all these objectives. Rather, it is a brief explanatory report to accompany the geologic map (fig. 2) and make it available in advance of the final report.
Progress Report on AEC Contract on Research and Development Program on Scintillation Crystals: Period 1 January 1956 to 1 April 1956
From Abstract: "This report covers the preliminary literature survey and the screening of activated cesium iodide and several alkali halides to qualitatively determine their luminerscence. The report also includes a proposal of the future work and a proposed budget for the 1957 fiscal year."
Progress report on fatigue of spot-welded aluminum
No Description Available.
Progress Report on Gamma-Ray Logging Activities
Abstract: An evaluation is made of radioactivity logging as applied to exploration drilling on the Colorado Plateau. The compilation of data gives a preliminary insight into the possibilities of the technique being applied.
Progress Report on Geologic Studies in the Capitol Reef Area, Wayne County, Utah
From abstract: During 1951 about 60 square miles of the Capitol Reef area, Wayne County, Utah, the northern end of the Waterpocket Fold, was mapped by plane-table methods on a scale of 1:62, 500. Formations, with an approximate aggregate thickness of 3, 200 feet, range from the Coconino sandstone of Permian age to the Navajo sandstone of Jurassic (?) age. About 35 linear miles of Shinarump conglomerate of Triassic age was examined in detail. Cliffs 900 to 1, 000 feet high form the west face of Capitol Reef, which is on the east and northeast flanks of a structural and topographic dome, The uranium deposits are in the basal part of the Shinarump conglomerate. Zippeite and metatorbernite are the uranium minerals found, and are associated with copper minerals, carbonaceous matter, clay beds, a thick bleached zone at the top of the Moenkopi formation, and channels or scours in the top of the Moenkopi. The highest radioactivity is in a clay bed at the base of the Shinarump conglomerate, and was detected at 7 localities between Grand Wash and Capitol Gorge, at the Birch Spring prospect in Moonie Draw, and at the Oyler mine in Grand Wash.
Progress Report on Investigations of Western Phosphate Deposits
From abstract: A comprehensive investigation of the western phosphate deposits, in progress since 1947, involves a study of the Phosphoria and Park City formations over an area of about 135,000 square miles in the states of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, and Utah0 It was undertaken to acquire more data on the thickness, composition and quality, structure, and distribution of the deposits--data that would help industry select deposits suitable for mining and permit estimation of reserves, evaluation of potential byproduct elements, and establishment of the origin of the deposits.
Progress Report on Loading of Titanium with Deuterium
Report issued by the University of California Radiation Laboratory discussing an experiment in which a system was designed and built to load titanium with deuterium gas of a high purity. It discusses the results and the parameters affecting the amounts and purity of the absorbed gas.
Progress report on strength and creep of special ceramic bodies in tension at elevated temperatures
No Description Available.
Progress Report on the Argonne-Oak Ridge Digital Computer
Report issued by the Argonne National Laboratory discussing a progress report on the Argonne-Oak Ridge digital computer. This report is an interim report, whose primary value is that it has forced those engaged in the work to give concrete expression to what they have been doing and thinking about up to this point. This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Progress Report on the Geology and Uranium Deposits of the Gas Hills Area, Fremont and Natrona Counties, Wyoming
From introduction: This report concerns the investigation of uranium deposits in the Gas Hills area in July 1954.
Progress Report on Waste Concentration Studies: Engineering Results on the BNL Semi-Works Vapor Filtration Vapor Compression Evaporator
Report issued by the Brookhaven National Laboratory discussing progress of waste concentration studies. As stated in the introduction, "the present report covers all experimental hot runs up to the time the still was turned over to the Waste Control Section for intermediate handling of laboratory D waste" (p. 1). This report includes tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Progress Report Pebble Bed Reactor Program: June 1, 1959-October 31, 1960
From abstract: This report describes analytical and development work in connection with the Pebble Bed Reactor concept. The principle involved in the reactor is the heating of graphite pebbles by the fission of contained uranium and transfer of the heat generated to helium which is circulated through the permeable bed.
Progress Reports - Metallurgical Division: 13. Electrometallurgical Investigations
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines on the progress made on projects in the Metallurgical Division. Descriptions of progress in the different projects and operations conducted are listed. This report includes tables, graphs, and illustrations.
Progress summary number I : mechanical properties of flush-riveted joints submitted by five airplane manufacturers
No Description Available.
Project AN0115A Annual Report, 1976: Migration of Plutonium and Americium in the Lithosphere
Annual report of Argonne National Laboratory project ANO115A. Abstract: Studies have been carried out on the migration of plutonium and americium in solutions flowing through porous and crushed rock and through fissures. The migration process can be described in terms of the surface absorption of these elements. In addition, chemical effects on the absorption have been observed. One of these effects is possibly due to the presence of a plutonium polymer that migrates at a more rapid rate than normal plutonium.
Project AN0115A Annual Report, 1977: Migration of Long-Lived Radioactive Processing Wastes in Selected Rocks
Annual report of Argonne National Laboratory project ANO115A. This report discusses research to compare migration of radionuclides in scale models versus the Pu-Am disposal areas at Los Alamos Laboratory.
Project DRIBBLE, Petrographic Examination and Physical Tests of Cores, Tatum Salt Dome, Mississippi
Report providing information about experiments performed on core samples taken from the Tatum Salt Dome in Mississippi with an appendix about similar core samples from Louisiana. "All samples were examined petrographically before being subjected to physical tests to develop information on texture, fabric, structure, and composition" (p. vii).
Project Dugout: Apparent Crater Studies
From abstract: This report analyzes the dimensions and geometry of the Dugout crater, produced by the detonation of a row of five 18,144 kg nitromethane charges in basalt, were analyzed.
Project Dugout: Technical Director's Summary Report
From abstract: Project Dugout was a chemical explosive row charge cratering experiment in hard rock conducted at the AEC Nevada Test Site as part of the Plowshare Program for development of nuclear excavation technology.
Project FIST: Fault Isolation by Semi-automatic Techniques
From Abstract: "This report describes the hardware required and discusses practical ways in which the necessary circuitry can be built into prime equipment."
Project OTTER (Overland Train Terrain Evaluation Research), Report 2: Test Report
Report describing the results of a program to test and evaluate the cross-country mobility of the Overland Train (a logistical cargo carrier) in a desert environment. This study used a system for terrain classification developed by the U.S Engineer Waterways Experiment Station as part of the tests made on various courses at the U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground in Arizona.
Project Plan for the Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Boiling Water Reactor
In 1956, the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) Facility was first operated at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) as a test reactor to demonstrate the feasibility of operating an integrated power plant using a direct cycle boiling water reactor as a heat source. In 1967, ANL permanently shut down the EBWR and placed it in dry lay-up. This project plan presents the schedule and organization for the decontamination and decommissioning of the EBWR Facility which will allow it to be reused by other ANL scientific research programs. The project total estimated cost is $14.3M and is projected to generate 22,000 cubic feet of low-level radioactive waste which will be disposed of at an approved DOE burial ground. 18 figs., 3 tabs.
Project SAND Final Program Report: Volume 1
This report presents a summary of all the SAND (Sampling of Aerospace Nuclear Debris) ballistic vehicle firings, and an analysis of the first SAND sampler flight test.
Project Scooter: Final Report, October 1963
From abstract: This report includes results of studies of crater dimension, throwout material distribution, ground motion, dust cloud growth, and long-range air blast.
Project Sulky: Preshot Geologic Investigations
From abstract: A comprehensive geologic and engineering investigation was undertaken at the site on Buckboard Mesa selected for the SULKY event, a nuclear cratering experiment, conducted in dry basalt.
A proof of the theorem regarding the distribution of lift over the span for minimum induced drag
The proof of the theorem that the elliptical distribution of lift over the span is that which will give rise to the minimum induced drag has been given in a variety of ways, generally speaking too difficult to be readily followed by the graduate of the average good technical school of the present day. In the form of proof this report makes an effort to bring the matter more readily within the grasp of this class of readers.
Propagation of a free flame in a turbulent gas stream
No Description Available.
Propagation of a free flame in a turbulent gas stream
Effective flame speeds of free turbulent flames were measured by photographic, ionization-gap, and photomultiplier-tube methods, and were found to have a statistical distribution attributed to the nature of the turbulent field. The effective turbulent flame speeds for the free flame were less than those previously measured for flames stabilized on nozzle burners, Bunsen burners, and bluff bodies. The statistical spread of the effective turbulent flame speeds was markedly wider in the lean and rich fuel-air-ratio regions, which might be attributed to the greater sensitivity of laminar flame speed to flame temperature in those regions. Values calculated from the turbulent free-flame-speed analysis proposed by Tucker apparently form upper limits for the statistical spread of free-flame-speed data. Hot-wire anemometer measurements of the longitudinal velocity fluctuation intensity and longitudinal correlation coefficient were made and were employed in the comparison of data and in the theoretical calculation of turbulent flame speed.
Propagation of Density Disturbances in Air-Water Flow
From Introduction: "In this work, a forced-circulation air-water loop was employed for investigating the behavior of void perturbations. Upon attaining steady-state conditions, disturbances in the void fraction were superimposed at very low frequencies (~0.4 cps). A better understanding of hydrodynamic transient behavior will generate more confidence in the design of boiling-water reactor systems."
Propagation of sound into a wind-created shadow zone
No Description Available.
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket engine design : calculations of chamber length to vaporize a single n-heptane drop
No Description Available.
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket-engine design : calculations of chamber length to vaporize various propellants
No Description Available.
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket-engine design : calculations using various log-probability distributions of heptane drops
No Description Available.
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket-engine design : experimental effect of fuel temperature on liquid-oxygen - heptane performance
Characteristic exhaust velocity of a 200-pound-thrust rocket engine was evaluated for fuel temperatures of -90 degrees, and 200 degrees f with a spray formed by two impinging heptane jets reacting in a highly atomized oxygen atmosphere. Tests covered a range of mixture ratios and chamber lengths. The characteristic exhaust-velocity efficiency increased 2 percent for a 290 degree f increase in fuel temperature. This increase in performance can be compared with that obtained by increasing chamber length by about 1/2 inch. The result agrees with the fuel-temperature effect predicted from an analysis based on droplet evaporation theory. Mixture ratio markedly affected characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, but total flow rate and fuel temperature did not.
Propellant vaporization as a criterion for rocket engine design : relation between percentage of propellant vaporized and engine performance
No Description Available.
Propeller analysis from experimental data
The operation of the propeller is analyzed by the use of the distribution of forces along the radius, combined with theoretical equations. The data were obtained in the NACA 20-foot wind tunnel on a 4-foot-diameter, two-blade propeller, operating in front of four body shapes, ranging from a small shaft to support the propeller to conventional NACA cowling. A method of estimating the axial and the rotational energy in the wake as a fractional part of the propeller power is given. A knowledge of the total thrust and torque is necessary for the estimation.
The propeller and cooling-air-flow characteristics of a twin-engine airplane model equipped with NACA D(sub S)-type cowlings and with propellers of NACA 16-series airfoil sections
No Description Available.
Propeller blade stresses caused by periodic displacement of the propeller shaft
The present report deals with different vibration stresses of the propeller and their removal by an elastic coupling of propeller and engine. A method is described for protecting the propeller from unstable oscillations and herewith from the thus excited alternating gyroscopic moments. The respective vibration equations are set down and the amount of elasticity required is deduced.
Propeller charts for the determination of the rotational speed for the maximum ratio of the propulsive efficiency to the specific fuel consumption
A set of propeller operating efficiency charts, based on a coefficient from which the propeller rotational speed has been eliminated, is presented. These charts were prepared with data obtained from tests of full-size metal propellers in the NACA propeller-research tunnel. Working charts for nine propeller-body combinations are presented, including results from tests of dual-rotating propellers. These charts are to be used in the calculation of the range and the endurance of airplanes equipped with constant-speed propellers in which, for given flight conditions, it is desired to determine the propeller revolution speed that gives the maximum ratio of the propulsive efficiency to the specific fuel consumption. The coefficient on which the charts are based may be written in the form of a thrust coefficient or a thrust-power coefficient. A method of using the charts is outlined and sample computations for a typical airplane are included.
Propeller design - a simple system based on model propeller test data III
This report, the third of a series of four, describes a simple system for designing propellers of a standard form. In this report, the system is based on tests of a family of model propellers of standard Navy form, the data from which have been extended by means of calculations to cover the complete range likely to be found in practice. However, it can be worked out for any family having propellers of one general form.
Propeller design: extension of test data on a family of model propellers by means of the modified blade element theory II
This report is the second of a series of four on propeller design, and describes the method used to extend the data obtained from tests on a family of thirteen model propellers to include all propellers of the same form likely to be met in practice. This necessitates the development of a method of propeller analysis which when used to calculate the powers and efficiencies gives results which check the tests throughout their range.
Propeller design I : practical application of the blade element theory
This report is the first of a series of four on propeller design and contains a description of the blade elements or modified Drzewiecke theory as used in the Bureau of Aeronautics, U.S. Navy Department. Blade interference corrections are used which were taken from R.& M. NO. 639 of the British Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. The airfoil characteristics used were obtained from tests of model propellers, not from tests of model wings.
Propeller design IV : a simple method for determining the strength of propellers
The object of this report, the last of a series of four on propeller design, is to describe a simple method for determining whether the strength of a propeller of a standard form is sufficient for safe operation. An approximate method of stress analysis is also given.