UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 65,517 Matching Results

Search Results

24 m meteorological tower data report period: January through December, 1996
This report was prepared by the Desert Research Institute (DRI) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). It summarizes meteorological data collected at the 24 meter tower at the Nevada Test Site Hazardous Material Spill Center (HAZMAT) located at Frenchman Flat near Mercury, Nevada, approximately 75 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The tower was originally installed in July, 1993 to characterize baseline conditions for an EPA sponsored experimental research program at the HAZMAT. This report presents results of the monitoring for January--December, 1996, providing: a status of the measurement systems during the report period and a summary of the meteorological conditions at the HAZMAT during the report period. The scope of the report is limited to summary data analyses and does not include extensive meteorological analysis. The tower was instrumented at 8 levels. Wind speed, wind direction, and temperature were measured at all 8 levels. Relative humidity was measured at 3 levels. Solar and net radiation were measured at 2 meters above the ground. Barometric pressure was measured at the base of the tower and soil temperature was measured near the base of the tower.
25--30 T water cooled pulse magnet concept for neutron scattering experiment
The Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory is in need of a high field, split-pair, pulse magnet that would provide a 25--30 T field in a 25 mm bore and 10 mm split gap for 2--4 ms at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Single stack Bitter magnets of this type providing less than 20 T vertical field in the split gap have been constructed before. To produce higher fields, there is a need to use a multiple layer coil with internal reinforcement. The magnet should withstand up to 10{sup 7} cycles of loading and unloading. The authors have conducted a feasibility study that address these unique requirements.
25. anniversary of the 1973 oil embargo: Energy trends since the first major U.S. energy crisis
The purpose of this publication is not to assess the causes of the 1973 energy crisis or the measures that were adopted to resolve it. The intent is to present some data on which such analyses can be based. Many of the trends presented here fall into two distinct periods. From 1973 to the mid-1980`s, prices continued at very high levels, in part because of a second oil shock in 1979--80. During this period, rapid progress was made in raising American oil production, reducing dependence on oil imports, and improving end-use efficiency. After the oil price collapse of the mid-1980`s, however, prices retreated to more moderate levels, the pace of efficiency gains slowed, American oil production fell, and the share of imports rose. 30 figs.
26.7 MHz cavity mechanical tuner requirements
.
A 30-T pulsed magnet suitable for neutron scattering experiments
We describe a conceptual design for a 30-T vertical-field split-pair magnet suitable for neutron scattering studies. While the magnet is primarily intended for diffraction and spectroscopic studies using a pulsed neutron source, it might also have application for relaxational studies,at steady-state sources. The magnet will have a 5-cm bore for sample environment equipment, a 1-cm gap for the neutrons to illuminate the sample and through which to observe the scattering. It will run with a repetition frequency of 2 Hz, and a pulse length of 3 ms. We discuss scientific and engineering considerations that led to this specification and describe the designs of both magnet and power supply.
A 40 GByte/s read-out system for GEM
The preliminary design of the read-out system for the GEM (Gammas, Electrons, Muons) detector at the Superconducting Super Collider is presented. The system reads all digitized data from the detector data sources at a Level 1 trigger rate of up to 100 kHz. A total read-out bandwidth of 40 GBytes/s is available. Data are stored in buffers that are accessible for further event filtering by an on-line, processor farm. Data are transported to the farm only as they are needed by the higher-level trigger algorithms, leading to a reduced bandwidth requirement in the Data Acquisition System.
45-day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-C-202, auger samples 95-Aug-026 and 95-Aug-027
Two auger samples from tank 241-C-202 (C-202) were received at the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. Two samples were submitted for energetics determination by DSC. Within the triplicate analyses of each sample, one of the results for energetics exceeded the notification limit. The sample and duplicate analyses for both augers exceeded the notification limit for TGA. As required by the Tank Characterization Plan, the appropriate notifications were made within 24 hours of official confirmation that the limits were violated.
45-day safety screen results and final report for Tank 241-C-203, Auger samples 95 AUG-020 and 95-AUG-021
This document serves as the 45-day report deliverable for the tank C-203 auger samples collected on April 5, 1995 (samples 95-AUG-20 and 95-AUG-021). As no secondary analyses were required and no other analyses have been requested, this document also serves as the final report for C-203 auger sampling. Each sample was received, extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratories in accordance with the Tank Characterization Plan (TCP) referenced below. Included in this report are the primary safety screening results (DSC, TGA, and alpha) and density results. The worklists and raw data are included in this report. Photographs of the auger samples were taken during extrusion and, although not included in this report, are available.
45-Day safety screen results and final report for Tank 241-SX-113, Auger samples 94-AUG-028 and 95-AUG-029
This document serves as the 45-day report deliverable for tank 241-SX-113 auger samples collected on May 9 and 10, 1995. The samples were extruded, and analyzed by the 222-S Laboratory. Laboratory procedures completed include: differential scanning calorimetry; thermogravimetric analysis; and total alpha analysis. This report incudes the primary safety screening results obtained from the analyses. As the final report, the following are also included: chains of custody; the extrusion logbook; sample preparation data; and total alpha analysis raw data.
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-B-112, auger samples 95-AUG-014 and 95-AUG-015
Two auger samples from Tank 241-B-112 (B-112) were received in the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analyses, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. All results for all analyses (DSC, TGA, and total alpha) were within the safety screening notification limits specified in the Tank Characterization Plan (TCP). No notification nor secondary analyses were required. Tank B-112 is not part of any of the four Watch Lists.
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-BY-103, auger samples 95-AUG-012 and 95-AUG-013
Two auger samples from tank 241-BY-103 (BY-103) were received by the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. Analytical results for the TGA analyses for both samples were less than the safety screening notification limit. Since notification is made if the sample is analyzed at less than 17% water, notification was made on April 20, 1995. Although the sample results were below this limit, no secondary analyses were required or performed. Included in this report are the primary safety screening results obtained from the analyses and copies of all DSC and TGA raw data scans as requested per the TCP. Photographs of the auger samples were taken during extrusion and, although not included in this report, are available. Tank BY-103 is on the ferrocyanide Watch List.
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-C-101, auger sample 95-AUG-019
One auger sample from Tank 241-C-101 was received by the 222-S Laboratory and underwent safety screening analyses--differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha analysis--in accordance with the tank characterization plan. Analytical results for the TGA on the crust sample (the uppermost portion of the auger sample) (sample number S95T000823) were less than the safety screening notification limit of 17 weight percent water. Verbal and written notifications were made on May 3, 1995. No exotherms were observed in the DSC analyses and the total alpha results were well below the safety screening notification limit. This report includes the primary safety screening results obtained from the analyses and copies of all DSC and TGA raw data scans as requested per the TCP. Although not included in this report, a photograph of the extruded sample was taken and is available. This report also includes bulk density measurements required by Characterization Plant Engineering. Additional analyses (pH, total organic carbon, and total inorganic carbon) are being performed on the drainable liquid at the request of Characterization Process Control; these analyses will be reported at a later date in a final report for this auger sample. Tank C-101 is not part of any of the four Watch Lists.
45-Day safety screen results for tank 241-C-105, push mode, cores 72 and 76
This document is a report of the analytical results for samples collected between March 14 and March 22, 1995 from the radioactive wastes in Tank 241-C-105 at the Hanford Reservation. Core samples were collected from the solid wastes in the tank and underwent safety screening analyses including differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and total alpha analysis.
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-C-201, Auger samples 95-AUG-025 and 95-AUG-026
Two auger samples from tank 241-C-201 (C-201) were received by the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. Analytical results for the DSC analyses of both samples exceeded the notification limit of 481 J/g (dry weight basis). As well, the TGA analyses for both samples were less than the safety screening notification limit (notification is made if the sample is analyzed at less than 17 percent water). Notification of both of these occurrences was made on May,15, 1995, and secondary analysis of total organic carbon (TOC) was initiated. These TOC analysis results are also included in this report.
45-day safety screen results for tank 241-C-204, auger samples 95-Aug-022 and 95-Aug-023
Two auger samples from tank 241-C-204 (C-204) were received at the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. The three samples submitted to energetics determination by DSC exceeded the notification limit. As required by the Tank Characterization Plan, the appropriate notifications were made within 24 hours of official confirmation that the limit was exceeded. Secondary analyses have been initiated. Results from secondary analyses will be included in a revision to this report.
45-Day safety screen results for Tank 241-U-201, push mode, cores 70, 73 and 74
Three core samples, each having two segments, from Tank 241-U-201 (U-201) were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Safety screening analysis, such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity were conducted on Core 70, Segment 1 and 2 and on Core 73, Segment 1 and 2. Core 74, Segment 1 and 2 were taken to test rotary bit in push mode sampling. No analysis was requested on Core 74, Segment 1 and 2. Analytical results for the TGA analyses for Core 70, Segment 1, Upper half solid sample was less than the safety screening notification limit of 17 percent water. Notification was made on April 27, 1995. No exotherm was associated with this sample. Analytical results are presented in Tables 1 to 4, with the applicable notification limits shaded.
45-Day safety screen results for tank 241-U-202, push mode, cores 75 and 78
This document is a report of the analytical results for samples collected from the radioactive wastes in Tank 241-U-202 at the Hanford Reservation. Core samples were collected from the solid wastes in the tank and underwent safety screening analyses including differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, and total alpha analysis. Results indicate that no safety screening notification limits were exceeded.
45-Day safety screen results for tank 241-U-203, push mode, cores 79 and 80
Two one-segment core samples from tank 241-U-203 (U-203) were received by the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. In addition to the safety screening requirements, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) spectrographic analysis for lithium was performed to determine the extent of hydrostatic head fluid contamination during the sampling event. No notification limits were exceeded for these analyses.
45-day safety screen results for tank 241-U-204, push mode, cores 81 and 82
This is the 45-Day report for the fiscal year 1995 tank 241-U-204 (U-204) push-mode characterization effort. Included are a summary of analytical results and copies of the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) scans. Core samples 81 and 82 from tank U-204, obtained by the push-mode core sampling method, were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Each core consisted of only one segment. Both core samples and the field blank were extruded, subsampled, and analyzed in accordance with Reference 1. Drainable liquids and the field blank were analyzed at the segment level for energetics by DSC, percent water by TGA, and total organic carbon (TOC) by furnace oxidation. In addition, the presence or absence of any separable, presumably organic, layer in drainable liquid samples was noted and none was observed. The solids were analyzed directly at the half segment level for energetics by DSC, percent water by TGA, and TOC by persulfate oxidation. Total alpha activity was determined on fusion digestions of the sludge subsamples. No immediate notifications were necessary on samples from cores 81 or 82.
45-Day safety screening report for grab samples from Tank 241-AP-107
Three samples; 107-AP-1C, 107-AP-2c and 107-AP-3C; were received at 222-S Laboratory for analysis of DSC, TGA and visual appearance. Four additional samples; 107-AP-1D, 107-AP-2D, 107-AP-3D and 107-AP-6; were received for visual appearance only. No results exceeded the safety screen notification criteria. This report compiles the analytical results. Tank 241-AP-107 is a double-shell tank which is not on any of the four Watch Lists.
45-day safety screening results and final report for Tank 241-BX-106, auger samples 95-AUG-049 and 95-AUG-050
Two Auger Samples from tank 241-BX-106 were received at the 222-S Laboratory and underwent safety screening analyses - differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), total alpha analysis, and bulk density measurements - in accordance with the sampling and analysis plan.
45-day safety screening results and final report for Tank 241-BX-110, auger samples 95-AUG-045 and 95-AUG-046
This document summarizes the final results for the safety screening of tank 241-BX-110.
45-Day safety screening results for tank 241-U-102, push mode cores 143 and 144
This document is the 45-day report deliverable for tank 241-U-102 push mode core segments collected between April 16, 1996 and May 6, 1996 and received by the 222-S Laboratory between April 17, 1996 and May 8, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance, with the Tank 241-U-102 Push Mode Core Sampling and analysis Plan (TSAP) (Hu, 1996) and the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) (Dukelow, et al., 1995). The analytical results are included in Table 1. Attachment I is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analysis are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. The diagram identifying the hydrostatic head fluid (HHF) blank is also included, Primary safety screening results and the raw data from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) analyses are included in this report. Two of the samples submitted for DSC analysis exceeded notification limits as stated in the Safety Screening DQO (Dukelow, et al., 1995). Cyanide analysis was requested on these samples and a Reactive System Screening Tool analysis was requested for the sample exhibiting the highest exothenn in accordance with the TSAP (Hu, 1996). The results for these analyses will be reported in a revision to this document.
45-day safety screening results for Tank 241-U-107, Push Mode Cores 129, 134 and 135
This document summarizes the results of the push mode core samples for tank 241-U-107.
50 Watt Recooler ASME Boiler Code Calculations
.
59. Cold Spring Harbor symposium on quantitative biology: Molecular genetics of cancer
Investigation of the mechanistic aspects of cancer has its roots in the studies on tumor viruses and their effects on cell proliferation, function, and growth. This outstanding progress was well documented in previous Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology. In the early to mid 1980s, progress on the development of chromosome mapping strategies and the accumulation of DNA probes that identified polymorphisms, encouraged by the international Human Genome Project, enabled the identification of other genes that contributed to familial inheritance of high susceptibility to specific cancers. This approach was very successful and led to a degree of optimism that one aspect of cancer, the multistep genetic process from early neoplasia to metastatic tumors, was beginning to be understood. It therefore seemed appropriate that the 59th Symposium on Quantitative Biology focus attention on the Molecular Genetics of Cancer. The concept was to combine the exciting progress on the identification of new genetic alterations in human tumor cells with studies on the function of the cancer gene products and how they go awry in tumor cells.
60-day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-C-111, auger samples 95-Aug-002, 95-Aug-003, 95-Aug-016, and 95-Aug-017
This report presents the details of the auger sampling events for underground waste tank C-111. The samples were shipped to the 222-S laboratories were they underwent safety screening analysis and primary ferricyanide analysis. The samples were analyzed for alpha total, total organic carbon, cyanide, Ni, moisture, and temperature differentials. The results of this analysis are presented in this document.
60-day safety screen results for tank 241-BY-106, rotary mode, cores 64 and 65
Core samples 64 and 65 from tank BY-106, obtained by rotary-mode core sampling, were received by the 222-S Laboratories. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis were carried out.
60-day waste compatibility safety issue and final results for 244-TX DCRT, grab samples TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3
Three grab samples (TX-95-1, TX-95-2, and TX-95-3) were taken from tank 241- TX-244 riser 8 on November 7, 1995 and received by the 222-S Laboratory on that same day. Samples TX-95-1 and TX-95-2 were designated as supernate liquids, and sample TX-95-3 was designated as a supernate/sludge. These samples were analyzed to support the waste compatibility safety program. Accuracy and precision criteria were met for all analyses. No notifications were required based on sample results. This document provides the analysis to support the waste compatibility safety program.
60-Day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for AY-102 grab samples
Four grab samples (2AY-96-15, 2AY-96-16, 2AY-96-17, and 2AY-96-18) were taken from Riser 15D of Tank 241-AY-102 on October 8, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 8, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support of the Waste Compatibility Program. No notifications were required based on sample results.
60-day waste compatibility safety issues and final results for TX-244 grab samples
Three grab samples (244-TX-96-1, 244-TX-96-2, and 244-TX-96-3) were taken from Riser 8 of Tank 241-TX-244 on October 18, 1996, and received by 222-S Laboratory on October 18, 1996. These samples were analyzed in accordance with Compatibility Grab Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP) and Data Quality Objectives for Tank Farms Waste Compatibility Program (DQO) in support ofthe Waste Compatibility Program. Notifications were made in accordance with TSAP for pH and OH- analyses. Upon further review, the pH notification was deemed unnecessary, as the notification limit did not apply to this tank.
60 HZ beam motion reduction at NSLS UV storage ring
A significant reduction in 60 hz beam motion has been achieved in the UV storage ring. From the wide band harmonic beam motion signal, 60 hz signal is extracted by tuned bandpass filter. This signal is processed by the phase and amplitude adjustment circuits and then, it is fed into the harmonic orbit generation circuits. Several harmonics, near the tune, were canceled by employing one circuit for each harmonic. The design and description of this experiment is given in this paper. The results showing reduction in beam motion at 60 hz are also provided.
60 kilograms high explosive containment with multi-diagnostic capability
In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60 kilogram (kg) firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high explosives, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste.
90-Day safety screen results and final report for tank 241-B-104 push-mode, cores 88 and 89. Revision 1
This document reports the final screen results for tank 241-B-104 Push Mode, Cores 88 and 89
94-1 Research and Development Project lead laboratory support: Fiscal year 1997. Progress report
On May 26, 1994, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) issued Recommendation 94-1, which expressed the board`s concern about nuclear materials left in the manufacturing pipeline after the US halted its nuclear weapons production activities. The DNFSB emphasized the need for remediation of these materials. As part of Recommendation 94-1, the DNFSB defined research objectives as follows: that a research program be established to fill any gaps in the information base needed for choosing among the alternate processes to be used in safe conversion of various types of fissile materials to optimal forms for safe interim storage and the longer-term disposition. To achieve this objective a research and technology development program with two elements is needed: a technology-specific program that is focused on treating and storing materials safety, with concomitant development of storage criteria and surveillance requirements, centered around 3- and 8-year targets; and a core technology program to augment the knowledge base about general chemical and physical processing and storage behavior and to assure safe interim material storage until disposition policies are formulated. The paper reports the progress on the following: materials identification and surveillance; stabilization process development; surveillance and monitoring; core technologies; and project management.
94-1 Research and Development Project Lead Laboratory Support. Status report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996
This document reports status and technical progress for Los Alamos 94-1 Research and Development projects concerned with the management of plutonium and plutonium contaminated materials during the third quarter of FY96.
94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, January 1--March 31, 1996
This document reports status and technical progress for Los Alamos National Laboratories 94-1 Research and Development projects. An introduction to the project structure and an executive summary are included. Projects described include Electrolytic Decontamination, Combustibles, Detox, Sand, Slag, and Crucible, Surveillance, and Core Technology.
94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, January 1--March 31, 1997
This status report is published for Los Alamos National Laboratory 94-1 Research and Development Project Support. The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management funds these projects in order to support the storage or disposal of legacy plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials that resulted from weapons production throughout the DOE complex. This report summarizes status and technical progress for Los Alamos 94-1 projects during the second quarter of fiscal year 1997.
94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, July 1, 1996--September 30, 1996
This document reports status and technical progress for Los Alamos 94-1 Research and Development projects. Updated schedule charts are shown in the appendix. This is the fourth status report published for Los Alamos National Laboratory 94-1 Research and Development Project Support. The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) funds these projects in order to support the storage or disposal of legacy plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials resulting from weapons production throughout the DOE complex. This document also serves as an end-for-year review of projects and positions the program for FY97.
94-1 Research and Development Project Lead laboratory support. Status report, October 1--December 31, 1995
This is a quarterly progress report of the 94-1 Research and Development Lead Laboratory Support Technical Program Plan for the first quarter of FY 1996. The report provides details concerning descriptions, DOE-complex-wide material stabilization technology needs, scientific background and approach, progress, benefits to the DOE complex, and collaborations for selected subprojects. An executive summary and report on end-of-quarter spending is included.
94-1 research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, October 1--December 31, 1996
This status report is published for Los Alamos National Laboratory 94-1 Research and Development (R and D) projects. The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE/EM) funds these projects in order to support the storage or disposal of legacy plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials that resulted from weapons production throughout the DOE complex. This report summarizes status and technical progress for Materials Identification and Surveillance; Stabilization Process Development; Surveillance and Monitoring; Core Technology; Separations; Materials Science; Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Plutonium(IV) and Plutonium(VI) Phosphates; Plutonium Phosphate Solution Chemistry; and Molten Salt/Nonaqueous Electrochemistry.
94-A13 Native American Initiative Short Course Management Plan
A training program conducted in Bartlesville by BDM-Oklahoma technical staff, which included geologists, geophysicists, exploration and drilling specialists, and environmental policy experts. The proposed training schedule offered four courses per year and included those coursed identified by the tribes in the survey. The training program was outlined for members of Native American Tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The proposed program contributed to meeting the goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Domestic Oil and Gas Initiative to help Native American tribes become more self-sufficient in developing and managing their resources through training in cost-effective, improved technologies for hydrocarbon production that will meet environmental regulations. The training program outlined was for adult tribal representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings or setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry. The course content is in response to a survey that was developed by BDM-Oklahoma and sent in the Spring of 1995 to 26 tribal agencies identified through previous contact with DOE. Tribes were asked to indicate course content needs, levels, preferred time of year, and location. Six tribes responded with specific recommendations and needs. These tribes, were the Creek, Pueblo, Cherokee, St. Regis Mohawk, Northern Arapho, and Ute Mountain Ute.
97-ERD-022 final report: Supernova on Nova
This is the final year of the 3-year LDRD-ERD involving Lasers, D&NT, Physics, and ILSA to develope astrophysics experiments on intense lasers such as the Nova and Gekko lasers. During this 3 year period, we have developed a highly successful experiment probing the hydrodynamics of the explosion phase of core-collapse supernovae, which occurs during the first ~3 hours after core collapse. This was in collaboration with the Univ. of Arizona and CEA/Saclay. We also developed a very successful experiment to probe the hydrodynamics of the later time, young remnant phase, meaning the first ~10-20 years after core collapse. This was in collaboration with the Univ. of Michigan and Univ. of Colorado. Finally, we developed during the final year an exquisite experiment to probe the dynamics of radiative, high Mach number astrophysical jets, in collaboration with the Univ. of Maryland and Osaka Univ. Each experiment has received very high visibility, with a multitude of publications, both in the technical journals (most importantly, the astrophysical journals) and in the popular press. The attached publication list shows 25 papers published or submitted to technical journals, 5 articles appearing in the popular press (including a cover story of Sky and Telescope), and 65 conference presentations, ~10 of which were invited talks. The most important papers to come out of this effort was a comprehensive theory paper for Ap. J. establishing the rigorous scaling between laboratory laser experiments and the astrophysical subjects of interest: supernovae, supernova remnants, and jets; and a review article for Science covering this emerging subfield of Astrophysics on Intense Lasers. Since there are so many publications that have resulted from this LDRD project, only these two most important papers are attached. The rest are properly referenced, and can be found online or in the library. In anticipation of the closing of ...
100-D Area In Situ Redox Treatability Test for Chromate-Contaminated Groundwater: FY 1998 Year-End Report
A treatability test was conducted for the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) technology at the US Department of Energy's Hanford, Washington 100D Area. The target contaminant was dissolved chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater. The ISRM technology involves creating a permeable subsurface treatment zone to reduce mobile chromate in groundwater to an insoluble form. The ISRM permeable treatment zone is created by reducing ferric iron [Fe(III)] to ferrous iron [Fe(II)] within the aquifer sediments. This is accomplished by injecting aqueous sodium dithionite into the aquifer and withdrawing the reaction products. The goal of the treatability test was to create a linear ISRM barrier by injecting sodium dithionite into five wells. Well installation and site characterization activities began in the spring of 1997. The first dithionite injection took place in September 1997. The results of this first injection were monitored through the spring of 1998; the remaining four dithionite injections were carried out in May through July of 1998. These five injections created a reduced zone in the Hanford unconfined aquifer 150 feet in length (perpendicular to groundwater flow) by 50 feet wide. The reduced zone extended over the thickness of the unconfined zone, which is approximately 15 feet. Analysis of recent groundwater sampling events shows that the concentrations of chromate [Cr(VI)] in groundwater in the reduced zone have been decreased from starting concentrations of approximately 900 ppb to below analytical detection limits (<7 ppb). Chromate concentrations are also declining in some downgradient monitoring wells. Laboratory analysis of iron in the soil indicates that the barrier should remain in place for approximately 20 to 25 years. These measurements will be confirmed by analysis of sediment cores in FY 1999.
100-D Ponds closure plan. Revision 1
The 100-D Ponds is a Treatment, Storage, and Disposal (TSD) unit on the Hanford Facility that received both dangerous and nonregulated waste. This Closure Plan (Rev. 1) for the 100-D Ponds TSD unit consists of a RCRA Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application (Rev. 3), a RCRA Closure Plan, and supporting information contained in the appendices to the plan. The closure plan consists of eight chapters containing facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring data. There are also chapters containing the closure strategy and performance standards. The strategy for the closure of the 100-D Ponds TSD unit is clean closure. Appendices A and B of the closure plan demonstrate that soil and groundwater beneath 100-D Ponds are below cleanup limits. All dangerous wastes or dangerous waste constituents or residues associated with the operation of the ponds have been removed, therefore, human health and the environment are protected. Discharges to the 100-D Ponds, which are located in the 100-DR-1 operable unit, were discontinued in June 1994. Contaminated sediment was removed from the ponds in August 1996. Subsequent sampling and analysis demonstrated that there is no contamination remaining in the ponds, therefore, this closure plan is a demonstration of clean closure.
100 Femtosecond laser absorption in solid density targets
Experimental short pulse lasers are rapidly approaching energy levels where target irradiances exceeding 10{sup 20} W/CM{sup 2} are routinely achievable. These high intensity levels will open up a new class of solid target interaction physics where relativistic effects must be included and non-traditional absorption mechanisms become significant. However much remains to be understood of the absorption physics at lower intensities where classical absorption is dominated by collisional and resonance absorption. If attention is paid to producing clean laser pulses that do not significantly pre-pulse interact with the target, it is possible to produce plasmas of sufficiently short scale length that near-solid density interactions are observable at intensities exceeding 10{sup 18} W/CM{sup 2} for 100 fs laser irradiation. We report here extensions to our previous efforts at normal incidence that expand our observations to non-normal angles including the effect of polarization for several target materials. Between 10{sup 13} W/CM{sup 2} and 10{sup 14} W/CM{sup 2} we observe that the target absorption retains a signature of the intra-band atomic transitions. At higher intensities a more material independent ion-electron collisional absorption and short scale length resonance absorption dominate. P - polarized absorption in short scale length plasmas has been observed to exceed 60 percent.
100-FR-3 groundwater/soil gas supplemental limited field investigation report
In 1993, a Limited Field Investigation (LFI) was conducted for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit which identified trichloroethylene (TCE) as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) (DOE-RL 1994). In groundwater samples collected for the LFI, TCE was detected in well 199-177-1 at a concentration exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant level (5 {mu}g/L) and Washington State groundwater criteria (3 {mu}g/L). With the concurrence of the EPA and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), a supplemental LFI was conducted to determine the extent and potential source of TCE groundwater contamination associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. This report summarizes the activities and results of the groundwater/soil gas supplemental LFI for the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The primary objective of this investigation was to assess the lateral distribution of TCE in shallow (3 to 5 ft below the water table) groundwater associated with the 100-FR-3 Operable Unit. The second objective was to assess soil gas (3 to 5 concentrations in the study area in an attempt to identify potential sources of TCE and develop a correlation between soil gas and groundwater concentrations). Finally, the third objective of the investigation was to refine the site conceptual model.
100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor
Combustion of wood chips in a packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system is described. A discussion on flue gas emissions and mass balances is included.
A 100-kV, 2-kA, 2.5-{micro}S Pulser for Developing and Calibrating Long-Pulse Diagnostics
The development of voltage and current probes for measuring an electron beam's current and position associated with several microsecond-long pulses from advanced Linear Induction Accelerators requires a precision pulser that can deliver both high voltages and high currents to a diagnostics Test Line. Seven-stage, type-E PFNs have been utilized in both a transformer and 4-stage Marx (plus/minus) configuration. The resulting 50-ohm pulser delivers to the Test Line a repeatable 100 kV, ca. 2 {micro}s flat-top ({+-} 1%), 2.5 {micro}s FWHM pulse with a rise time of 175 ns and 500 ns for the transformer and Marx options, respectively. Methods of reducing the rise time for both options are discussed and modeled. The coaxial Test Line is insulated at up to two atmospheres with SF{sub 6} and includes two transition regions to hold and test different diameter beam current and position monitors (BPMs). The center conductor incorporates both translation and tip/tilt with an accuracy of 100 {micro}m. Finally, the line is terminated in a matched radial resistor that provides a planar region at fields up to 40 kV/cm for the testing of voltage probes. Both the transformer and Marx options are modeled and compared to experimental results.
A 100 MVA generator utilizing high temperature superconducting windings -- design assessment & component development. Final report
The operation of a high temperature superconducting generator rotor using closed-cycle refrigeration to indirectly cool the field windings was considered to be the best choice for an HTS application. The SPI program proposed to achieve the following goals: In Task 1 a 100 MVA generator with a HTS rotor field winding would be designed. An energy and economic benefits analysis was to be a key part of the program. In addition, the generator/grid interactions were to be modeled. Concurrently, Task 2 was to include further development of Bi-2223 silver-clad tape as well as an alternate Tl-1223 conductor, manufacture of 3,000 meters of tape, and development and fabrication of a prototype field coil. Details of progress have been reported in the quarterly status reports and summarized in the final reports on the tasks. Therefore this report will give a review of the original goals of each task and summary of results for each.