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Cattle Scab and Methods of Control and Eradication

Description: Revised edition. "Cattle scab can be eradicated by dipping or spraying, but dipping is the better method of treatment. Lime-sulphur dips, nicotine dips, and crude-petroleum dips are efficacious. Methods of preparing and using these dips are described and the intervals between dippings and the conditions under which the various dips may safely be used for the different kinds of scab are discussed. Also, plans of cattle-dipping plants and directions for building vats and dipping cattle are given." -- p. 2
Date: 1932
Creator: Imes, Marion

Cattle Scab and Methods of Control and Eradication

Description: Revised edition. "Cattle scab can be eradicated by dipping or spraying, but dipping is the better method of treatment. Lime-sulphur dips, nicotine dips, and crude-petroleum dips are efficacious. Methods of preparing and using these dips are described and the intervals between dippings and the conditions under which the various dips may safely be used for the different kinds of scab are discussed. Also, plans of cattle-dipping plants and directions for building vats and dipping cattle are given." -- p. 2
Date: 1935
Creator: Imes, Marion

Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

The City Home Garden

Description: Revised edition. "Fresh vegetables for an average family may be grown upon a large back yard or city lot.... Thousands of acres of idle land that may be used for gardens are still available within the boundaries of our large cities. Some of the problems that confront the city gardener are more difficult than those connected with the farm garden, and it is the object of this bulletin to discuss these problems from a practical standpoint." -- p. 2. Soil preparation, tools, seeding, watering, diseases and pests, and space issues are all discussed and brief descriptions of several vegetables are given.
Date: 1938
Creator: Beattie, W. R. (William Renwick), b. 1870

The City Home Garden

Description: Revised edition. "Fresh vegetables for an average family may be grown upon a large back yard or city lot.... Thousands of acres of idle land that may be used for gardens are still available within the boundaries of our large cities. Some of the problems that confront the city gardener are more difficult than those connected with the farm garden, and it is the object of this bulletin to discuss these problems from a practical standpoint." -- p. 2. Soil preparation, tools, seeding, watering, diseases and pests, and space issues are all discussed and brief descriptions of several vegetables are given.
Date: 1930
Creator: Beattie, W. R. (William Renwick), b. 1870

Community cotton production.

Description: Recommends and describes the "one-variety community method" of cotton production, in which a community limits itself to growing a single variety of cotton in order to produce a uniform product.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cook, O. F. (Orator Fuller), 1867-1949. & Martin, R. D. (Robert Doane), 1896-

Conserving Corn From Weevils in the Gulf Coast States

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses the destructive impact of weevils on the corn crop in the southern United States and controls measures which farmers may find effective in reducing their losses to this pest. Among the insects discussed are the Angoumois grain moth and the rice or "black" weevil.
Date: 1931
Creator: Back, E. A. (Ernest Adna), 1886-

Control of Cherry Leaf-Spot

Description: Revised edition. "The leaf-spot of the cherry seriously injures both sweet and sour varieties of that fruit in many sections of the eastern half of the United States. It is caused by a fungus which lives through the winter on the fallen leaves and infects the new leaves in the spring. The best control of this disease is obtained by spraying with a diluted lime-sulphur solution or with Bordeaux mixture 1) as soon as the petals fall, 2) about three weeks later, and 3) directly after the fruit is picked." -- p. 2
Date: 1937
Creator: Roberts, John W. (John William), 1882- & Pierce, Leslie

Cover Crops for Soil Conservation

Description: "Cover crops are crops sown or planted in thick stands for the purpose of protecting and enriching the soil.... That the use of cover crops is a most efficient means for preventing soil erosion and increasing soil fertility is well known; yet this practice is not nearly so widely and extensively followed as it should be. The kinds of cover crops that should be used and the method of utilizing them to the best advantage varies in different regions, according to climatic conditions but almost everywhere cover cropping in some form can be profitably followed." -- p. 1. The bulletin considers cover crops as either legumes or non-legumes.
Date: 1936
Creator: Kell, Walter V., 1889- & McKee, Roland

Crops Against the Wind on the Southern Great Plains

Description: "This bulletin briefly traces the circumstances which have created the soil problems in the southern Great Plains and shows how the hand of man has hastened present troubles. But it goes further and deals with the methods now being used to solve the problem on nature's own terms." -- p. 2-3. Some of the solutions discussed include contour farming, terraces, water conservation techniques, crop lines, and revegetation.
Date: 1939
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-