UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 12 Matching Results

Search Results

Formulas, Tables and Curves for Computing the Mutual Inductance of Two Coaxial Circles

Description: Scientific paper issued by the Bureau of Standards over the mutual inductance of two coaxial circles. As stated in the abstract, "a number of examples are given to show the methods of computation by the different formulas, tables, and charts" (p. 541). This paper includes tables, and illustrations.
Date: August 5, 1924
Creator: Curtis, Harvey L. & Sparks, C. Matilda

Historical Notes on Aerodynamic Research

Description: "It is obviously interesting to know the names of those who were the first contributors to aeronautical science. Therefore, without claiming to give a complete history, I present in this article a summary list of names in chronological order relating to the history of experiments on the resistance of the air and its application to aeronautics" (p. 1).
Date: August 1924
Creator: Dollfus, Charles

Micarta Propellers 1: Materials

Description: Here, values for tension, compression edgewise of laminations, and transverse flatwise of laminations are given for Micarta made with various kinds of sheet material. The corresponding values for white oak are given for comparison. It was found by destructive and service tests that Micarta made with a good grade of cotton duck will give satisfactory service with most designs.
Date: August 1924
Creator: Caldwell, F. W. & Clay, N. S.

Micarta Propellers 2: Method of Construction

Description: The methods used in manufacturing Micarta propellers differ considerably from those employed with wood propellers on account of the hardness of the materials. The propellers must be formed accurately to size in a mold and afterwards balanced without the customary trimming of the material from the tips. Described here are the pressing and molding processes, filing, boring, balancing, and curing.
Date: August 1924
Creator: Caldwell, F. W. & Clay, N. S.

Micarta Propellers 3: General Description of the Design

Description: The design of propellers made of Micarta is discussed. The advantages of the material are noted, especially as compared with wood. The design changes necessitated by the use of Micarta are discussed with reference to the hub boss, the narrowing of the blade tips, the thinning of the blades, the angles of the leading and trailing edges, and the adjustment of the pitch. Results of flight tests show that the Micarta propeller gave a top speed of 2 miles per hour more than the wooden propeller while turning about 120 r.p.m slower, with about the same rate of climb.
Date: August 1924
Creator: Caldwell, F. W. & Clay, N. S.

Recent Researches in Airship Construction 1: Forces of Flow on a Moving Airship and the Effect of the Control Surfaces

Description: The problems as to how an airship can best be stabilized and steered and to what stresses it is subjected in the air, are so important as to determine in large measure the future development of airships much more than formerly when velocities of 30-35 meters (98-115 feet) per second were not known and the effects of the air flow were not so great.
Date: August 1924
Creator: Naatz, H.

Recent Researches in Airship Construction 2: Bending Stresses on an Airship in Flight

Description: The first part of this report shows the differences between commercial and war airships and then goes on to show how some of the problems were solved. Their thorough investigations of these problems finally enabled the Schutte-Lanz Company to construct bulkhead diagrams for determining the buoyancy of airships, by means of which the size of each cell was established. These diagrams were derived from bulkhead diagrams employed in ship designing and are used in a similar manner.
Date: August 1924
Creator: Naatz, H.

Structural and Economic Limits to the Dimensions of Airships

Description: "In opposition to the advantage of larger dimensions, there is one disadvantage, namely, the weight of the structure increases more rapidly than the buoyancy. It is not possible, however, to determine a general law. In order to formulate one having the merit of simplicity, we will divide the structure into two parts: one subject to tensile and compressive stresses, varying directly as the ascensional or lifting forces; the other subject to varying stresses of the surface areas" (p. 1).
Date: August 1924
Creator: Crocco, G. A.