UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 31,123 Matching Results

Search Results

44-BWR WASTE PACKAGE LOADING CURVE EVALUATION

Description: The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the required minimum burnup as a function of initial boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly enrichment that would permit loading of spent nuclear fuel into the 44 BWR waste package configuration as provided in Attachment IV. This calculation is an application of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). The scope of this calculation covers a range of enrichments from 0 through 5.0 weight percent (wt%) U-235, and a burnup range of 0 through 40 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel applications. The intended use of these results will be in establishing BWR waste package configuration loading specifications. Limitations of this evaluation are as follows: (1) The results are based on burnup credit for actinides and selected fission products as proposed in YMP (2003, Table 3-1) and referred to as the ''Principal Isotopes''. Any change to the isotope listing will have a direct impact on the results of this report. (2) The results of 100 percent of the current BWR projected waste stream being able to be disposed of in the 44-BWR waste package with Ni-Gd Alloy absorber plates is contingent upon the referenced waste stream being sufficiently similar to the waste stream received for disposal. (3) The results are based on 1.5 wt% Gd in the Ni-Gd Alloy material and having no tuff inside the waste package. If the Gd loading is reduced or a process to introduce tuff inside the waste package is defined, then this report would need to be reevaluated based on the alternative materials.
Date: August 25, 2004
Creator: Scaglione, J.M.

45-day safety screen results for tank 241-C-204, auger samples 95-Aug-022 and 95-Aug-023

Description: Two auger samples from tank 241-C-204 (C-204) were received at the 222-S Laboratories and underwent safety screening analysis, consisting of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and total alpha activity. The three samples submitted to energetics determination by DSC exceeded the notification limit. As required by the Tank Characterization Plan, the appropriate notifications were made within 24 hours of official confirmation that the limit was exceeded. Secondary analyses have been initiated. Results from secondary analyses will be included in a revision to this report.
Date: August 15, 1995
Creator: Conner, J.M.

A 50 mm bore superconducting dipole with a unique iron yoke structure

Description: A 50 mm bore superconducting dipole with a thin stainless steel collar and a close in elliptical iron yoke was designed in order to obtain a high transfer function SW low saturation effects on the multipoles, and a one meter model was built and tested. Training behavior of the first 1 m model, called D19, is presented at 4.3 K and 1.8 K. At 1.8 K it reached the record field of 10.06 T. The two layer cos {theta} winding uses 30 and 36 strand cables identical to the cables of the 50 mm bore SSC dipole and it has an operating field of 6.6 T at 4.35 K with a current of 5800 A. To evaluate behavior at high fields, the mechanical structure for the model was designed for 10 T. The thin collar itself provides only a minimum prestress of 10 MPa. and the full prestress of 70 MPa is given by the iron yoke. An aluminum spacer is used to control the gap size in the vertically split iron yoke. The tapered gap in the yoke is determined by the size of the Al spacer so that during cooldown there is no loss of coil prestress and the gap remains closed when the magnet is energized.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Dell`Orco, D.; Caspi, S.; O`Neill, J.; Lietzke, A.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C. E. et al.

A 50 mm bore superconducting dipole with a unique iron yoke structure

Description: A 50 mm bore superconducting dipole with a thin stainless steel collar and a close in elliptical iron yoke was designed in order to obtain a high transfer function SW low saturation effects on the multipoles, and a one meter model was built and tested. Training behavior of the first 1 m model, called D19, is presented at 4.3 K and 1.8 K. At 1.8 K it reached the record field of 10.06 T. The two layer cos [theta] winding uses 30 and 36 strand cables identical to the cables of the 50 mm bore SSC dipole and it has an operating field of 6.6 T at 4.35 K with a current of 5800 A. To evaluate behavior at high fields, the mechanical structure for the model was designed for 10 T. The thin collar itself provides only a minimum prestress of 10 MPa. and the full prestress of 70 MPa is given by the iron yoke. An aluminum spacer is used to control the gap size in the vertically split iron yoke. The tapered gap in the yoke is determined by the size of the Al spacer so that during cooldown there is no loss of coil prestress and the gap remains closed when the magnet is energized.
Date: August 1, 1992
Creator: Dell'Orco, D.; Caspi, S.; O'Neill, J.; Lietzke, A.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C. E. et al.

62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with capability for super bunch beams

Description: A 60 TeV center of mass hadron collider is proposed, which has capability of using Superbunch beam. With Superbunch beam, the luminosity is expected to be increased by a factor of 20, compared with conventional acceleration using RF cavities. This hadron collider will be built in two stages with a low field magnet ring first and a high field magnet ring later in the same tunnel. The low field magnet rig will be built with Pipetron scheme, with 7 TeV and 7 TeV proton beams, making a 14 TeV center of mass energy high luminosity collider, using Superbunch beams. In the second stage 10 Tesla high field magnets with twin beams, will be installed. It also utilizes Superbunch beams, realizing high luminosity collider. To accelerate Superbunch beams, the barrier bucket and acceleration induction cells will be used, which are made of induction cells, utilizing FINEMET material. The core loss of the FINEMET is estimated for the whole collider is estimated. The synchrotron radiation of the collider is also estimated. Merits of Superbunch beams over RF bunched beams for the high energy experiments is described.
Date: August 22, 2001
Creator: Takayama, Ryuji Yamada and Ken

80 HP PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYST SYSTEM

Description: The US economy is linked to efficient heavy vehicle transportation and diesel remains the fuel of choice for mass transportation of goods and services. Diesel engines remain the most reliable and cost effective system for commerce. Recent deleterious effects of diesel exhaust on health and environment have led to an urgent need for cost effective technologies that would bring about reduction in NOx and PM. CARB estimates on-road diesel mobile source will contribute almost 50% NOx and 78% PM emissions by 2010. As a result recent Federal and State mandates have been adopted to reduce emissions from diesel exhaust to 1 Gm/bhp.-Hr of NOx and 0.05 Gm/bhp-hr of PM by the year 2007. The 2007 standard is to be achieved in a stepwise manner starting with the standards for 2002 namely 2 Gm/bhp-hr NOx and 0.1 Gm/bhp-hr of PM. 2002 standards are likely to be met by most engine manufacturer by some modified form of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system or by employing a sophisticated engine control system. Importance of cost effective technology requirement is further exaggerated by the fact that in recent years diesel engine production have increased dramatically see figure 1 and has out stripped the gasoline engine production almost 4:1 see figure 2. Currently gasoline engine employs a 3-way catalytic system for NOx and HC reduction and in order for the 3-way system to work the engine is run near stoichiometric air : fuel ratio so that exhaust has virtually no oxygen. This strategy has resulted in a poorer efficiency and hence less efficient utilization of our natural resources. By contrast diesel engine operate on a lean burn principals i.e. air rich and currently there are no commercial technologies available for treating NOx and PM. Technologies being considered for reducing NOx from lean burn (diesel) exhaust are; ...
Date: August 5, 2001
Creator: Slone, Ralph

AN 80 MEGAWATT AQUEOUS HOMOGENEOUS BURNER REACTOR. Reactor Design and Feasibility Problem

Description: An 80 Mw aqueous homogeneous burner reactor suitable for producing 20 Mw of electricity at a remote location is described. The reactor fuel consists of a light water uranyl sulfate solution which acts as its own moderator and coolant. The uranium is highly enriched (93% U/sup 235/). The primary considerstions for the design were simplicity and reliability of the components, automatic demand control and safe for any load change, full xenon override not required, possibility of construction within the immediate future, and economic operation not the cortrolling factor. Reasonably complete studies are presented for the reactor physics, safety, stability, chemistry, hent transfer, and operation of the system. (auth)
Date: August 1, 1957
Creator: Chapman, R.H.; Collins, H.L.; Dollard, W.J.; Fieno, D.; Hernandez- Fragoso, J.; Miller, J.W. et al.

94-1 Research and development project lead laboratory support. Status report, January 1--March 31, 1997

Description: This status report is published for Los Alamos National Laboratory 94-1 Research and Development Project Support. The Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management funds these projects in order to support the storage or disposal of legacy plutonium and plutonium-bearing materials that resulted from weapons production throughout the DOE complex. This report summarizes status and technical progress for Los Alamos 94-1 projects during the second quarter of fiscal year 1997.
Date: August 1, 1997
Creator: Rink, N.A.

100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1

Description: This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.
Date: August 1, 1993

100 Areas, July 23 through July 29. For technical progress letter number 108

Description: The weekly progress for D and F piles is given. Status of the test to determine the cause of white deposits on the horizontal control rods of the F pile is given. Also discussed are studies of process water control and pressure drop, corrosion, and graphite expansion. Test results indicate that graphite expansion has not seriously limited discharge of process tubes.
Date: August 2, 1946
Creator: Jordan, W. E.

100 Areas technical activities report: Physics, July 1949

Description: The pile physics group reports on reactivity power coefficients from the production test No. 105-248-P, the water leak in B pile, graphite properties, xenon equations from the B pile shutdown of March 1946, and reactivity balance. The experimental physics group headed by J.M. West reports on graphite testing, the P-11 project, and shielding. The experimental physics group headed by E.B. Montgomery reports on diffusion length measurements in the DR and H piles. (GHH)
Date: August 22, 1949
Creator: Staebler, U. M.

100 Areas technical activities report - physics, July 1951

Description: This is the monthly 100 areas technical activities report for the physics group for the month of July 1951. This group was concerned with pile related studies. Work discussed includes neutron attenuation measurements in pile shielding test facilities, studies of physical properties of shielding materials (concrete), work on a xenon generator and separation facility, further development and shielding work for a neutron spectrometer, continued work on a magnetic spectrometer, and counting equipment. Studies of neutron fluxes from exponential piles, and criticality studies are also discussed.
Date: August 3, 1951