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ABSOLUTE THERMAL NEUTRON DETERMINATION. PART II. ABSOLUTE BETA COUNTING OF INDIUM FOILS

Description: Correction factors for the effect of thickness on the selfscattering, self-absorption, and backscattering of beta particles from indium foils were determined for irradiated foils of 0.03 to 100 mg/cm/sup 2/. The data were corrected for the activity produced by epithermal neutrons, self-shielding of thermal neutrons by the foil during irradiation, the backscatter from the foil support, and the contributions of gamma and x rays to the counting rate. The multiple beta spectra of indium produced a minimum in the self-absorption and self-scattering correction curve in the GM detector at approximately 1 mg/cm/ sup 2/ and a maximum at approximately 12 mg/cm/sup 2/. The selfabsorption curve for indium in the 2 pi counter has the expected shape for a beta emitter with multiple spectra. The self-scattering and self-absorption correction factors for a 100 mg/cm/sup 2/ indium foil are approximately 1.5 for a GM detector at 7% geometry and approximately 3 for a 2 pi counter. (D.L.C.)
Date: October 1, 1955
Creator: Koontz, R.L.; Greenfield, M.A. & Jarrett, A.A.

Acoustic analysis of ram-jet buzz

Description: From Introduction: "The surging of a system containing a centrifugal- or axial-flow compressor (e.g., refs. 1 to 4) is an example of self-sustained oscillation. Inlets designed for supersonic jet engines also have been observed to induce oscillations (e.g., refs. 5 to 11) which are usually referred to as "buzz." The origin of buzz in ram-jet engines is the subject of the present report."
Date: November 1955
Creator: Mirels, Harold

Acoustic radiation from two-dimensional rectangular cutouts in aerodynamic surfaces

Description: From Introduction: "The experiments in high-speed flow showed that an intense, high-frequency acoustic radiation is an essential feature of the problem. Consequently, a study of the acoustic field (involving schlieren observations and frequency and intensity measurements) was undertaken. This report presents the salient features of the study, which was mainly exploratory."
Date: August 1955
Creator: Krishnamurty, K

S-Acyl Thioctic Acid Derivatives in Aerobacter Aerogenes andScenedesmus

Description: 1. Acetyl thioctic acid has been prepared chemically and i t s chromatographic and acetylating behavior i s described. 2. A C{sup 14} -containing substance has been found in Scenedesmus, photosynthesizing in the presence of a-C{sup 14}-pyruvate, which has properties suggesting that it i s acetyl thioctic acid. 3 . A C{sup 14}-containing substance has been found in Aerobacter aerogenes, metabolizing a-C{sup 14}-pyruvate, which shows the properties of a labile conjugate of thioctic acid with some relatively polar groups. 4. Acetyl thioctic acid i s formed in vitro when light acts on a solution of thioctic acid and pyruvate.
Date: March 30, 1955
Creator: Milhaud, Gerard; Benson, Andrew A.; Fuller, R. Clinton; Milhaud,Vera & Calvin, M.

Adaptation of Combustion Principles to Aircraft Propulsion, Volume I, Basic Considerations in the Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels with Air

Description: The report summarizes source material on combustion for flight-propulsion engineers. First, several chapters review fundamental processes such as fuel-air mixture preparation, gas flow and mixing, flammability and ignition, flame propagation in both homogenous and heterogenous media, flame stabilization, combustion oscillations, and smoke and carbon formation. The practical significance and the relation of these processes to theory are presented. A second series of chapters describes the observed performance and design problems of engine combustors of the principal types. An attempt is made to interpret performance in terms of the fundamental processes and theories previously reviewed. Third, the design of high-speed combustion systems is discussed. Combustor design principles that can be established from basic considerations and from experience with actual combustors are described. Finally, future requirements for aircraft engine combustion systems are examined.
Date: April 1, 1955
Creator: Barnett, Henry C. & Hibbard, Robert R.

Additional measurements of the low-speed static stability of a configuration employing three triangular wing panels and a body of equal length

Description: From Introduction: "The results of an investigation of the low-speed static stability of a simplified model of such an arrangement having one of the airfoils placed vertically on top of the body and the other two as wing panels having negative dihedral are presented in reference 1. In order to provide information for predicting the effects of changes in the basic configuration on the low-speed stability characteristics presented in reference 1, additional measurements have been made."
Date: July 25, 1955
Creator: Delany, Noel K

Aerodynamic and hydrodynamic characteristics of models of some aircraft-towed mine-sweeping devices : TED No. NACA AR 8201

Description: From Introduction: "A study is being conducted by the U.S. Naval Air Development Center to determine the feasibility of several airborne magnetic mine-sweeping methods. The advantages of a satisfactory airborne method are greater safety and speed than are possible with existing surface methods. The three configurations investigated are described in some detail in reference 1 where they are designated as the double Q-sweep, the modified double-catenary sweep and the M-sweep."
Date: December 1, 1955
Creator: Shanks, Robert E

Aerodynamic characteristics and pressure distributions of a 6-percent-thick 49 degree sweptback wing with blowing over half-span and full-span flaps

Description: From Introduction: "The investigation reported herein was initiated to define further the effects on the aerodynamic characteristics and load distribution of a thin, sweptback wing of a low-pressure blowing system and also to provide information on which to base a more thorough study of a complete airplane configuration."
Date: September 20, 1955
Creator: Whittle, Edward F , Jr & Mclemore, H Clyde

Aerodynamic characteristics of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01

Description: Tests have been made in the Langley 4- by 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel at Mach numbers of 1.41, 1.61, and 2.01 of various arrangements of a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane with faired inlets. Tests made of the model equipped with a plain wing, a wing with 6.4 percent conical camber, and a wing with 15 percent conical camber. Body modifications including an extended nose, a modified canopy, and extended afterbody fillets were evaluated. In addition, the effects of a revised vertical tail and two different ventral fins were determined. The results indicated that the use of cambered wings resulted in lower drag in the lift-coefficient range above 0.2. This range, however, is above that which would generally be required for level flight; hence, the usefulness of camber might be confined to increased maneuverability at the higher lifts while its use may be detrimental to the high-speed (low-lift) capabilities.
Date: September 30, 1955
Creator: Spearman, M. Leroy & Driver, Cornelius

Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 0.04956-Scale Model of the Convair F-102A Airplane at Transonic Speeds

Description: Tests have been conducted in the Langley 8-foot transonic tunnel on a 0.04956-scale model of the Convair F-102A airplane which employed an indented and extended fuselage, cambered wing leading edges, and deflected wing tips. Force and moment characteristics were obtained for Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.135 at angles of attack up to 20 . In addition, tests were made over a limited angle-of-attack range to determine the effects of the cambered leading edges, deflected tips, and a nose section with a smooth area distribution. Fuselage modifications employed on the F-102A were responsible for a 25.percent reduction in the minimum drag-coefficient rise between the Mach numbers of 0.85 and 1.075 when compared with that for the earlier versions of the F-102. Although the wing modifications increased the F-102A subsonic minimum drag-coefficient level approximately 0.0020, they produced large decreases in drag at lifting conditions over that for the original (plane-wing) F-102. The F-102A had 15 to 25 percent higher maximum lift-drag ratios than did the original F-102. The F-102A had about 15 percent lower maximum lift-drag ratios at Mach numbers below 0.95 and slightly higher maximum lift-drag ratios at supersonic speeds when compared with those ratios for sn earlier modified-wing version of the F-102. Chordwise wing fences which provided suitable longitudinal stability for the original F-102 were not adequate for the cambered-wing F-102A The pitching-moment curves indicated a region of near neutral stability with possible pitch-up tendencies for the F-102A at high subsonic Mach numbers for lift coefficients between about 0.4 and 0.5.
Date: March 28, 1955
Creator: Tempelmeyer, Kenneth E. & Osborne, Robert S.

Aerodynamic characteristics of a 60 degree delta wing having a half-delta tip control at a Mach number of 4.04

Description: From Introduction: "Numerous tests of tip controls on delta wings at transonic and low supersonic speeds have shown that such configurations provide satisfactory rolling-moment effectiveness, and that the hinge can be controlled by proper location of the hinge line (ref. 1). The purpose of the present tests is to determine the characteristics of such a configuration at Mach number of 4.04 and a Reynolds number of 5.8 X 10^6, based on the wing mean aerodynamic chord."
Date: April 25, 1955
Creator: Ulmann, Edward F & Smith, Fred M