UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 11 Matching Results

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Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region

Description: "Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.

Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Description: Clearing of forests, overgrazing, and soil erosion have greatly depleted the soil of the Ohio Valley in the United States. Farmers should implement agricultural practices that encourage the growth of sod, which has the potential to restore the soil. "The use of grass in increasing the productivity of farm land, in conserving soil on pasture and cropland, and in protecting smaller eroded or erodible areas is discussed in this bulletin." -- p. i
Date: 1939
Creator: Welton, Kenneth

Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats

Description: Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
Date: 1910
Creator: Warburton, C. W. (Clyde William), 1879-1950

The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It

Description: "Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Luginbill, Philip

Soy Beans

Description: "The recent enormous exportations of soy beans and soy-bean meal from Manchuria to Europe would seem to indicate that there is practically an unlimited market for this product. It is now believed that by the selection of proper varieties, of which the number is very large, the soy bean can be profitably grown in practically all parts of the cotton belt as a grain crop." -- p. 2. In addition to discussion of soy bean varieties, the cultivation of soy beans is discussed in relation to their use as hay, pasturage, grain, and animal feeds.
Date: 1909
Creator: Piper, Charles V. (Charles Vancouver), 1867-1926 & Nielsen, H. T. (Harold T.)

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Date: 1918
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972

Wheat Scab and Its Control

Description: This bulletin discusses wheat scab, a fungal disease of wheat, rye, barley, and oats that is caused by a parasite. It describes the appearance of afflicted crops as well as the parasite's life cycle and proposes a variety of control measures.
Date: 1921
Creator: Johnson, Aaron G. & Dickson, James G. (James Geere), b. 1891