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Letter from Paris LeCocq Jr. to Commission Regarding Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division
Letter from Paris LeCocq, Jr. regarding the closing of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division
Executive Correspondence - Letter from Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., Governor of Indiana to the Chairman thanking him for how well he's managed the difficult BRAC process
Executive Correspondence - Letter from Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr., Governor of Indiana to the Chairman thanking him for how well he's managed the difficult BRAC process - Installations: Crane and DFAS/Bean Center
[Letters from Concerned Citizens to the BRAC Commission - July 2005]
Letters from concerned citizens to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission (BRAC) criticizing the recommendations regarding Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division in Indiana.
[Letters from Concerned Citizens to the BRAC Commission - August 2005]
Letters from concerned citizens to the BRAC Commission regarding Naval Surface Warfare Center Crane Division.
Community Correspondence - Crane
Letters and newspaper clippings received from concerned citizens opposing the closure of NSWC Crane
Community Input - Naval Support Activity CRANE - IN Technical Cross Service Groups Crane
Weapons & Armaments Research, Development, & Acquisition, and Test & Evaluation Center Recommendations Analysis and Alternatives to the BRAC Recommendations to Realign NSWC Crane
Base Visit Trip Report - Naval Support Activity- CRANE IN
Summary of Base Visit Report to Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane , IN 6 June 05
Thickness of Bituminous Coal and Lignite Seams Mined in the United States in 1945
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing bituminous coal and lignite seams found in the United States. The thickness of seams from several U.S. states is compared, as well as the mining methods employed. This report includes maps, tables, and illustrations.
Investigation of Fire in the Kings Mine, Princeton Mining Company, Princeton, Indiana
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the fire that occurred in Kings Mine in Princeton, Indiana. The circumstances surrounding the fire, including mining methods and conditions are presented. This report includes tables, and illustrations.
Safety Cars of the United States Bureau of Mines
Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the mine stations and safety cars used to reach miners in distress. As stated in the report, "the purpose, equipment, personnel, and construction of its safety cars" is presented. This report includes an illustration, and a map.
The Southern Corn Rootworm and Farm Practices to Control It
"Of all corn pests in the South one of the most serious is the larva, or young, of the 12-spotted cucumber beetle -- the so-called southern corn rootworm. True to its name, it feeds on the roots, but in young corn it also drills a small hole in the stem just above the first circle of roots, boring out the crown and killing the bud.... Progressive farming methods, as described in this bulletin, will reduce the ravages of this insect. Burn over waste places to destroy dead grass, weeds, and rubbish in which the beetles winter. If possible, avoid planting corn in fields which contained corn the year before. Enrich the soil by planting legumes so that the corn will have a better chance of recovering from rootworm injury. Protect the bobwhite. This bird destroys many beetles of the rootworm. By careful observations, extending over a period of years, find out the dates between which the rooworm does the most damage; then time your planting so that it will fall either before or after these dates, taking into consideration, of course, other important factors in crop production." -- p. 2
The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control
Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer
This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
The Soft Red Winter Wheats
"At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
The Rosette Disease of Wheat and Its Control
Report discussing the newly-discovered rosette disease of wheat, the cause of which is still unknown. Discussion includes the disease's geographic distribution, affected crops, symptoms, and methods of control.
Successful Farming on Eighty-Acre Farms in Central Indiana
"This bulletin is primarily a story of the organization and management of successful 80-acre farms in central Indiana and adjacent areas which are following the type of farming that prevails in that part of the country.... Some of the leading principles of good farm organization and management on 80-acre farms are illustrated by the facts brought out regarding what the successful farmers on 80-acre farms have accomplished, not in a single year but over a series of years. The bulletin sets before the 80-acre farmers who are following the prevailing type of farming standards which some farmers have reached and which are believed to be within the reach of a great many other 80-acre farmers in central Indiana and adjacent areas." -- p. ii
Alsike Clover
Report discussing the distribution and cultivation of the leguminous crop alsike clover, which grows primarily in the northeastern United States. Topics discussed include soil requirements, seeding, uses, and insect enemies and diseases.
The Carpet Beetle or "Buffalo Moth"
Report discussing the carpet beetle (also known as the buffalo moth) and its geographic distribution, life cycle, habits, and methods for exterminating it.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
The Culture of Winter Wheat in the Eastern United States
Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for growing winter wheat in the eastern United States. Topics discussed include soils adapted to wheat cultivation, fertilizers, seed selection and preparation, and crop rotation.
Soy Beans
"The recent enormous exportations of soy beans and soy-bean meal from Manchuria to Europe would seem to indicate that there is practically an unlimited market for this product. It is now believed that by the selection of proper varieties, of which the number is very large, the soy bean can be profitably grown in practically all parts of the cotton belt as a grain crop." -- p. 2. In addition to discussion of soy bean varieties, the cultivation of soy beans is discussed in relation to their use as hay, pasturage, grain, and animal feeds.
Sixty-Day and Kherson Oats
Report discussing the results of experiments undertaken to determine the viability of early oats in different regions of the United States since early oats typically thrive only in the Corn Belt and Great Plains regions.
The Cultivation of Peppermint and Spearmint
This report discusses the cultivation of peppermint and spearmint in the United States, especially in the northeastern and mid-western United States. Climate and soil conditions, fertilizers, diseases and pests, and the costs of cultivation are discussed.
Grain Farming in the Corn Belt with Live Stock as a Side Line
"This bulletin is written to suggest to the corn-belt farmer of the Middle West -- especially the farmer whose soil has been run down by continuous grain farming -- some ways of coordinating and 'cashing in' the scientific advice offered him in hundreds of bulletins already published.... Briefly, these are the conclusions reached by our most successful corn-belt farmer and agricultural experts: To make a money-maker of a farm that has become a losing proposition through steady grain farming you must in addition to raising standard grain crops -- (1) Grow legumes, (2) Raise live stock as a side line, (3) Keep accounts of receipts and expenditures, (4) Mix horse sense with scientific agriculture, (5) Try to secure enough capital to enable you to farm right, (6) Stick to whatever policy you adopt long enough to try it out, and (7) Confer with your County Agent and make a careful study of the bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture." -- p. 1-3.
Sweet Clover on Corn Belt Farms
"Sweet clover is now grown successfully on many farms in the corn belt, both in rotation and as a catch crop to be plowed under. It has proved excellent for hay and pasture, and is unequaled by any other legume for soil improvement. Sweet clover may be used to good advantage for silage, and on some farms, with proper management, it is a profitable seed crop. Mixed with bluegrass, it makes a pasture of nearly double the carrying capacity of bluegrass alone. The object of this bulletin is to present details of management and of the more important farm practices followed on some of the successful corn-belt farms on which sweet clover is grown as one of the principal crops of the rotation. Cropping systems are outlined for farms of different types, and special attention is called to the three essentials of success in growing the crop -- lime, inoculation, and scarified seed." -- p. 2
The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control
Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, sucking the juices of the plant and causing a swelling in the stem. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks no other kind of plant. The injury which it does to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the depredations of these two insects are often confused by farmers. This paper is intended, therefore, to give a brief outline of the life history and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended." -- p. 3-4
Alfalfa on Corn-Belt Farms
"Alfalfa, on Corn Belt farms, if introduced in any considerable acreage, requires a great amount of labor at the most critical stage of the cultivation of corn. This bulletin tells how the more successful Corn Belt growers fit alfalfa into their cropping systems without interfering seriously with labor schedules. This is done in the main by speeding up the haying operations and corn cultivation by the use of labor-saving implements and more efficient methods. To some extent, the use of alfalfa for pasture serves to reduce the labor difficulties. The methods of handling the alfalfa crop that have been worked out by some of the more experienced Corn Belt growers are illustrated by several concrete examples of good management. The material for this bulletin was obtained on 235 Corn Belt farms on which alfalfa is grown successfully." -- p. 2
Influence of the Tractor on Use of Horses
This bulletin promotes the use of tractors on farms in the Corn Belt of the United States in order to increase agricultural productivity. It discusses the possible uses of tractors and the displacement of horses on farms.
Beekeeping in the Clover Region
"Beekeeping methods suitable for the clover region are well developed but many beekeepers of this region are failing to obtain the full available honey crop because of deficiencies in their practice. A system of management is here given which will result in a full crop from these sources. The variation in the value of the clovers to the beekeeper is also discussed and the methods to be followed in bringing the clover region back to its former prominence in honey production are outlined." -- p. 2
Beekeeping in the Buckwheat Region
"The production of the full honey crop from buckwheat requires a plan of apiary management quite different from that of most other beekeeping regions. A system of management is here given which will result in a full honey crop and at the same time control European foulbrood, which is so prevalent in the buckwheat region. Methods are also given which may be used in case the clovers are valuable as sources of nectar." -- p. 2
Beef Production in the Corn Belt
This bulletin discusses beef production in the Corn Belt of the United States with special regard to feed preparation, cattle selection, and methods for fattening cattle.
Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region
"Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
Wheat Scab and Its Control
This bulletin discusses wheat scab, a fungal disease of wheat, rye, barley, and oats that is caused by a parasite. It describes the appearance of afflicted crops as well as the parasite's life cycle and proposes a variety of control measures.
Take-All of Wheat and Its Control
This bulletin discusses take-all, a fungal disease of wheat, and methods for controlling it. It also describes the distribution, symptoms, and causes of take-all.
The Hard Red Winter Wheats
This bulletin discusses the classes and varieties of hard red winter wheats and the areas in which they are successfully grown. Among the varieties discussed are Turkey, Kharkof, Kanred, Blackhull, Minturki, and Baeska.
Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region
Clearing of forests, overgrazing, and soil erosion have greatly depleted the soil of the Ohio Valley in the United States. Farmers should implement agricultural practices that encourage the growth of sod, which has the potential to restore the soil. "The use of grass in increasing the productivity of farm land, in conserving soil on pasture and cropland, and in protecting smaller eroded or erodible areas is discussed in this bulletin." -- p. i
Newport Chemical Depot, IN Recommendation
Newport Chemical Depot, Indiana, Recommendations base visit book, by George Delgado, Joint cross Service Team, 06-06-2005
Letter From G. Roderick Henry of Terre Haute, IN Chamber of Commerce dtd June 17, 2005
Executive Correspondence: Letter From G. Roderick Henry of Terre Haute, IN Chamber of Commerce, dated June 17, 2005, regarding the 181st Fighter Wing of the Indiana Air National Guard.
Base Input from BRAC Commission Visit to Crane Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indiana
Base Input from BRAC Commission Visit to Crane Division, Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indiana. Document includes the covers of publications submitted by Crane NAVSURFWARCEN, Indiana. Publications are Warfighter Solutions and The Commodore. Publications are available for viewing at the Crystal City, VA BRAC Library location.
Letter from Kevin D. Burke to Chairman Principi dtd 17 June 2005
Executive Correspondence - Letter from Mayor Kevin D. Burke, Indiana, to Chairman Principi, Regarding Indiana Air National Guard 181st Fighter Wing.
A CRS Review of 10 States: Home and Community-Based Services — States Seek to Change the Face of Long-Term Care: Indiana
Many states have devoted significant efforts to respond to the desire for home and community-based care for persons with disabilities and their families. Nevertheless, financing of nursing home care, chiefly by Medicaid, still dominates most states’ spending for long-term care today. To assist Congress in understanding issues that states face in providing long-term care services, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) undertook a study of 10 states in 2002. This report, one in a series of 10 state reports, presents background and analysis about long-term care in Indiana.
Injury Experience in the Coking Industry, 1951
From Introduction and Summary: "Reports from operating companies showed that 25,715 men worked at coke ovens in 1951, about 6 percent more than were employed in 1950 and, except in 1943, the largest work force since 1930, when 28,139 men were employed. The work time for all employees was 70,190,493 man-hours. The returns indicated an average of 344 work days per man as compared with 341 days in the previous year. Accidents at the ovens resulted in the death of 10 and injury to 768 workers, both of these figures representing fewer injuries than in 1950."
Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910 Part 2. Descriptions of Samples
From Introduction: "This volume contains the descriptions of the samples whose analyses are published in the preceding volume, Part I of this bulletin. The descriptions have been compiled from the notebooks of the persons who collected the samples, have been condensed from accounts given in published reports of the United States Geological Survey, or have furnished by the collection themselves. Inasmuch as the descriptions represent the work of many persons during a period of six years, and inasmuch as they were recorded under widely differing conditions, they necessarily vary in fullness detail."
Coal-Mine Accidents in the United States and Foreign Countries
From Introduction: "The lack of comparable and accurate statistics of coal-mine accidents in the united States as a whole led the Bureau of Mines in 1911 to undertake the collection of such data. The mining departments of the leading foreign coal-producing countries have long taken cognizance of the importance of statistics. The bureau feels that in presenting the tables embodied in this report it is offering the and comparable statistics of coal-min accidents for the country as a whole that have ever been published."
Oil and Gas Wells through Workable Coal Beds: Papers and Discussions
From Preface: "In carrying out such a policy with reference to the subject under consideration, the Bureau of Mines invited the State geologists, mine inspectors, and a number of coal operators and oil and gas well drillers from the States interested to meet representatives of the Bureau of Mines in Pittsburgh, Pa., for a discussion of the subject during February 7 and February 8, 1913. This adjourned meeting of the conference will be held at an early date and its report will be printed in a later edition of this bulletin, with such additional suggestions as may be received by the Bureau of Mines. The bureau will be glad, therefore, to receive at the earliest practicable date any additional suggestions or any additional information throwing light on the matters discussed in this bulletin."
Analyses of Coals in the United States with Descriptions of Mine and Field Samples Collected between July 1, 1904 and June 30, 1910: Part 1. -- Analyses
From Significance and value of Analyses of Coal: "The analyses published in this report cover samples of coal collected in many different parts of the country with unusual care by experiences men, in such manner as to make them representative of extensive beds of coal."
Analyses of Tipple and Delivered Samples of Coal: (Collected During the Fiscal Years 1948 to 1950 Inclusive)
From Forward: "This bulletin is the first of a new series, which includes analyses of only tipple and delivered coal. It covers samples collected throughout the United States from July 1, 1947 to June 30, 1950 (fiscal years 1948-50). It is planned that future publications of this series will cover a period of one fiscal year only and be issued as soon as possible after June 30 of each year."
Potash Salts from Texas-New Mexico Polyhalite Deposits: Commercial Possibilities, Proposed Technology, and Pertinent Salt-Solution Equilibria
From Introduction: "Figure 1 shows the location of sources that have been either exploited or seriously considered at one time or another, super-imposed upon a map indicating by small letters the order of consumption of K2O in the leading States; the amount used in these States, together with the percentage of the total consumption of potash used as fertilizer in the United States in 1939, is given in table 1. Figure 2 shows the domestic production and total consumption of potassium salts, in terms of tons of K2O, with the value per unit at the plants, for each year since 1913. Considered together, these two figures tell a significant story."
Coal-Washing Investigations: Methods and Tests
From Introduction: "The investigations described in this bulletin are confined to a study of the washing characteristics of bituminous coals. The washing characteristics of coals from many of the most important coal-producing fields of the Eastern and Central States were examined."
[Letter from John W. Yarbor to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission - June 2005]
Letter from John W. Yarbor to the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission regarding recommendations made on page Tech-19 of Section 10 of Vol. I, Part II to Create and Integrated Weapons and Armaments Specialty Site for Guns and Ammunition. Yarbor voices such concerns as conflicts with site consolidation, fiscal issues, andretention of trained personnel.