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Uses of Advanced Pulsed Neutron Sources. Report of a Workshop Held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 21-24, 1975

Description: This report contains the conclusions that were drawn by nine panels of scientists in the fields of Biology; Chemical Spectroscopy; Chemical Structures of Crystalline Solids; Chemical Structures of Disordered Solids and Inhomogeneous Systems; Dynamics of Solids, Liquids, Glasses, and Gases; Magnetism; Neutron Sources; and Radiation Effects. The nine panel reports describe the applications found in these scientific areas, accompanying them with conceptual instruments designed for the measurements and with calculations to establish feasibility.
Date: 1976?
Creator: Carpenter, S. A.

The Changeable Interaction between Soils and Pressure Cells: Tests and Reviews at the Waterways Experiment Station

Description: Partial abstract: "The principal subjects of the report are the often neglected changes in the interaction of soil and pressure cells with consequent changes in relative errors in cell registrations. The report contains (a) a brief account of the development and use of soil pressure cells; (b) a review of proposed theories for soil-cell interaction; (c) a delayed account of tests with Waterways Experiment Station pressure cells placed in a large triaxial device; and (d) tentative conclusions plus suggestions for calibration, installation, and measuring procedures."
Date: June 1976
Creator: Hvorslev, Mikael Juul

Platinum Deposits of the Goodnews Bay District, Alaska

Description: From abstract: Platinum placers were discovered in 1926 in a small area south of Goodnews Bay, in southwestern Alaska. Beginning in 1927, the placers were worked for 7 years by small-scale mining methods; in later years dragline excavators and a dredge were utilized. These deposits are important, not only because they are of high grade but because they are the only commercial source of platinum metals in the United States. This report details the deposits in this district.
Date: 1976
Creator: Mertie, John Beaver, Jr.

Distribution and Movement of Zinc and Other Heavy Metals in South San Francisco Bay, California

Description: From introduction: The primary objective of this study was to determine the net transport of zinc into the study area from urbanized perimeter, out of the study area across the northern boundary of the study area, and across the sediment-water interface within the study area, all within a limited time period. A secondary objective was to assemble as much data on other trace metals--their concentrations and chemical states in water, suspended solids, sediments and interstitial fluids--as possible within the time and funding constraints of the study in order to describe the existing trace metal conditions in the south bay. Thus the bulk of effort was directed toward evaluating the distribution and movements of zinc, but the data collected on the distribution and movements of zinc, but the data collected on the distribution of other metals is important and is reported here.
Date: February 1976
Creator: Bradford, Wesley L.

Waterlogging in an Alluvial Aquifer near Lake Minnequa, Pueblo, Colorado

Description: Abstract: The Lake Minnequa area, located immediately south of the Arkansas River, is mantled with as much as 46 feet (14 meters) of alluvium covering bedrock of Pierre Shale and Niobrara Formation. Surface water enters the area by the Minnequa Canal and the St. Charles Flood Ditch. The water is stored in Lake Minnequa and other reservoirs. Seepage from St. Charles Reservoirs No. 2 and No. 3 is the major source of water to the alluvial aquifer. The depth of the water table ranges from 0 to 40 feet (0 to 12.2 meters). A 0.5-square-mile (1.3-square-kilometers) area immediately south of Lake Minnequa has a water table less than 6 feet (1.8 meters) below land surface. Lake Minnequa is the principal cause of the shallow water table and resulting waterlogged soil. The bedrock hill east of Lake Minnequa and ground-water flow also contribute to the problem. To eliminate the waterlogging problem, the water table would have to be at least 6 feet (1.8 meters) below land surface. Possible alternatives for eliminating the problem include lowering the water, level in Lake Minnequa, placing a network of dewaterinq wells, or constructing a drainage system in the waterlogged area.
Date: July 1976
Creator: Emmons, Patrick J.

Proposed Cross-Florida Barge Canal: Water Quality Aspects with a Section on Waste-Assimilative Capacity

Description: Abstract: The route of the partly completed Cross-Florida Barge Canal follows the St. Johns, Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers. If the canal is ·completed, the Summit Reach, connecting the Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers will be excavated into the Floridan aquifer. Large springs that discharge from this limestone and dolomite aquifer flow to the Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers.
Date: February 1976
Creator: Merritt, M. L.

Availability and Chemical Characteristics of Ground Water in Central La Plata County, Colorado

Description: From introduction: This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the central part of La Plata County, Colorado. The purpose of the investigation is to describe the geologic units and the availability and quality of ground water in the central part of the county.
Date: 1976
Creator: Brogden, Robert E. & Giles, T. F.

Availability and Chemical Quality of Ground Water in the Crystal River and Cattle Creek Drainage Basins near Glenwood Springs, West-Central Colorado

Description: From introduction: This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the Crystal River and Cattle Creek drainage basins...The purpose of the investigation was to describe the geologic units, the aquifers and their characteristics, and the availability and chemical quality of ground water in the study area.
Date: 1976
Creator: Brogden, Robert E. & Giles, T. F.

Land-Surface Subsidence in the Area of Moses Lake Near Texas City, Texas

Description: Abstract: Removal of water, oil, and gas from the subsurface in Harris and Galveston Counties has caused declines in fluid pressures, which in turn have resulted in subsidence of the land surface. Subsidence of the land surface at Moses Lake is due principally to the removal of ground water in adjacent areas. Significant subsidence of the land surface at Moses Lake began after 1900, and as much as 1.8 feet (0.55 meters) of subsidence had occurred in the area by 1973. Probable future subsidence was calculated by two methods for two loading situations. In the first loading situation, case 1, the artesian head in the middle Chicot aquifer, in the Alta Lorna Sand (Rose, 1943), and in the Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at respective rates of 1, 3, and 3 feet (0.3, 0.9, and 0.9 meters) per year until 1980 and then cease. In the second loading situation, case 2, the artesian head in the middle Chicot aquifer, in the Alta Lorna Sand, and in the Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at respective rates of 1, 3, and 3 feet (0.3, 0.9, and 0.9 meters) per year until 1990 and then cease.
Date: October 1976
Creator: Gabrysch, R. K. & Bonnet, C. W.

Technical Manual For Estimating Low-Flow Frequency Characteristics of Streams in the Susquehanna River Basin

Description: Abstract: This report presents procedures for estimating low-flow frequency characteristics for streams in the Susquehanna River basin. The techniques can be used at ungaged sites as well as sites where insufficient data are available to make a reliable estimate. Streams have been divided into two types major and minor. Major streams are the Susquehanna, West Branch Susquehanna, Juniata, and Chemung Rivers. Points on these streams with drainage areas of more than 2,000 square miles (5,180 kilometers) are included in this category. Points on these streams with drainage areas of less than 2,000 square miles fall into the minor stream category. Generally minor streams are herein defined as those draining less than 2,000 square miles (5,180 kilometers). Multiple-regression techniques have been used to develop relations for estimating the 1-, 3-, 7-, 30-, and 183-day duration low flows at recurrence intervals of 10, 20, 50 and 100 years for annual series data and the 1-, 3-, 7-, and 30-day duration low flows, at the same recurrence intervals, for six individual months, May through October, inclusive.
Date: June 1976
Creator: Armbruster, Jeffrey T.

WATEQF: A FORTRAN IV Version of WATEQ, a Computer Program for Calculating Chemical Equilibrium of Natural Waters

Description: Abstract: WATEQF is a FORTRAN IV computer program that models the thermodynamic speciation of inorganic ions and complex species in solution for a given water analysis. The original version (WATEQ) was written in 1973 by A. H. Truesdell and B. F. Jones in Programming Language/one (PL/1). With but a few exceptions, the thermochemical data, speciation, activity coefficients, and general calculation procedure of WATEQF is identical to the PL/1 version. This report notes the differences between WATEQF and WATEQ, demonstrates how to set up the input data to execute WATEQF, provides a test case for comparison, and makes available a listing of WATEQF.
Date: September 1976
Creator: Plummer, L. Niel; Jones, Blair F, & Truesdell, Alfred H.

Land-Surface Subsidence at Seabrook, Texas

Description: Abstract: Removal of water, oil, and gas from the subsurface in Harris and Galveston Counties, Texas, has caused a decline in fluid pressures, which in turn has resulted in subsidence of the land surface. Subsidence of the land surface at Seabrook is due principally to the removal of water. Significant subsidence of the land surface probably began after 1920, and a minimum of about 3.3 feet (1.0 m) and a maximum of about 4.3 feet (1.3 m) of subsidence had occurred at Seabrook by 1973. Probable future subsidence was calculated by two different methods for each of two different loading situations. In the first loading situation, case I, the artesian heads in the Alta Lorna Sand (Rose, 1943) and Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at the respective rates of 8 feet (2.4 m) per year and 7 feet (2.1 m) per year until 1980 and then cease. In the second loading situation, case II, the artesian heads in the Alta Lorna Sand and Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at rates of 8 and 7 feet (2.4 and 2.1 m) per year until 1990 and then cease.
Date: October 1976
Creator: Gabrysch, R. K. & Bonnet, C. W.

Availability of Ground Water near Carmel, Hamilton County, Indiana

Description: Abstract: Flow in the unconsolidated glacial deposits near the city of Carmel in central Indiana was simulated by a digital-computer model in a study of hydraulic characteristics of the deposits. The study shows that 21 • 3 million gallons per day (933 liters per second) of additional water could be withdrawn from the aquifer for an indefinite period of time. This pumpage is approximately 5 million gallons per day (219 liters per second) above the projected water needs of Carmel for 1990. Saturated thickness, transmissivity, and storage coefficient of the outwash aquifer along the White River east of Carmel were determined, using available data supplemented by test drilling . The saturated thickness of the aquifer ranges from 10 to 110 feet 0 to 34 meters ); transmissivity ranges from 1,000 feet squared per day (93 meters squared per day) to 24 ,000 feet squared per day (2 ,230 meters squared per day); and the average storage coefficient is 0.11.
Date: May 1976
Creator: Gillies, D. C.

History of Dredging and Filling of Lagoons in the San Juan Area, Puerto Rico

Description: Abstract: Laguna La Torrecilla, Laguna de Pinones, Laguna San Jose, and Laguna del Condado, in the San Juan, Puerto Rico area, are located within a metropolitan area of more than 1 million people. Bathymetric maps made during the study, in 1973, showed that Lagunas La Torrecilla, San Jose, and del Condado have been modified by dredging and filling; whereas, Laguna de Pinones has remained in a near natural state. Laguna La Torrecilla has been dredged to a depth, in places, of about 18 metres, and Lagunas San Jose and del Condado, in places to about 11 meters. Dredging in the San Juan lagoons has been harmful, beneficial, and in a few instances has had little or no noticeable effect on the water quality. Usually, dredging in the connecting canals has been beneficial if the water entering the lagoons through the canals was of better quality than the water in the lagoon. Dredging in the mouths of lagoons has been beneficial; whereas, filling or blocking the mouths has been harmful.
Date: September 1976
Creator: Ellis, S. R.

Time of Travel of Solutes in Selected Reaches of the Sandusky River Basin, Ohio: 1972 and 1973

Description: Abstract: A time of travel study of a 106-mile (171-kilometer) reach of the Sandusky River and a 39-mile (63-kilometer) reach of Tymochtee Creek was made to determine the time required for water released from Killdeer Reservoir on Tymochtee Creek to reach selected downstream points. In general, two dye sample runs were made through each subreach to define the time-discharge relation for approximating travel times at selected discharges within the measured range, and time-discharge graphs are presented for 38 subreaches. Graphs of dye dispersion and variation in relation to time are given for three selected sampling sites. For estimating travel time and velocities between points in the study reach, tables for selected flow durations are given. Duration curves of daily discharge for four index stations are presented to indicate the low-flow characteristics and for use in shaping downward extensions of the time-discharge curves.
Date: November 1976
Creator: Westfall, Arthur O.

Technique for Estimating Magnitude and Frequency of Floods in Kentucky

Description: Abstract: This report presents flood magnitude and frequency relations applicable to 'unregulated streams in Kentucky. The relations are based on flood data at 117 gaging stations in Kentucky and 14 in adjacent states having 10 or more years of record not significantly affected by man-made changes . Equations that relate flood magnitude and frequency to contributing drainage area in 16 geographic areas may be used to estimate magnitude of future floods with recurrence intervals of as much as 100 years on gaged and ungaged streams having drainage areas of 10 to 4,300 square miles (25 .9, to 11,100 square kilometers) . Estimating equations are also presented in graphical form for the convenience of the user . Additional graphs are presented to estimate flood magnitude for selected recurrence intervals along the Cumberland, Kentucky, and Ohio Rivers .
Date: November 1976
Creator: Hannum, Curtis H.

Water Resources of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation, Oregon

Description: From introduction: The present study is an inventory and appraisal of the water resources of the reservation, including determination of flow in major streams, yield of water to wells and springs, and quality of water. This study was conducted in cooperation with the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation. The cooperation and assistance of many officials of the Confederated Tribes, of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and of the Indian Health Service helped greatly. Well-drilling and test-pumping data and other information generously furnished by Satish Puri, Tribal Engineer, were especially helpful.
Date: 1976
Creator: Robison, J. H. & Laenen, Antonius