UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 180 Matching Results

Search Results

Silicosis and Tuberculosis Among Miners of the Tri-State District of Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri--[Part] 1: For the Year Ended June 30, 1928

Description: Report issued by the Bureau of Mines discussing the occurrence of tuberculosis and silicosis among mine workers of the Tri-State district including Oklahoma, Kansas, and Missouri. Past history of the diseases are presented, as well as the standard means of examination of miners. This report includes a map, tables, illustrations, and photographs.
Date: 1933
Creator: Sayers, R. R.; Meriwether, F. V.; Lanza, A. J. & Adams, W. W.

Annual Report of Research and Technologic Work on Coal: Fiscal Year 1941

Description: Report issued by the U.S. Bureau of Mines discussing the annual report over the research and technology of coal during 1941. As stated in the foreword, "these investigations increase our fund of exact knowledge on the properties and composition of American coals and lead to better methods in mining, preparing, storing, and utilizing coal" (p. 4). This report includes tables, illustrations, photographs, and a map.
Date: November 1941
Creator: Fieldner, Arno Carl & Schmidt, L. D.

Eradication of Bermuda Grass

Description: This bulletin describes Bermuda grass, a plant that is both highly valuable to pastures and also invasive in the southern United States, and gives suggestions for its control. Possible methods for eradication include the strategic use of shade, winterkilling, fallowing, hog grazing, and tilling practices.
Date: 1918
Creator: Hansen, Albert A.

The Rough-Headed Corn Stalk-Beetle in the Southern States and Its Control

Description: "Within recent years an increasing number of reports of serious damage to the corn crop by a robust black beetle have been received from most of the Southern States. A noteworthy outbreak occurred during the early summer of 1914 in the tidewater section of Virginia. As very little was known regarding the natural history of this pest, this bulletin has been designed to supply this information. By following the control measures recommended herein it is hoped that the ravages of this pest may be largely overcome in the future." -- p. 3
Date: 1917
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.

The Soft Red Winter Wheats

Description: "At least 66 distinct varieties of soft red winter wheat, known by nearly 400 different names, are grown commercially in the United States, and additional varieties are grown experimentally. These varieties differ widely in yield, adaptation, milling and baking value, and other characteristics. The most widely grown varieties in the United States in order of importance are Fultz, Fulcaster, Mediterranean, Poole, Red May, Red Wave, and Harvest Queen. The area of each of these varieties in 1919 varied from about 4,800,000 acres to about 1,000,000 acres." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Leighty, C. E. (Clyde Evert), b. 1882 & Martin, John H. (John Holmes), 1893-

Strawberry Growing in the South

Description: This report discusses strawberry cultivation in the southern United States, especially with regard to field location, soil and climate requirements, fertilizers, harvesting, varieties, and strawberry by-products
Date: 1915
Creator: Thompson, H. C. (Homer Columbus), b. 1885

A Successful Alabama Diversification Farm

Description: "In this bulletin is given the record of a 65-acre hog farm in the black prairie region of Alabama. The method of farming described is applicable to the entire area in which corn, alfalfa, and Bermuda grass can be grown. This area includes the black lands of Texas, the river bottoms of Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, and Mississippi, and the alluvial soils generally in all the Southern States.... The primary object in the work of this farm was to demonstrate that hog farming is practicable in this territory, and three years' experience has led us to the conclusion that the production of alfalfa hay in this region can also be made highly profitable.... The system of farming established on the diversification farm at Uniontown, Alabama, was planned with the special view of increasing the fertility of the soil and reducing the cost of tillage by doing away with hillside ditches and adopting improved methods of cultivation." -- p. 5
Date: 1907
Creator: Crosby, M. A.; Duggar, J. F. (John Frederick), 1868- & Spillman, W. J. (William Jasper)

Experiment Station Work, [Volume] 67

Description: Bulletin issued by the U. S. Department of Agriculture compiling selected articles from the Agricultural Experiment Stations. This bulletin contains articles on: Screening Cabbage Seed Beds, Spraying Apple Orchards, New Type of Spray Nozzle, Preparation of Corn for Hogs, Experiments in Beef Production, Preparation of Choice Hams, and Factors Affecting Fat in Cream.
Date: 1912
Creator: United States. Office of Experiment Stations.

Grain Farming in the Corn Belt with Live Stock as a Side Line

Description: "This bulletin is written to suggest to the corn-belt farmer of the Middle West -- especially the farmer whose soil has been run down by continuous grain farming -- some ways of coordinating and 'cashing in' the scientific advice offered him in hundreds of bulletins already published.... Briefly, these are the conclusions reached by our most successful corn-belt farmer and agricultural experts: To make a money-maker of a farm that has become a losing proposition through steady grain farming you must in addition to raising standard grain crops -- (1) Grow legumes, (2) Raise live stock as a side line, (3) Keep accounts of receipts and expenditures, (4) Mix horse sense with scientific agriculture, (5) Try to secure enough capital to enable you to farm right, (6) Stick to whatever policy you adopt long enough to try it out, and (7) Confer with your County Agent and make a careful study of the bulletins of the United States Department of Agriculture." -- p. 1-3.
Date: 1916
Creator: Vrooman, Carl Schurz, 1872-1966