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Report of the 2nd National Ecosystem Modeling Workshop (NEMoW II) : Bridging the Credibility Gap - Dealing with Uncertainty in Ecosystem Models

Description: The following document addresses the terms of reference (TOR) such that a group of scientists forming the National Ecosystem Modeling Workshops (NEMoWs) could explore the facets of ecosystem model (EM) uncertainty and make pragmatic suggestions of how the NMFS could proceed in its EM endeavors by dealing with uncertainty using a suite of "best practices" recommended herein.
Date: January 2010
Creator: Link, J. S.; Ihde, T. F.; Townsend, H. M.; Osgood, K. E.; Schirripa, M. J.; Kobayashi, D. R. et al.
open access

Fisheries Ecosystem Model of the Chesapeake Bay: Methodology, Parameterization, and Model Exploration

Description: Report on the construction of a model to manage fisheries in the Chesapeake Bay region, to see how stocks affect the food web and provide quantified estimations. "This report describes an ecosystem model of the Chesapeake Bay, the Chesapeake Bay Fisheries Ecosystem Model (CBFEM), prepared using the Ecopath with Ecosim approach and software" (p. 5).
Date: October 2009
Creator: Christensen, Villy; Beattie, Alasdair; Buchanan, Claire; Ma, Hongguang; Martell, Steven J. D.; Latour, Robert J. et al.
Location: None
open access

USXR Based MHD, Transport, Equilibria and Current Profile Diagnostics for NSTX. Final Report

Description: The present report resumes the research activities of the Plasma Spectroscopy/Diagnostics Group at Johns Hopkins University performed on the NSTX tokamak at PPPL during the period 1999-2009. During this period we have designed and implemented XUV based diagnostics for a large number of tasks: study of impurity content and particle transport, MHD activity, time-resolved electron temperature measeurements, ELM research, etc. Both line emission and continuum were used in the XUV range. New technics and novel methods have been devised within the framework of the present research. Graduate and post-graduate students have been involved at all times in addition to the senior research personnel. Several tens of papers have been published and lectures have been given based on the obtained results at conferences and various research institutions (lists of these activities were attached both in each proposal and in the annual reports submitted to our supervisors at OFES).
Date: June 1, 2009
Creator: Finkenthal, Michael
open access

Required Healthcare Contributions, Fair Share Legislation, and RILA v. Fielder

Description: This report discusses the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA) preemption and examines the Fourth Circuit's decision in the context of the U.S. Supreme Court's past decisions on the subject. The report also considers the impact the decision could have on other attempts to enact fair share legislation
Date: April 24, 2007
Creator: Shimabukuro, Jon O.
open access

Progress Report for the grant "Hight-Resolution Mineralogical Charaterization and Biogeochemical Modeling of Uranium Reduction Pathways at the NABIR Field-Research Center"

Description: We have successfully completed a proof-of-concept, one-year grant on a three-year proposal from the former NABIR program. Using a state-of-the-art 300-kV, atomic resolution, Field Emission Gun Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), we have successfully identified three categories of mineral hosts for uranium in contaminated soils from the Oak Ridge FRC: (1) iron oxides: (2) mixed manganese-iron oxides; and (3) uranium phosphates.
Date: June 15, 2006
Creator: Veblen, David R.
open access

Numerical and Physical Modelling of Bubbly Flow Phenomena - Final Report to the Department of Energy

Description: This report describes the main features of the results obtained in the course of this project. A new approach to the systematic development of closure relations for the averaged equations of disperse multiphase flow is outlined. The focus of the project is on spatially non-uniform systems and several aspects in which such systems differ from uniform ones are described. Then, the procedure used in deriving the closure relations is given and some explicit results shown. The report also contains a list of publications supported by this grant and a list of the persons involved in the work.
Date: December 21, 2004
Creator: Prosperetti, Andrea
open access

Maryland Emergency Management and Homeland Security Statutory Authorities Summarized

Description: This report is one of a series that profiles the emergency management and homeland security statutory authorities of the 50 states, the District of Columbia, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, and three territories (American Samoa, Guam, and the U.S. Virgin Islands). Each profile identifies the more significant elements of state statutes, generally as codified. This report focuses on the state of Maryland.
Date: September 3, 2004
Creator: Bea, Keith; Runyon, L. Cheryl & Warnock, Kae M.
open access

Transport of Ions Across the Inner Envelope Membrane of Chloroplasts

Description: The technical report outlines the results of nine years of research on how ions cross the inner envelope membrane of chloroplasts. The ions include protons, nitrite, calcium and ferrous iron. Bicarbonate transport was also studied.
Date: June 2, 2004
Creator: McCarty, R. E.
open access

Photoinduced nucleation: a new technology for the detection of chemical contaminants. Final Report

Description: This research grant supported the creation and initial development of a new kind of chemical detector; one that can detect species at part per trillion levels because it does not rely on the direct measurement of a species presence; rather, it uses an indirect measurement of the effect of the trace species on the condensation nucleation of a supersaturated vapor. Since this nucleation process is extremely sensitive to the concentrations of certain types of impurities, this nucleation-based detection can be made more sensitive than any current spectroscopic detector.
Date: September 30, 2003
Creator: Katz, Joseph L.
open access

Final Technical Report, Outstanding Junior Investigator Award for De-fg02-94er40869

Description: This report summarizes the research of the Principal Investigator, his postdoctoral research associates, and his students during the period of the award. The majority of the work concerns the behavior of hadrons containing strange, charm, bottom and top quarks, with a particular focus on the extraction of Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa matrix elements from experiments performed on such systems.
Date: May 16, 2002
Creator: Falk, Adam F.
open access

Search for the microscopic origin of defects and shear localization in metallic glasses

Description: This proposed research addresses one of the long outstanding fundamental problems in materials science, the mechanisms of deformation in amorphous metals. Due to the lack of long-range translational order, details of structural defects and their behaviors in metallic glasses have not been accessible in experiments. In addition, the small dimensions of the amorphous alloys made early by rapid quenching impose severe limit on many standard mechanical and microscopy testing. As a result, the microscopic mechanism of deformation in the amorphous materials has not been established. The recent success in synthesis of bulk metallic glass overcomes the difficulty in standard testing; but the barrier for understanding the defect process and microscopic mechanisms of deformation still remains. Amorphous metals deform in a unique way by shear banding. As a result, there is no work hardening, little macroscopic plasticity, and catastrophic failure. To retain and improve the inherent high strength, large elastic strain, and high toughness in amorphous metals, a variety of synthesis activities are currently underway including making metallic glass matrix composites. These new explorations call for a quantitative understanding of deformation mechanisms in both the monolithic metallic glasses as well as their composites. The knowledge is expected to give insight and guide to design, processing and applications of this new generation of engineering materials. This DOE funded research takes the approach of computer simulation and modeling to tackle this problem. It is expected that with the increasing power of computers, the numerical modeling could provide the answers that are difficult or impossible to get from experiments. Three parallel research tasks were planned in this work. One is on search of atomic structural defects and other microscopic mechanisms underlying the deformation process. The second is the formulate a general model to describe shear localization, shear band formation and propagation on mesoscopic scale. …
Date: November 10, 2001
Creator: Li, Mo
open access

Rehabilitation of the South Jetty, Ocean City, Maryland

Description: Partial abstract: Frequent dredging requirements and scouring at the foundation of Ocean City Inlet's south jetty resulted in a study to determine the source of the shoaling and scouring. The study concluded that sand was being transported northward along Assateague Island, through and over the south jetty, and deposited inside the inlet. The sand was then transported north by ebb currents where it encroached on the Federal navigation channel. A rehabilitation program was initiated to create a littoral barrier to eliminate the shoaling problem and to repair the scour hold. Three headland breakwaters were constructed to stabilize Northern Assateague Island. The site was selected as part of the Monitoring Completed Coastal Projects (MCCP) Program to determine how well the rehabilitation project accomplished its design purpose.
Date: March 1994
Creator: Bass, Gregory P.; Fulford, Edward T.; Underwood, Steven G. & Parson, Larry E.
open access

Aerodynamic, structural, and trajectory analysis of ASTRID-1 vehicle

Description: The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory, JHU/API, in support of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL, is conducting aerodynamic, trajectory, and structural analysis of the Advanced Single Stage Technology Rapid Insertion Demonstration (ASTRID) vehicle, being launched out of Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in February 1994. The launch is designated ASTRID-1 and is the first in a series of three that will be launched out of VAFB. Launch dates for the next two flights have not been identified, but they are scheduled for the 1994-1995 time frame. The primary goal of the ASTRID-1 flight is to test the LLNL light weight thrust on demand bi-propellant pumped divert propulsion system. The system is employed as the main thrusters for the ASTRID-1 vehicle and uses hydrazine as the mono-propellant. The major conclusions are: (1) The vehicle is very stable throughout flight (stability margin = 17 to 24 inches); (2) The aerodynamic frequency and the roll rate are such that pitch-roll interactions will be small; (3) The high stability margin combined with the high launcher elevation angle makes the vehicle flight path highly sensitive to perturbations during the initial phase of flight, i.e., during the first second of flight after leaving the rail; (4) The major impact dispersions for the test flight are due to winds. The wind impact dispersions are 90% dictated by the low altitude, 0 to 1000 ft., wind conditions; and (5) In order to minimize wind dispersions, head wind conditions are favored for the launch as November VAFB mean tail winds result in land impacts. The ballistic wind methodology can be employed to assess the impact points of winds at the launch site.
Date: February 10, 1994
Creator: Glover, L. S.; Iwaskiw, A. P.; Oursler, M. A.; Perini, L. L. & Schaefer, E. D.
open access

STAR Electromagnetic Calorimeter R&D Progress Report, 1 October 1992--31 August 1993

Description: A lead-scintillator sampling electromagnetic calorimeter (EMC) is planned as an upgrade to the STAR detector for the RHIC Accelerator at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Considerable work on the conceptual design of the calorimeter, and related interfacing issues with the solenoids magnet and the time projection chamber (TPC) subsystems of STAR occurred in the period 1 October 1992 to 31 August 1993 (FY 1993). This report documents and summarizes the conclusions and progress from this work.
Date: October 1, 1993
open access

Studies of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Annual progress report, August 1, 1992--July 31, 1993

Description: With the completion of the experimental runs with the DLS, which included both heavy ion and nucleon projectiles and targets, is being completed the analysis of these high statistics experiments. The Hopkins group has a major responsibility in comparing the experimental results with recently developed simulation codes for a theoretical comparison. The second major activity involves the STAR experiment at RHIC, to continued involvement with simulations and development of prototypes of detector systems is expected. The program for studying optical properties of mirrors and gas scintillations related to Cerenkov ring imaging will continue.
Date: August 1, 1993
Creator: Madansky, L.
open access

Preliminary reentry safety assessment of the General Purpose Heat Source module for the Cassini mission: Aerospace Nuclear Safety Program

Description: As asked by the U. S. Department of Energy/Office of Special Applications, and in support of the Environmental Impact Statement for the Cassini mission, The Johns Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) has conducted preliminary one-dimensional ablation and thermal analyses of the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS). The predicted earth entry conditions provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for a Cassini Venus-Venus-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VVEJGA) trajectory were used as initial conditions. The results of this study which constitute the initial reentry analysis assessment leading to the Cassini Updated Safety, Analysis Report (USAR) are discussed in this document.
Date: April 1, 1993
Creator: Conn, D. W. & Brenza, P. T.
open access

Analysis of thermally-stable electron transport factors from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii

Description: The mechanisms by which hyperthermophilic archaebacteria grow and carry out metabolic functions at elevated temperatures have yet to be determined. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the metabolic characteristics of, and the electron transport enzymes involved in, hydrogen/sulfur transformation by hyperthermophilic archaebacteria. Efforts focus on the autotrophic H{sub 2}-oxidizing bacterium, Pyrodictium brockii which has an optimum growth temperature of 105{degrees}C. Biochemical and genetic characterization of enzymes involved in hydrogen oxidizing electron transport pathway. These including investigating the role of the membrane lipids in protecting the hydrogenase enzyme from thermal inactivation, characterization of a quinone and a c-type cytochrome, and analysis of the topology in the membrane in the net energy generating components are reported. The long-term goal is to understand some of the factors contributing to the biochemical basis of extreme thermophily.
Date: September 1, 1992
open access

Analysis of thermally-stable electron transport factors from the hyperthermophilic archaebacterium Pyrodictium brockii. Progress report

Description: The mechanisms by which hyperthermophilic archaebacteria grow and carry out metabolic functions at elevated temperatures have yet to be determined. The objective of this work is to develop an understanding of the metabolic characteristics of, and the electron transport enzymes involved in, hydrogen/sulfur transformation by hyperthermophilic archaebacteria. Efforts focus on the autotrophic H{sub 2}-oxidizing bacterium, Pyrodictium brockii which has an optimum growth temperature of 105{degrees}C. Biochemical and genetic characterization of enzymes involved in hydrogen oxidizing electron transport pathway. These including investigating the role of the membrane lipids in protecting the hydrogenase enzyme from thermal inactivation, characterization of a quinone and a c-type cytochrome, and analysis of the topology in the membrane in the net energy generating components are reported. The long-term goal is to understand some of the factors contributing to the biochemical basis of extreme thermophily.
Date: September 1, 1992
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