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Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1973
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Northeastern Region.

Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1971
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Plant Science Research Division.

Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1965
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Crops Research Division.

Muscadine Grapes: A Fruit for the South

Description: This bulletin discusses the cultivation of muscadine grapes in the southern United States. Topics discussed include propagation, pruning and training, soil management, fertilizers, harvesting, common diseases, and varieties.
Date: 1961
Creator: United States. Agricultural Research Service. Crops Research Division.

Muscadine Grapes

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Date: 1947
Creator: Dearing, Charles

Persian Clover

Description: This bulletin discusses the cultivation of Persian clover, a forage crop for both feed and green manure in the southern United States. Fertilizer requirements and seed production are among the topics discussed.
Date: 1943
Creator: Hollowell, E. A. (Eugene Amos)

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed and instructions for constructing a concrete vat are given.
Date: 1940
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.

The Wheat Jointworm and Its Control

Description: Revised edition. "The wheat jointworm is a very small grub which lives in stems of wheat, feeding on the juices of the plant and causing a slight swelling or distortion of the stem above the joint. The egg from which it hatches is laid in the stem by an insect resembling a small black ant with wings. This insect attacks wheat only. The injury which it causes to wheat is very distinct from that caused by the Hessian fly, yet the effects caused by these two insects are often confused by farmers." -- p. 1-2. This bulletin gives a brief outline of the life cycle and the nature of the injury to the plant by the jointworm so that any farmer may readily recognize its work and be able to apply the measures of control herein recommended.
Date: 1940
Creator: Phillips, W. J. (William Jeter), 1879-1972 & Poos, F. W.

Saving Soil with Sod in the Ohio Valley Region

Description: Clearing of forests, overgrazing, and soil erosion have greatly depleted the soil of the Ohio Valley in the United States. Farmers should implement agricultural practices that encourage the growth of sod, which has the potential to restore the soil. "The use of grass in increasing the productivity of farm land, in conserving soil on pasture and cropland, and in protecting smaller eroded or erodible areas is discussed in this bulletin." -- p. i
Date: 1939
Creator: Welton, Kenneth

Soil Defense in the South

Description: "This bulletin describes farming practices that conserve soil, and how such practices may be applied to farms in a large part of the South. Its scope is limited to that part of the Cotton Belt extending west from the Georgia-Alabama line to central Texas and southern Oklahoma." -- p. i.
Date: 1938
Creator: Rowalt, E. M.

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.

Home Gardening in the South

Description: Revised edition. "A well-kept vegetable is a source not only of profit to the gardener but of pleasure to the entire family. For many vegetables which deteriorate rapidly in quality after being gathered, the only practicable means of securing the best is to grow them at home. This is especially true of garden peas, sweet corn, string beans, green Lima beans, and asparagus. The land utilized for, the farm garden, if well cared for, yields much larger returns than any area of similar size planted to the usual farm crops. A half-acre garden should produce as much in money value as 2 or 3 acres in general farm crops. In most sections of the South, though vegetables can be grown in nearly every month of the year, the garden is neglected; in fact, no feature of southern agriculture is more neglected than the production of vegetables for home use. In the following pages specific instructions are given for making a garden and caring for it throughout the season." -- p. 2
Date: 1931
Creator: Thompson, H. C. (Homer Columbus), b. 1885

Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

Handling and Loading Southern New Potatoes

Description: Revised edition. This bulletin discusses methods for handling, loading, and transporting southern new potatoes in the United States. It explains the importance of grading potatoes, removing bruised and diseased potatoes from the crop before transport, and loading cars properly. Potatoes may be loaded into cars in barrels, sacks, and crates, but hampers should not be used.
Date: 1927
Creator: Grimes, A. M.

The Mexican Bean Beetle in the East

Description: Report discussing the Mexican bean beetle, which is the most serious insect enemy of beans in parts of the United States. Although it has long been present in the southwestern United States, it has recently spread to the Southeast and destroyed much of the bean crop there. This bulletin describes the beetle's life cycle and different control measures, including spraying and dusting with insecticides.
Date: 1924
Creator: Howard, Neale F.

Beekeeping in the Tulip-Tree Region

Description: "Many thousand colonies of bees occur in the region where the tulip-tree is abundant but the honey crop from tulip-tree flowers inconsiderable. Too few beekeepers in this region have modern equipment, it is true, but the greatest loss comes from the fact that they do not care for their bees so as to have them ready to gather the abundant nectar from this early-blooming tree. In this bulletin a methods is given for the management of the apiary so that the full honey crop from this source may be obtained." -- p. 2
Date: 1922
Creator: Phillips, Everett Franklin, 1878-1951 & Demuth, Geo. S. (George S.)

Diseases of Watermelons

Description: This bulletin discusses diseases which commonly afflict watermelons, including wilt, root-knot, gummy stem blight, ground-rot, anthracnose, stem-end rot, and diseases which primarily develop during transport to markets. Disease control measures are also discussed.
Date: 1922
Creator: Orton, W. A. (William Allen), 1877-1930 & Meier, F. C.

The Southern Pine Beetle: A Menace to the Pine Timber of the Southern States

Description: Report discussing the destructive effects of the Southern pine beetle on pine forests in the southern United States. To prevent spread of the disease, infested trees should be located between November and March and destroyed. Methods for locating infested trees and destroying them are explained in detail.
Date: 1921
Creator: Hopkins, A. D. (Andrew Delmar), 1857-1948

Wheat Scab and Its Control

Description: This bulletin discusses wheat scab, a fungal disease of wheat, rye, barley, and oats that is caused by a parasite. It describes the appearance of afflicted crops as well as the parasite's life cycle and proposes a variety of control measures.
Date: 1921
Creator: Johnson, Aaron G. & Dickson, James G. (James Geere), b. 1891