UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 1,884 Matching Results

Search Results

Care of Food in the Home

Description: Report discussing the proper methods of handling and preserving food. Topics discussed include mold, flies, dust, pet hair and dander, cold storage techniques, and disinfectants. Includes an index.
Date: 1910
Creator: Abel, Mary Hinman, 1850-1938

Growing Grain on Southern Idaho Dry Farms

Description: "In this bulletin a brief description of the climate and soils of southern Idaho is given. The equipment of the dry farm is then discussed, followed by directions for growing the principal grain crops and recommendations as to the best varieties to grow." -- title page
Date: 1916
Creator: Aicher, L. C.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

Eradicating Tall Larkspur on Cattle Ranges in the National Forests

Description: "Poisoning by tall larkspur causes heavy losses of cattle in the National Forests each year. During the last three years 5,500 head of cattle were lost annually. The most effective way to prevent this loss is to grub out the plants, a method of eradication which gives permanent results; other expedients are likely to be temporary.... Results of grubbing work in National Forest ranges, together with the methods of operation, the tools to use, the best time to do the work, and the best way to dispose of the grubbed plants, are given in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1917
Creator: Aldous, A. E. (Alfred Evan), 1886-1938

Ponds for Wildlife

Description: "The first purpose of this bulletin is to show how farmers and ranchers may protect their ponds from sedimentation, soil erosion, and water loss through the use of vegetation suitable as food and shelter for wildlife; the second is to give some information on the management of wildlife in farm ponds. Unless otherwise stated, the information contained in this bulletin pertains to the water area, or pond proper, and the pond area, or the land immediately adjacent to the pond and ordinarily contained within a fence." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Allan, Philip Farley, 1909- & Davis, Cecil N.

The Feeding of Farm Animals

Description: Report discussing the general principles of the feeding of farm animals based on experiments and investigations as well as the observations of successful animal feeders. The discussion includes suggested rations for various animals and purposes.
Date: 1895
Creator: Allen, E. W. (Edward W.)

The Feeding of Farm Animals

Description: Report discussing the general principles of the feeding of farm animals based on experiments and investigations as well as the observations of successful animal feeders. The discussion includes suggested rations for various animals and purposes.
Date: 1897
Creator: Allen, E. W. (Edward W.)

The Turnip Aphid in the Southern States and Methods for Its Control

Description: "The turnip aphid is one of the most destructive and widely distributed pests of turnip, mustard, radish, and related crops in the United States. It causes heavy losses to growers of these crops every year, especially in the Southern States. Dust mixtures containing derris, cube, or nicotine, and sprays containing derris or cube, will control the turnip aphid when applied properly. The first application of insecticides should be made when the plants are very small, and additional applications should be made at intervals of 7 to 14 days up to the time of harvest. To provide for effective application of insecticides, the seed of susceptible crops should be planted in drills, with the rows spaced uniformly apart. The following cultural practices aid in the successful production of crops exposed to turnip aphid attack: (1) A well-prepared, fertile seedbed to produce thrifty and rapidly growing plants, (2) planting the seed in drills to permit cultivation, (3) harvesting early to shorten the period of exposure to infestation, (4) destroying crop remnants to eliminate a common sources of infestation to succeeding crops, and (5) applying a nitrogenous fertilizer to stimulate plant growth." -- p. ii
Date: 1941
Creator: Allen, Norman, 1900- & Harrison, P. K. (Perry Kips), b. 1891

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields in Kentucky and Tennessee

Description: "In the limestone and mountain districts south of the Ohio River there is much land that has been run down by continual cropping without rotation. In some places run-down land is left to grow up in weeds, wild grasses, and brush, a practice known as 'resting' the land. Where this sort of farm management is followed farm manure is largely wasted, little or no attention is paid to green-manure crops or other means of putting humus into the soil, and crop yields are very low. However, progressive farmers throughout the region who have built up run-down lands are now getting heavy yields. In the following pages are described some of the methods by which these farmers get results by making good use of farm manure and crop refuse, using legumes and grasses in regular rotations, and applying lime and commercial fertilizers." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921

How a City Family Managed a Farm

Description: "This bulletin is a record of the experience of a city family that moved onto a farm in 1892. The father had been a lawyer by profession, the manager for a well-established business firm in one of the principal cities of the Middle West, and was earning a salary of $3,000 a year. At 60 years of age, having been in business about twenty-five years, he was compelled on account of ill health to abandon his profession and business.... The family decided to buy a farm and attempt to solve the problem confronting them, namely, 'to make a living, educate the children, and make a pleasant home.' This paper will how they satisfactorily solved the problem.... An attempt will be made to present such facts about this farm as will enable the reader to comprehend under what conditions and by what means the results were accomplished; hence, a description of the farm and the methods of operating it will be given in some detail." -- p. 5
Date: 1911
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921

How Live Stock Is Handled in the Bluegrass Region of Kentucky

Description: "The object of this bulletin is to show how livestock is handled and fits into the farm organization in the bluegrass region of Kentucky. The average successful farm of any long-established type will have various kinds of livestock distributed in about the proportion that owners or operators in general believe will pay best. Thus, a gradual process of selection is going on constantly in all agricultural regions, and it should be to the farmer's interest to know the best practice in his community and to have explained the economic advantages that have been secured by such practice. In this bulletin an effort has been made to bring out the fundamental practices that make for success with livestock in central Kentucky as determined by the practices of the more successful livestock farmers of that region." -- p. 3
Date: 1917
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921

Ways of Making Southern Mountain Farms More Productive

Description: "The southern mountain farm often produces no more than a scant living for the family. Corn is the chief crop grown. Often part of the farm lies idle, being 'rested' while corn is grown on another part year after year until the land is worn out. By growing three or more crops in rotation, including clover, the farmer will be able to produce larger crops, make more money, and keep all crop land under cultivation all the time. Cattle, hogs, and sheep will not only add to the cash income, but will help to increase the fertility of the soil, and render larger crops possible. This bulletin describes crop rotations for small mountain farms in the southern Alleghenies, and gives complete directions for starting a crop rotation that will make poor mountain land more productive." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921