UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 90 Matching Results

Search Results

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. This bulletin gives the life history of the insect, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it. There are two generations in a season, so greater vigilance is necessary. The second generation passes the winter only in the corn roots, so if these are destroyed or plowed under deeply, the pest will be largely decreased. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the pest." -- p. 2
Date: 1919
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

The Larger Corn Stalk-Borer

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses a pale, dark-spotted caterpillar known as the larger cornstalk-borer which bores into and weakens cornstalks. "Only corn is injured seriously by this insect; some of the larger grasses are food plants, and sugar cane sometimes is damaged slightly. There are two generations in a season. As the second generation passes the winter in the corn roots, if the roots are destroyed or plowed, the pest will be largely subdued. The injury is worst where corn follows corn, so rotation of crops will help to destroy the borer. This bulletin gives the life history of the borer, its feeding habits, and methods of combating it." -- p. ii
Date: 1933
Creator: Ainslie, George G.

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields in Kentucky and Tennessee

Description: "In the limestone and mountain districts south of the Ohio River there is much land that has been run down by continual cropping without rotation. In some places run-down land is left to grow up in weeds, wild grasses, and brush, a practice known as 'resting' the land. Where this sort of farm management is followed farm manure is largely wasted, little or no attention is paid to green-manure crops or other means of putting humus into the soil, and crop yields are very low. However, progressive farmers throughout the region who have built up run-down lands are now getting heavy yields. In the following pages are described some of the methods by which these farmers get results by making good use of farm manure and crop refuse, using legumes and grasses in regular rotations, and applying lime and commercial fertilizers." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921

Ways of Making Southern Mountain Farms More Productive

Description: "The southern mountain farm often produces no more than a scant living for the family. Corn is the chief crop grown. Often part of the farm lies idle, being 'rested' while corn is grown on another part year after year until the land is worn out. By growing three or more crops in rotation, including clover, the farmer will be able to produce larger crops, make more money, and keep all crop land under cultivation all the time. Cattle, hogs, and sheep will not only add to the cash income, but will help to increase the fertility of the soil, and render larger crops possible. This bulletin describes crop rotations for small mountain farms in the southern Alleghenies, and gives complete directions for starting a crop rotation that will make poor mountain land more productive." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Arnold, J. H. (Jacob Hiram), 1864-1921

Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1916
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972

Common Birds of Southeastern United States in Relation to Agriculture

Description: Revised edition. This report discusses birds commonly found in the southeastern United States with special regard to their diets and the impact these birds have on agriculture and insects in this region.
Date: 1918
Creator: Beal, F. E. L. (Foster Ellenborough Lascelles), 1840-1916; McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962 & Kalmbach, E. R. (Edwin Richard), 1884-1972

Farm Practice in the Use of Commercial Fertilizers in the South Atlantic States

Description: Report discussing the use of fertilizers on the more important soils of the South Atlantic States in the growing of staple farm crops. Factors which influence the use of commercial fertilizers such as crop rotation, legumes, and manure are discussed. In addition, methods for fertilizing cotton, corn, oats, wheat, and cowpea are discussed.
Date: 1910
Creator: Beavers, J. C.

The Roundheaded Apple-Tree Borer

Description: This report discusses the roundheaded apple-tree borer, an insect in the eastern and midwestern United States that, in its larval stage, destroys the bark and wood of apple trees. Several methods of control are discussed, including worming, paints and washes, and sprays.Apple-tree borers.
Date: 1915
Creator: Brooks, Fred E.

Hog Pastures for the Southern States

Description: This bulletin describes how farmers in the southern United States can cultivate pastures for hogs using forage crops. Among the crops recommended are corn, sorghum, winter grains, alfalfa, several varieties of clover and beans, cowpeas, peanuts, chufas, sweet potatoes, mangels, and rape.
Date: 1918
Creator: Carrier, Lyman & Ashbrook, F. G. (Frank Getz), 1892-

Eradication of Ferns from Pasture Lands in the Eastern United States

Description: "There are nearly 7,500 recognized species of ferns in the world, of which number over 200 are known to be native to the United States. A few species have become weed pests in this country, and it is to a discussion of the control of these weedy ferns that this bulletin is devoted. The parts of the United States in which ferns are bad weeds are, principally, (1) the hill country of the Northeastern States and the higher portions of the Appalachian Mountain region as far south as Georgia, and (2) the Pacific coast country west of the Cascade Mountains.... This publication deals only with fern eradication in the Eastern States." -- p. 1-2
Date: 1915
Creator: Cox, H. R. (Herbert Randolph)

Farm Practices That Increase Crop Yields: The Gulf Coast Region

Description: "Gulf Coast region upland soils are ordinarily deficient in nitrogen and need to be supplied with liberal quantities of organic matter if profitable crop yields are to be produced. This condition is most easily and cheaply remedied by growing such legumes as velvet beans, cowpeas, soy beans, bur clover, crimson clover, hairy vetch, and beggar weed, and by carefully utilizing all farm manures, crop residues, and other sources of humus. By a simple readjustment most of the cropping systems followed in this region may be made to include one or more legumes which will increase the supply of nitrogen and humus in the soil and greatly increase crop yields. Systems by means of which crop yields are being increased in the region are discussed in the following pages." -- p. 2
Date: 1918
Creator: Crosby, M. A.

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1933
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1948
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1958
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1961
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1963
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1966
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1919
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Strawberry Culture: South Atlantic and Gulf Coast Regions

Description: Revised edition. Report discussing best practices for the cultivation of strawberries in the South Atlantic and Gulf Coast regions of the United States. Topics discussed include varieties, soil preparation, mulch and fertilizers, irrigation, harvesting, and diseases and insect enemies.
Date: 1928
Creator: Darrow, George M. (George McMillan), 1889-

Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles

Muscadine Grapes

Description: Revised edition. "Muscadine grapes, which are native to the southeastern part of the United States, thrive in most soils of that region. They can be grown successfully in the Southeastern States, where American bunch grapes do not thrive. furthermore, they are suitable for home gardens as well as for commercial use. In fact they are perhaps the most satisfactory of all fruits for the home garden in this region. They cannot be grown, hoever, where temperatures as low as 0 °F occur habitually and may be injured at somewhat higher temperatures. Muscadine grapes are relatively uninjured by diseases and insects and produce well with a minimum of care, but they resopnd favorably to the good cultural practices recommended in this bulletin. The varieties described or listed produce fruit suitable for making unfermented juice, wine, jelly, and other culinary products and for eating fresh over a long season." -- p. ii
Date: 1947
Creator: Dearing, Charles

Marketing Live Stock in the South: Suggestions for Improvement

Description: "The purpose of this bulletin is to place before southern farmers [in the United States] who produce stock in small lots and who are experiencing difficulty in marketing their livestock the more important local marketing plans which have been found successful in certain communities and which are practicable under southern conditions." -- p. 3. Topics include cooperative livestock shipping, marketing clubs and associations, and market demands.
Date: 1917
Creator: Doty, S. W.

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1919
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.

Cattle-Fever Ticks and Methods of Eradication

Description: This bulletin discusses the cattle-fever tick and methods for controlling it. Possible methods include dipping, pasture rotation, and arsenical dips. The life history of the tick is also discussed.
Date: 1920
Creator: Ellenberger, W. P. & Chapin, Robert M.