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A Multipactoring Analysis of the Accelerating Cavity for RHIC
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Cancellation of the Chromatic Effects with proper Field Profile
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CW Mode of Operation of a Proton FFAG Accelerator
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Feasibility Study of a 1.5-GeV Proton FFAG in the AGS Tunnel
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FFAG Accelerator Proton Driver for Neutrino Factory
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Generalization of the ERIT Principle and Method
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Revision of the Adjusted Field Profile Estimate Criterion
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A Super-Conducting Linac as a new Injector to the BNL-AGS
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Tracking of Acceleration with HNJ Method
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CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005
Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.
Analysis and Design of Cold Helium Gas Warm Up for the 2K Experiment
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Comparison of the present and planned operation of the SIS18 and the AGS Booster with intermediate charge state heavy ions
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Local shielding requirements for the STAR detector
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Summary of the LARP Mini-Workshop on Electron Lens Simulations at BNL
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ELSHIM: Program to Simulate Elastic Processes of Heavy Ions
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Energy Recovery Linac: High Power RF Systems
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The RHIC polarized source upgrade
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The RHIC polarized source upgrade
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RF and structural characterization of new SRF films
In the past years, energetic vacuum deposition methods have been developed in different laboratories to improve Nb/Cu technology for superconducting cavities. Jefferson Lab is pursuing energetic condensation deposition via Electron Cyclotron Resonance. As part of this study, the influence of the deposition energy on the material and RF properties of the Nb thin film is investigated. The film surface and structure analyses are conducted with various techniques like X-ray diffraction, Transmission Electron Microscopy, Auger Electron Spectroscopy and RHEED. The microwave properties of the films are characterized on 50 mm disk samples with a 7.5 GHz surface impedance characterization system. This paper presents surface impedance measurements in correlation with surface and material characterization for Nb films produced on copper substrates with different bias voltages and also highlights emerging opportunities for developing multilayer SRF films with a new deposition system.
Astrophysical Gyrokinetics: Kinetic and Fluid Turbulent Cascades In Magentized Weakly Collisional Plasmas
This paper presents a theoretical framework for understanding plasma turbulence in astrophysical plasmas. It is motivated by observations of electromagnetic and density fluctuations in the solar wind, interstellar medium and galaxy clusters, as well as by models of particle heating in accretion disks. All of these plasmas and many others have turbulentmotions at weakly collisional and collisionless scales. The paper focuses on turbulence in a strong mean magnetic field. The key assumptions are that the turbulent fluctuations are small compared to the mean field, spatially anisotropic with respect to it and that their frequency is low compared to the ion cyclotron frequency. The turbulence is assumed to be forced at some system-specific outer scale. The energy injected at this scale has to be dissipated into heat, which ultimately cannot be accomplished without collisions. A kinetic cascade develops that brings the energy to collisional scales both in space and velocity. The nature of the kinetic cascade in various scale ranges depends on the physics of plasma fluctuations that exist there. There are four special scales that separate physically distinct regimes: the electron and ion gyroscales, the mean free path and the electron diffusion scale. In each of the scale ranges separated by these scales, the fully kinetic problem is systematically reduced to a more physically transparent and computationally tractable system of equations, which are derived in a rigorous way. In the "inertial range" above the ion gyroscale, the kinetic cascade separates into two parts: a cascade of Alfvenic fluctuations and a passive cascade of density and magnetic-fieldstrength fluctuations. The former are governed by the Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic (RMHD) equations at both the collisional and collisionless scales; the latter obey a linear kinetic equation along the (moving) field lines associated with the Alfvenic component (in the collisional limit, these compressive fluctuations become the ...
Pump Side-scattering in Ultra-powerful Backward Raman Amplifiers
Extremely large laser power might be obtained by compressing laser pulses through backward Raman amplification (BRA) in plasmas. Premature Raman backscattering of a laser pump by plasma noise might be suppressed by an appropriate detuning of the Raman resonance, even as the desired amplification of the seed persists with a high efficiency. In this paper, we analyze side-scattering of laser pumps by plasma noise in backward Raman amplifiers. Though its growth rate is smaller than that of backscattering, the side-scattering can nevertheless be dangerous, because of a longer path of side-scattered pulses in plasmas and because of an angular dependence of the Raman resonance detuning. We show that side-scattering of laser pumps by plasma noise in BRA might be suppressed to a tolerable level at all angles by an appropriate combination of two detuning mechanisms associated with plasma density gradient and pump chirp.
EVALUATION OF THE EFFECT OF FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND MOVEMENT OF MOISTURE IN THE UNSATURATED ZONE AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA
No Description Available.
Systematics of Fission-Product Yields
No abstract prepared.
FINAL REPORT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS TECHNOLOGY PHASE II ANIMAS VALLEY, NEW MEXICO
Final Technical Report covering siting, permitting, and drilling two geothermal temperature gradient holes. This report provides a summary of geotechnical and geophysical data that led to the siting, drilling, and completion of 2 temperature gradient holes in the geothermal anomaly at Lightning Dock Known Geothermal Resource Area in the Animas Valley of New Mexico. Included in this report is a summary of institutional factors and data defining the well drilling process and acquiring drilling permits. Data covering the results of the drilling and temperature logging of these two holes are provided. The two gradient holes were sited on federal geothermal leases owned by Lightning Dock Geothermal, Inc. and both holes were drilled into lakebed sediments some distance from the intense shallow geothermal anomaly located in the eastern half of Section 7, Township 25 South, Range 19 West.
Confinement of airborne radioactivity. Final progress report, January-December 1978
A new test method has been developed at the Savannah River Laboratory for evaluating the iodine retention capabilities of carbon used in the airborne-activity confinement system. Methyl iodide tagged with I-131 is injected into a test gas stream continuously for 5 hours with test conditions of 80/sup 0/C temperature, 95% relative humidity, and 55 feet per minute linear flow velocity. Results show that the CH/sub 3/I retention efficiency is independent of the inlet CH/sub 3/I concentration over the range of at least 0.9 to 200 ..mu..g/m/sup 3/ in the test gas stream. The method was also used to evaluate the effects of paint fumes on in-service carbons and showed that solvent exposure reduced carbon service life by 5 to 7 months. Experimental carbons both before and after service exposure in the SRP carbon test facility were also evaluated.
Prediction of atmospheric δ13CO2 using fossil plant tissues. Reviews of Geophysics, 46/2006RG0002.(view/download pdf)
To summarize the content: we presented the results of laboratory experiments designed to quantify the relationship between plant tissue δ13C and δ13CO2 values under varying environmental conditions, including differential pCO2 ranging from 1 to 3 times today’s levels. As predicted, plants grown under elevated pCO2 showed increased average biomass compared to controls grown at the same temperature. Across a very large range in δ13Ca (≈ 24 ‰) and pCO2 (≈ 740 ppmv) we observed a consistent correlation between δ13Ca and δ13Cp (p<0.001). We show an average isotopic depletion of −25.4 ‰ for above-ground tissue and −23.2 ‰ for below-ground tissue of Raphanus sativus L. relative to the composition of the atmosphere under which it formed. For both above- and below-ground tissue, grown at both ~23 ˚C and ~29 ˚C, correlation was strong and significant (r2 ≥ 0.98, p<0.001); variation in pCO2 level had little or no effect on this relationship.
Impact of the LHC beam abort kicker prefire on high luminosity insertion and CMS detector performance
The effect of possible accidental beam loss in LHC on the IP5 insertion elements and CMS detector is studied via realistic Monte Carlo simulations. Such beam loss could be the consequence of an unsynchronized abort or � in worst case � an accidental prefire of one of the abort kicker modules. Simulations with the STRUCT code show that this beam losses would take place in the IP5 inner and outer triplets. MARS simulations of the hadronic and electro-magnetic cascades induced in such an event indicate severe heating of the inner triplet quadrupoles. In order to protect the IP5 elements, two methods are proposed: a set of shadow collimators in the outer triplet and a prefired module compensation using a special module charged with an opposite voltage (antikicker). The remnants of the accidental beam loss entering the experimental hall have been used as input for FLUKA simulations in the CMS detector. It is shown that it is vital to take measures to reliably protect the expensive CMS tracker components.
On possible use of bent crystal to improve Tevatron beam scraping
A possibility to improve the Tevatron beam halo scraping using a bent channeling crystal instead of a thin scattering primary collimator is studied. To evaluate the efficiency of the system, realistic simulations have been performed using the CATCH and STRUCT Monte Carlo codes. It is shown that the scraping efficiency can be increased and the accelerator-related backgrounds in the CDF and DØ collider detectors can be reduced by about one order of magnitude. Results on scraping efficiency versus thickness of amorphous layer of the crystal, crystal alignment and its length are presented.
Radiation environment resulting from Main Injector beam extraction to the NuMI beam line
A 120 GeV Main Injector proton beam will be delivered to the NuMI beam line at Fermilab at the rate of 3.7x 10{sup 20} per year. Realistic Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to examine the radiation environment in the beam extraction system and NuMI beam line elements. A complete 3-D model of the 160 meter extraction region has been implemented utilizing the computer code MARS. The model includes a description of the field of the electrostatic septa and POISSON calculated field maps of the Lambertson magnets and the other lattice components in the area. The beam element alignment and the source term have been simulated using the code STRUCT. Results on beam losses in the system, energy deposition in the core elements and residual dose rates on the components are presented.
Simulation of Alpha-Channeling in Mirror Machines
Applying α-channeling techniques to mirror machines can significantly increase their effective reactivity, thus making open configurations more advantageous for practical fusion. A large fraction of α particle energy can be extracted using rf waves. Effects employed to cool α particles can also in principle be used to heat the fusion ions; the possibility to design a configuration of rf waves which could be used to perform both tasks is demonstrated.
ORGDP Container Test and Development Program Fire Tests of UF6-Filled Cylinders
Fire tests of bare, UF{sub 6}-filled shipping cylinders were conducted at the ORGDP Rifle Range during October 1965 as part of the AEC-ORO Container Test and Development Program presently under way at the ORGDP. The multi purpose effort was to determine if the cylinders would hydrostatically or explosively rupture; the time available for fire fighting before either incident occurred; and the degree of contamination as related to the type of UF{sub 6} release, wind velocity, and terrain. In addition to the cylinder fire tests, other tests were made for further evaluation of the fire-resistant BOX foam plastic. These included a newly designed shipping drum for 5-in.-diam cylinders, and 15B-type wood shipping boxes for small containers. In one case, the latter contained a UF{sub 6}-filled Harshaw cylinder. The test times ranged from 45 to 95 min. In no instance did temperatures exceed 200 F These tests are discussed under Part B. Our Nuclear Engineering Department was responsible for site preparation and the test program. The Safety and Health Physics Departments Mr. A. F. Becher, head, provided primary assistance in the conductance of the tests and was additionally responsible for the environmental monitoring and sampling. Personnel of the Plant Shift Operations and Security, Fabrication and Maintenance, and Technical Divisions provided further support in the various operations. Mr. J. E. Wescott of the AEC-ORO and Mr. J. W. Edwards, ORGDP, were in charge of the motion and still photography. Two each of the following types of cylinders were tested: 3.5 in. diam x 7.5 in. Monel Harshaw, 5.0 in, diam x 30 in. Monel, and 8 in. diam x 48 in. nickel. Fill limits were 5, 55, and 250 lb of UF{sub 6} respectively, at an enrichment level of 0.22%. The larger cylinders were tested individually, with and without their metal valve covers. ...
Diagnostics for the Biased Electrode Experiment on NSTX
A linear array of four small biased electrodes was installed in NSTX in an attempt to control the width of the scrape-off layer (SOL) by creating a strong local poloidal electric field. The set of electrodes were separated poloidally by a 1 cm gap between electrodes and were located slightly below the midplane of NSTX, 1 cm behind the RF antenna and oriented so that each electrode is facing approximately normal to the magnetic field. Each electrode can be independently biased to ±100 volts. Present power supplies limit the current on two electrodes to 30 amps the other two to 10 amps each. The effect of local biasing was measured with a set of Langmuir probes placed between the electrodes and another set extending radially outward from the electrodes, and also by the gas puff imaging diagnostic (GPI) located 1 m away along the magnetic field lines intersecting the electrodes. Two fast cameras were also aimed directly at the electrode array. The hardware and controls of the biasing experiment will be presented and the initial effects on local plasma parameters will be discussed.
A Rosetta Stone Relating Conventions In Photo-Meson Partial Wave Analyses
A new generation of complete experiments in pseudoscalar meson photo-production is being pursued at several laboratories. While new data are emerging, there is some confusion regarding definitions of asymmetries and the conventions used in partial wave analyses (PWA). We present expressions for constructing asymmetries as coordinate-system independent ratios of cross sections, along with the names used for these ratios by different PWA groups.
HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF CONCRETE: YUCCA MOUNTAIN REPOSITORY ANALOGUES
No Description Available.
Advanced Emissions Control Development Program
The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).
Nonforward parton distributions
Applications of perturbative QCD to deeply virtual Compton scattering and hard exclusive electroproduction processes require a generalization of usual parton distributions for the case when long-distance information is accumulated in nonforward matrix elements &lt;p{prime}{vert_bar}O(0,x){vert_bar}p&gt; of quark and gluon light-cone operators. They describe two types of nonperturbative functions parameterizing such matrix elements: double distributions F(x,y;t) and nonforward distribution functions F{_}/zeta (X;t), discuss their spectral properties, evolution equations which they satisfy, basic uses and general aspects of factorization for hard exclusive processes.
F(1) for B (forward) D*ln from lattice QCD
The authors would like to determine |V{sub cb}| from the exclusive semi-leptonic decay B{yields}D*lv. The differential decay rate is d{Lambda}/dw = G{sub F}{sup 2}/4{pi}{sup 3}(w{sup 2}-1){sup 1/2}m{sub D*}{sup 3} (m{sub B}-m{sub D*}){sup 2}G(w)|V{sub cb}|{sup 2}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(w)|{sup 2}, where w = v {center_dot} v{prime} and G(1) = 1. At zero recoil (w = 1) heavy-quark symmetry requires F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) to be close to 1. So, |V{sub cb}| is determined by dividing measurements of d{Lambda}/dw by the phase space and well-known factors, and extrapolating to w {yields} 1. This yields |V{sub cb}|F{sub B{yields}D*}(1), and F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) is taken from ''theory''. To date models [1] or a combination of a rigorous inequality plus judgement [2] have been used to estimate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) - 1. In this work [3] they calculate F{sub B{yields}D*}(1) with lattice gauge theory, in the so-called quenched approximation, but the uncertainty from quenching is included in the error budget.
Onset and Saturation of Ion Heating by Odd-parity Rotating-magnetic-fields in a Field-reversed Configuration
Heating of figure-8 ions by odd-parity rotating magnetic fields (RMFο) applied to an elongated field-reversed configuration (FRC) is investigated. The largest energy gain occurs at resonances (s ≡ ω(sub)R⁄ω) of the RMFο frequency, ω(sub)R, with the figure-8 orbital frequency, ω, and is proportional to s^2 for s – even resonances and to s for s – odd resonances. The threshold for the transition from regular to stochastic orbits explains both the onset and saturation of heating. The FRC magnetic geometry lowers the threshold for heating below that in the tokamak by an order of magnitude.
Effects of the Thickness of Niobium Surface Oxide Layers on Field Emission
Field emission on the inner surfaces of niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities is still one of the major obstacles for reaching high accelerating gradients for SRF community. Our previous experimental results* seemed to imply that the threshold of field emission was related to the thickness of Nb surface oxide layers. In this contribution, a more detailed study on the influences of the surface oxide layers on the field emission on Nb surfaces will be reported. By anodization technique, the thickness of the surface pentoxide layer was artificially fabricated from 3 nm up to 460 nm. A home-made scanning field emission microscope was employed to perform the scans on the surfaces. Emitters were characterized using a scanning electron microscope together with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer. The SFEM experimental results were analyzed in terms of surface morphology and oxide thickness of Nb samples and chemical composition and geographic shape of the emitters. A model based on the classic electromagnetic theory was developed trying to understand the experimental results. Possibly implications for Nb SRF cavity applications from this study will be discussed.
Fastest Electropolishing Technique on Niobium for Particle Accelerators
Field emission on the inner surfaces of niobium (Nb) superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities is still one of the major obstacles for reaching high accelerating gradients for SRF community. Our previous experimental results [1] seemed to imply that the threshold of field emission was related to the thickness of Nb surface oxide layers. In this contribution, a more detailed study on the influences of the surface oxide layers on the field emission on Nb surfaces will be reported. By anodization technique, the thickness of the surface pentoxide layer was artificially fabricated from 3nm up to 460nm. A home-made scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was employed to perform the scans on the surfaces. Emitters were characterized using a scanning electron microscope together with an energy dispersive x-ray analyzer. The experimental results could be understood by a simple model calculation based on classic electromagnetic theory as shown in Ref.1. Possibly implications for Nb SRF cavity applications from this study will be discussed.
Progress of Bep Treatments on Nb at JLAB
Recent experimental results have indicated that Buffered Electropolishing (BEP) is a promising candidate for the next generation of surface treatment technique for Nb superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities to be used in particle accelerators. In order to lay the foundation for using BEP as the next generation surface treatment technique for Nb SRF cavities, some fundamental aspects of BEP treatments for Nb have to be investigated. In this report, recent progress on BEP study at JLab is shown. Improvements on the existing vertical BEP are made to allow water cooling from outside of a Nb single cell cavity in addition to cooling provided by acid circulation so that the temperature of the cavity can be stable during processing. Some investigation on the electrolyte mixture was performed to check the aging effect of the electrolyte. It is shown that good polishing results can still be obtained on Nb at a current density of 171 mA/cm when the BEP electrolyte was at the stationary condition and was more than 1.5 years old.
Using GIS to Identify Remediation Areas in Landfills
This paper reports the use of GIS mapping software—ArcMap and ArcInfo Workstation—by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) as a non-intrusive method of locating and characterizing radioactive waste in a 97-acre landfill to aid in planning cleanup efforts. The fine-scale techniques and methods used offer potential application for other burial sites for which hazards indicate a non-intrusive approach. By converting many boxes of paper shipping records in multiple formats into a relational database linked to spatial data, the INEEL has related the paper history to our current GIS technologies and spatial data layers. The wide breadth of GIS techniques and tools quickly display areas in need of remediation as well as evaluate methods of remediation for specific areas as the site characterization is better understood and early assumptions are refined.
STATISTICAL MODELING SUPPORT FOR CALIBRATION OF A
Nuclear reactor system analyses rely on multiple c
Images of Quark Intrinsic Motion in Covariant Parton Model
We discuss the relations between TMDs and PDFs in the framework of the covariant parton model. The quark OAM and its connection to TMDs are studied as well.
MODELING FLOW AND TRANSPORT PATHWAYS TO THE POTENTIAL REPOSITORY HORIZON AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN
The isotopic ratios of {sup 36}Cl/Cl are used in conjunction with geologic interpretation and numerical modeling to evaluate flow and transport pathways, processes, and model parameters in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain. By synthesizing geochemical and geologic data, the numerical model results provide insight into the validity of alternative hydrologic parameter sets, flow and transport processes in and away from fault zones, and the applicability of {sup 36}Cl/Cl. ratios for evaluating alternative conceptual models.
QCD sum rule calculation of {gamma}{gamma}{sup *} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup 0} transition form factor
The authors develop a QCD sum rule analysis of the form factor F{sub {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}}(q{sup 2},Q{sup 2}) in the region where virtuality of one of the spacelike photons is small q{sup 2} {much_lt} 1 GeV{sup 2} while another is large: Q{sup 2} {approx_gt} 1 GeV{sup 2}. They construct the operator product expansion suitable for this kinematic situation and obtain a QCD sum rule for F{sub {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}}(0, Q{sup 2}). Their results confirm expectation that the momentum transfer dependence of F{sub {gamma}{sup *}{gamma}{sup *}{pi}{sup 0}}(0,Q{sup 2}) is close to interpolation between its Q{sup 2}=0 value fixed by the axial anomaly and Q{sup {minus}2} pQCD behavior for large Q{sup 2}. Their approach, in contrast to pQCD, does not require additional assumptions about the shape of the pion distribution amplitude {var_phi}{sub {pi}}(x). The absolute value of the 1/Q{sup 2} term obtained in this paper favors {var_phi}{sub {pi}}(x) close to the asymptotic form {var_phi}{sub {pi}}{sup as}(x) = 6f{sub {pi}}x(1{minus}x).
Can Data Recognize Its Parent Distribution?
This study is concerned with model selection of lifetime and survival distributions arising in engineering reliability or in the medical sciences. We compare various distributions, including the gamma, Weibull and lognormal, with a new distribution called geometric extreme exponential. Except for the lognormal distribution, the other three distributions all have the exponential distribution as special cases. A Monte Carlo simulation was performed to determine sample sizes for which survival distributions can distinguish data generated by their own families. Two methods for decision are by maximum likelihood and by Kolmogorov distance. Neither method is uniformly best. The probability of correct selection with more than one alternative shows some surprising results when the choices are close to the exponential distribution.
GLASS FORMULATION TESTING TO INCREASE SULFATE INCORPORATION - Final Report VSL-04R4960-1, Rev 0, 2/28/05, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of American, Washington, D.C.
About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHLW product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The melter tests described in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus ...
SMALL-SCALE MELTER TESTING WITH LAW SIMULANTS TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF HIGHER TEMPERATURE MELTER OPERATIONS - Final Report, VSL-04R49801-1, Rev. 0, 2/13/03, Vitreous State Laboratory, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.
About 50 million gallons of high-level mixed waste is currently in storage in underground tanks at The United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford site in the State of Washington. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will provide DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) with a means of treating this waste by vitrification for subsequent disposal. The tank waste will be separated into low- and high-activity fractions, which will then be vitrified respectively into Immobilized Low Activity Waste (ILAW) and Immobilized High Level Waste (IHLW) products. The ILAW product will be disposed of in an engineered facility on the Hanford site while the IHL W product will be directed to the national deep geological disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste. The ILAW and IHLW products must meet a variety of requirements with respect to protection of the environment before they can be accepted for disposal. The Office of River Protection is currently examining options to optimize the Low Activity Waste (LAW) facility and the LAW glass waste form. One option under evaluation is to enhance the waste processing rate of the vitrification plant currently under construction. It is likely that the capacity of the LAW vitrification plant can be increased incrementally by implementation of a variety of low-risk, high-probability changes, either separately or in combination. These changes include: (1) Operating at the higher processing rates demonstrated at the LAW Pilot Melter; (2) Increasing the glass pool surface area within the existing external melter envelope; (3) Increasing plant availability; (4) Increasing the glass waste loading; (5) Removing sulfate from the LAW stream; (6) Operating the melter at slightly higher temperature; (7) Installing the third LAW melter into the WTP plant; and (8) Other smaller impact changes. The tests describes in this report utilized blended feed (glass formers plus ...
EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS
The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures &lt;800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures &gt;800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.