UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 212 Matching Results

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Chestnut Blight

Description: "Chestnut blight, caused by a fungus brought into this country from Asia before 1904, is responsible for the death of millions of acres of chestnut growth in New England and the Middle Atlantic States. The disease spread rapidly to nearly all parts of the range of the native chestnut, and the remaining stands of the southern Appalachians face certain destruction. The present known distribution, its symptoms, and the fungus that causes the disease are described. The blight fungus itself does not have any effect upon the strength of chestnut timber, and blight-killed trees can be utilized for poles, posts, cordwood, lumber, and extract wood. Search is being made for native and foreign chestnuts resistant to the disease in the hope of finding a tree suitable for replacing the rapidly disappearing stands. Seedlings of Asiatic chestnuts, which have considerable natural resistance even though not immune, are being tested in the United States." -- p. ii
Date: 1930
Creator: Gravatt, G. F. & Gill, L. S.

Removing Spray Residue From Apples and Pears

Description: This bulletin gives instructions for removing spray residue from apples and pears. "Control of the codling moth has become essential in the production of marketable apples and pears in practically all deciduous-fruit districts of the United States, and through spraying with lead-aresenate has been for many years the accepted control method. Apples and pears sprayed with lead arsenate bear at harvest time an arsenical residue, and this residue must be removed in the interest of public health." -- p. 1
Date: 1931
Creator: Diehl, H. C.; Lutz, J. M. (Jacob Martin), 1908-1968 & Ryall, A. Lloyd (Albert Lloyd), 1904-

Improving the Farm Environment for Wild Life

Description: This bulletin discusses how farmers can improve their environment for wild life and game animals. Farmers should provide cover for wild life, ensure an adequate and continuous food supply, and take measures to protect wild life from farm operations, birds of prey, cats and dogs, diseases, etc.
Date: 1934
Creator: Grange, Wallace B. (Wallace Byron), 1905-1987 & McAtee, W. L. (Waldo Lee), 1883-1962

Farm Practice with Lespedeza

Description: "The use of lespedeza as a farm crop has rapidly increased during the past few years. The increase in the use of lespedeza is due partly to the excellent results that have been obtained by the farmers who have been growing the Common variety, for hay and for pasture and soil improvement, but more particularly to the introduction of some new varieties that produce better yields, are adapted to a wider range of climatic conditions, and are generally better suited to the needs of the average farm than is the Common variety. This bulletin is based on information collected from farmers located in the States of Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Kentucky who are growing lespedeza regularly as a farm crop. The information includes methods of seeding, varieties used, the place in the cropping system usually occupied by lespedeza, and practices that have developed in connection with the production and use of the crop in these States." -- p. 1
Date: 1934
Creator: Miller, H. A.

Hotbeds and Coldframes

Description: This bulletin describes the uses of hotbeds and coldframes in starting early plants. The hotbeds discussed include manure hotbeds, fuel-heated beds, and electric heating in beds and greenhouses. Coverings and care and maintenance are also discussed. Possible plants for early growth include tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, squashes, cucumbers, muskmelons, lettuce, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, and celery.
Date: 1935
Creator: W. R. (William Renwick) Beattie, b. 1870

Preventing Soil Blowing on the Southern Great Plains

Description: "Soil blowing is often a serious problem from December to May [in the Southern Great Plains], when the soil is, in many cases, bare and winds are high. This period is often referred to as the 'blow season.' The whole art of preventing and controlling soil blowing consists in keeping nonblowing materials on the surface. These may be crops, crop residues, or clods. When crops are absent, the essential feature in preventing soil blowing is the use of implements that lift clods and other nonblowing materials to the surface rather than implements that pulverize or destroy them.... Since tillage is dependent on implements, it seems of first importance to consider the implements that may be used to discuss their merits and shortcomings in relation to soil blowing.... From the general principles stated and the specific examples of implement use given, most farmers can probably decide on the correct applications for their farms." -- p. 1-3
Date: 1937
Creator: Chilcott, E. F. (Ellery Franklin), 1885-

The Farmer Looks Ahead

Description: This bulletin provides criteria by which farmers may determine how much they should plan to produce in a given year. There "are four major yardsticks: 1) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of the requirements of domestic consumers, plus; 2) What they can expect to ship to foreign countries in the next few years? 3) How much should they produce, thinking only of the requirements of soil conservation? 4) How much should farmers produce, thinking only of their incomes?" -- p. 3
Date: 1937
Creator: United States. Bureau of Agricultural Economics.

Muscadine Grapes

Description: "Muscadine grapes are indigenous to the southeastern section of the United States, where they grow in greater or less profusion in the wild state. Through careful selection from the wild grapes and scientific breeding there have been developed a considerable number of varieties particularly adapted to the home needs in the Southeast, both as table grapes and as raw material for a variety of food and beverage products. Not being resistant to low winter temperatures they do not thrive in the northern grape districts. Muscadines are relatively resistant to grape diseases and insect pests and do well with a minimum of care, but, like most fruits, respond favorably to good cultural treatment. This bulletin sets forth in nontechnical form the information accumulated by the Department [of Agriculture] over a considerable period of years on muscadine grape varieties, their bleeding, culture, and uses." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Dearing, Charles

Wildlife Conservation Through Erosion Control in the Piedmont

Description: "Erosion has left scars on a majority of farms in the Southeast. Too poor to produce crops, the eroding spots are usually abandoned. Unless they are treated to stop further washing of the soil they grow steadily larger and continually rob the farmer of more of his land. Fortunately, soil conservation and wildlife management can be effectively combined, and otherwise worthless areas made to produce a crop of game, fur bearers, and other desirable types of wildlife. The general principles of wildlife management on the farm are described in Farmers' Bulletins 1719 and 1759. The purpose of this bulletin is to show how gullies, terrace outlets, waterways, eroding field borders, pastures, and woodlands in the Piedmont region may be protected against erosion through the use of vegetation that will also provide food and cover for wildlife." -- p. ii
Date: 1937
Creator: Stevens, Ross O.

Implements and Methods of Tillage to Control Soil Blowing on the Northern Great Plains

Description: This bulletin tools and methods of tilling which can help reduce or control soil blowing and soil erosion on farms in the northern Great Plains of the United States. Among the crops discussed with relation to tilling methods are beans, corn, sorghum, potatoes, alfalfa, and sweet clover.
Date: 1938
Creator: Cole, John S. (John Selden) & Morgan, George W.

Making Lime on the Farm

Description: "The farmer can buy lime from commercial sources in the form and degree of purity desired; he can produce his own if he has a convenient supply of raw material; or he can cooperate with his neighbors in working a deposit. This bulletin deals with factors which should be considered by a farmer or a group of farmers before investing in equipment for obtaining lime from limestone or marl." -- p. 1
Date: 1938
Creator: Kessler, N. A.

Culture and Pests of Field Peas

Description: This bulletin discusses the culture of the field and diseases and insects which commonly afflict it. Diseases discussed include leaf spot, stem blight, bacterial blight, left blotch, powdery mildew, downy mildew, anthracnose, fusarium wilt, root rot, and mosaic. The pea weevil, aphid, and moth are the insects discussed, as well as the nematode.
Date: 1938
Creator: McKee, Roland & Schoth, H. A. (Harry August), b. 1891

Grading Wool

Description: Revised edition. "Most wool growers need to know more about wool grading, whether they expect to grade wool or not. This bulletin contains information about the subject so growers interested may improve their position when they are ready to sell their wool. It also suggests ways to handle the wool so that its quality will be maintained through the shearing and the preparation of the fleece." -- p. ii
Date: 1939
Creator: Christie, James W.

Soil Defense in the South

Description: "This bulletin describes farming practices that conserve soil, and how such practices may be applied to farms in a large part of the South. Its scope is limited to that part of the Cotton Belt extending west from the Georgia-Alabama line to central Texas and southern Oklahoma." -- p. i.
Date: 1938
Creator: Rowalt, E. M.

Soil Defense in the Northeast

Description: This bulletin discusses methods of soil conservation in the northeastern United States that can prevent erosion. Soil conservation practices vary with the type of agriculture being used. In addition to general farming, conservation for dairying, orcharding, market gardening, and single-crop farming are discussed.
Date: 1938
Creator: Rule, Glenn K. (Glenn Kenton), 1893-

Native and Adapted Grasses for Conservation of Soil and Moisture in the Great Plains and Western States

Description: "The information given in this bulletin should enable farmers in the Great Plains and Western States to select from the more common species of grasses some one or more suited to their needs [for soil and water conservation]. Common harvesting equipment and farm machinery can be adapted to the proper handling of native grasses. This brings the cost of such work within the means of most farmers." -- p. i. Among the grasses discussed are wheatgrass, buffalo grass, bluestem, grama, Bermuda grass, wild rye, hilaria, Sudan grass, bluegrass, panic grasses, dropseed, and needlegrass.
Date: 1939
Creator: Hoover, Max M. (Max Manley), 1895-

Terrace Outlets and Farm Drainageways

Description: "This bulletin is a compilation of the best information now available for farmers on the construction and use of terrace outlets and the protection, improvement, and maintenance of other sloping drainageways. The term "drainageways" as used in this bulletin refers primarily to channels of surface drainage in the upper reaches of watersheds or in unit drainage basins. 'Outlet' is a more restricted term and refers only to drainageways that are provided to receive and convey the discharge from the ends of terraces. The scope of this material is limited to surface runoff-disposal measures required in upland or rolling terrain where slopes are steep enough to cause channel erosion. It does not cover surface drainage or underdrainage of flatlands where natural drainage is inadequate." -- p. ii
Date: 1939
Creator: Hamilton, C. L.

Grading Dressed Turkeys

Description: "From the producer's standpoint, the correct grading of turkeys is a very important factor in the success of his enterprise. Without dependable grading, successful marketing is practically impossible, and without successful marketing, little profit may be expected. Whether the producer grades his own turkeys or has this done by a licensed grader, a familiarity with the grade descriptions and how the grades are applied will create a mutual understanding and be a source of satisfaction to producers, graders, and buyers. How to grade according to Government standards can be learned by any producer who makes a thorough study of the grade factors involved. This bulletin attempts to point out by description and illustration the most important of these factors." -- p. ii
Date: 1938
Creator: Heitz, Thomas W.

Infectious Anemia (Swamp Fever)

Description: Infectious anemia (which is also known as swamp fever) is a disease which afflicts horses and mules and results in significant financial losses for farms every year. This bulletin discusses the causes and forms of the disease, the accompanying anatomical changes in infected animals, the diagnostic process, and control measures which can be taken to prevent further spread of this serious illness.
Date: 1938
Creator: Gochenour, William S. (William Sylva), b. 1891; Stein, C. D. (Clarence Dinsmore), b. 1889 & Osteen, Oswald L. (Oswald Lamont), b. 1908

Reseeding Range Lands of the Intermountain Region

Description: "Revegetating deteriorated range lands by sowing adaptable, nutritious, and palatable grasses is vital for adequate forage production in the Intermountain region, for profitable livestock raising, and as a safeguard against flood and erosion damage. The effect of serious droughts, greatly aggravated by overstocking, has resulted in the replacement of valuable perennial grasses by annual weeds and grasses that have much less value as forage for livestock or for proper soil protection. The abandonment of unsuccessful submarginal croplands has also added greatly to the vast acreage of deteriorated but potentially productive range lands of the region in need of revegetation. Proper guides and procedure for revegetating run-down ranges and abandoned dry farms by artificial reseeding are necessary to safeguard against costly pitfalls and to insure reasonable success. The procedures herein outlined are based on the experiences and research to date and should prove helpful to those administering range lands and producing livestock in the region comprising Utah, Nevada, southern Idaho, and southwestern Wyoming, commonly referred to as the Intermountain region." -- p. i
Date: 1939
Creator: Stewart, George; Walker, R. H. (Rudger Harper), 1902- & Price, Raymond