UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 198 Matching Results

Search Results

Floods in New York, 1972, with Special Reference to Tropical Storm Agnes

Description: From introduction: Flooding and flood damage in New York during the calendar year 1972 are summarized in this report. The report was prepared at the request of the New York State Department of Transportation under provisions of an agreement between the department and the U.S. Geological Survey for a cooperative, statewide program to investigate the water resources of the State.
Date: January 1976
Creator: Robison, F. Luman

Distribution and Movement of Zinc and Other Heavy Metals in South San Francisco Bay, California

Description: From introduction: The primary objective of this study was to determine the net transport of zinc into the study area from urbanized perimeter, out of the study area across the northern boundary of the study area, and across the sediment-water interface within the study area, all within a limited time period. A secondary objective was to assemble as much data on other trace metals--their concentrations and chemical states in water, suspended solids, sediments and interstitial fluids--as possible within the time and funding constraints of the study in order to describe the existing trace metal conditions in the south bay. Thus the bulk of effort was directed toward evaluating the distribution and movements of zinc, but the data collected on the distribution and movements of zinc, but the data collected on the distribution of other metals is important and is reported here.
Date: February 1976
Creator: Bradford, Wesley L.

Geohydrology of the Anza-Terwilliger Area, Riverside County, California

Description: The Anza-Terwilliger area consists of about 96 square miles (24-9 square kilometers) in the upper parts of the Santa Margarita River and Coyote Creek drainage basins in Riverside County, Calif., about 90 miles (145 kilometers) southeast of Los Angeles. This report deals with geology, steady state and transient state of ground water, net depletion of ground water, surface-water flow, precipitation, chemistry of water, land and water use, and gravity data for the Anza-Terwilliger area. The data indicate that the rate of ground-water depletion ha's accelerated since 1950. Pumping depressions adjacent to the Cahuilla Indian Reservation have increased the hydraulic gradient and are.causing water beneath the reservation to flow toward these depressions. Total depletion of ground water since 1950 is about 14,000 acre-feet (17.3 cubic hectometers). Chemical analyses indicate that the ground water in local areas contains concentrations of nitrate above that recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency for human consumption.
Date: March 1976
Creator: Moyle, W. R., Jr.

Proposed Cross-Florida Barge Canal: Water Quality Aspects with a Section on Waste-Assimilative Capacity

Description: Abstract: The route of the partly completed Cross-Florida Barge Canal follows the St. Johns, Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers. If the canal is ·completed, the Summit Reach, connecting the Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers will be excavated into the Floridan aquifer. Large springs that discharge from this limestone and dolomite aquifer flow to the Oklawaha and Withlacoochee Rivers.
Date: February 1976
Creator: Merritt, M. L.

Availability and Chemical Characteristics of Ground Water in Central La Plata County, Colorado

Description: From introduction: This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the central part of La Plata County, Colorado. The purpose of the investigation is to describe the geologic units and the availability and quality of ground water in the central part of the county.
Date: 1976
Creator: Brogden, Robert E. & Giles, T. F.

Availability and Chemical Quality of Ground Water in the Crystal River and Cattle Creek Drainage Basins near Glenwood Springs, West-Central Colorado

Description: From introduction: This report presents the results of an investigation of the ground-water resources of the Crystal River and Cattle Creek drainage basins...The purpose of the investigation was to describe the geologic units, the aquifers and their characteristics, and the availability and chemical quality of ground water in the study area.
Date: 1976
Creator: Brogden, Robert E. & Giles, T. F.

Land-Surface Subsidence in the Area of Moses Lake Near Texas City, Texas

Description: Abstract: Removal of water, oil, and gas from the subsurface in Harris and Galveston Counties has caused declines in fluid pressures, which in turn have resulted in subsidence of the land surface. Subsidence of the land surface at Moses Lake is due principally to the removal of ground water in adjacent areas. Significant subsidence of the land surface at Moses Lake began after 1900, and as much as 1.8 feet (0.55 meters) of subsidence had occurred in the area by 1973. Probable future subsidence was calculated by two methods for two loading situations. In the first loading situation, case 1, the artesian head in the middle Chicot aquifer, in the Alta Lorna Sand (Rose, 1943), and in the Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at respective rates of 1, 3, and 3 feet (0.3, 0.9, and 0.9 meters) per year until 1980 and then cease. In the second loading situation, case 2, the artesian head in the middle Chicot aquifer, in the Alta Lorna Sand, and in the Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at respective rates of 1, 3, and 3 feet (0.3, 0.9, and 0.9 meters) per year until 1990 and then cease.
Date: October 1976
Creator: Gabrysch, R. K. & Bonnet, C. W.

Technical Manual For Estimating Low-Flow Frequency Characteristics of Streams in the Susquehanna River Basin

Description: Abstract: This report presents procedures for estimating low-flow frequency characteristics for streams in the Susquehanna River basin. The techniques can be used at ungaged sites as well as sites where insufficient data are available to make a reliable estimate. Streams have been divided into two types major and minor. Major streams are the Susquehanna, West Branch Susquehanna, Juniata, and Chemung Rivers. Points on these streams with drainage areas of more than 2,000 square miles (5,180 kilometers) are included in this category. Points on these streams with drainage areas of less than 2,000 square miles fall into the minor stream category. Generally minor streams are herein defined as those draining less than 2,000 square miles (5,180 kilometers). Multiple-regression techniques have been used to develop relations for estimating the 1-, 3-, 7-, 30-, and 183-day duration low flows at recurrence intervals of 10, 20, 50 and 100 years for annual series data and the 1-, 3-, 7-, and 30-day duration low flows, at the same recurrence intervals, for six individual months, May through October, inclusive.
Date: June 1976
Creator: Armbruster, Jeffrey T.

Water Resources of the Myakka River Basin Area, Southwest Florida

Description: Abstract: Ground water in the Myakka River basin area is obtained from a water-table aquifer and from five zones in an artesian aquifer. Wells in the water-table aquifer yield generally less- than 50 gal/min and dissolved solids concentration is less than 500 mg/1 except in coastal areas and the peninsula southwest of the Myakka River estuary. Wells in the Venice area that tap zone. 1 usually yield less than 30 gal/min. The quality of the water is good except in the peninsula area. Zone 2 is the most highly developed aquifer in the heavily populated coastal areas. Wells yield as much as 200 gal/min. In most areas, water is of acceptable quality.Wells that tap zone 3 yield as much as 500 gal/min. Fluoride concentration ranges from 1 to 3.5 mg/1. Zone 4 yields as much as 1,500 gal/min to large diameter wells. Except in the extreme northeastern part of the area water from zone 4 usually contains high concentrations of fluoride and sulfate. Zone 5 is the most productive aquifer in the area, but dissolved solids concentrations usually are too high for public supply except in the extreme northeast.Surface water derived from natural drainage is of good quality except for occasional high color in summer.
Date: December 1976
Creator: Joyner, B. F. & Sutcliffe, H., Jr.

Preliminary Results of Preimpoundment Water-Quality Studies in the Tioga River Basin, Pennsylvania and New York

Description: Abstract: The Tioga River and its major tributaries were sampled monthly from September 1973 to May 1975. Water quality in the Tioga River is degraded by acid-mine drainage entering the stream near Blossburg from both strip- and deep-mined areas. The stream supports few species of aquatic life from Blossburg to its confluence with Crooked Creek- Alkaline water of tributaries Mill Creek, Crooked Creek, and the Cowanesque River counteract the acidity carried downstream from Blossburg, and ·the water-quality of the Tioga River gradually improves, supporting a more diversified population of fish and aquatic life. Relationships between selected water-quality parameters have been developed for the sampling stations throughout the basin. Downstream trends were also examined. The relationships will be further refined and implemented in predictive water-quality models as more data are collected.
Date: July 1976
Creator: Ward, Janice R.

Limnological Survey of Sacony Creek Basin, Berks County, Pennsylvania

Description: Samples of water, fish, and benthic macroinvertebrates collected at 10 sampling stations over a 10-month period indicate that Sacony Creek and its major tributaries possess water of good to excellent quality. No excessive quantities of dissolved nutrients, oxidizable matter, or fecal coliform bacteria were detected. Fish inhabitants include a sizable wild trout population in the upper Sacony basin and a diverse warm-water population, dominated by white suckers (Catostomus commersoni), in the lower basin. A population of 590 trout or 119 pounds per acre (133 kilograms per square hectometer) was estimated for good habitat in the upper basin. A maximum standing crop of 558 pounds per acre (626 kilograms per square hectometer) was measured at' one of the more productive reaches. Benthic macroinvertebrate collections tended to support the water chemistry and fish population studies. Diversity (d) and Redundancy (r) ranged from 2.44 to 3.46 and 0.14 to 0.38, respectively. Such diversity and redundancy values indicate good quality water at all stations.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Barker, James L. & Kulp, Kenneth P.

Computer Simulation Model of the Pleistocene Valley-Fill Aquifer in Southwestern Essex and Southeastern Morris Counties, New Jersey

Description: From purpose and scope: The purpose of the present study by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Division of Water Resources of the New Jersey of Environmental Protection is to make a quantitative hydrologic analysis of the known buried valley-fill aquifer in southwestern Essex and southeastern Morris County Counties in order to provide water-resources planners with the hydrologic bases to plan ground-water development and to allocate available water.
Date: May 1976
Creator: Meisler, Harold

Geology and Ground-Water Resources of Camden County, New Jersey

Description: From introduction: The purpose of this investigation is to collect and interpret the basic hydrologic and geologic data and to appraise and report on the ground-water resources of Camden County. The objectives were to define the thickness and areal extent of the hydrologic units, evaluate the hydraulic characteristics of the aquifers, determine the effect of pumpage on the water levels of the area, define the source of recharge of the aquifers, and to evaluate the chemical quality of the ground water.
Date: June 1976
Creator: Farlekas, George M.; Nemickas, Bronius & Gill, Harold E.

A Technique for Estimating the Time of Travel of Water in Indiana streams

Description: Abstract: Estimates of the travel time of waterborne particles in streams is important for pollution studies and in the event of spills of contaminants. This report provides data for the 16 Indiana streams on which time-of-travel information has been obtained and a means for estimating the velocity of any naturally flowing stream in Indiana with a drainage area of 80 square miles (210 square kilometers) or more. Measured velocity rates compiled from the time-of-travel data collected in Indiana are related to 25, 50, 100, and 200 percent of the average discharge of streams shown in this report. Velocities at these discharges are significantly related to their respective watershed characteristics (average discharge and slope).Generalized relations of the velocities as functions of the streams' watershed characteristics are developed as multivariate regression equations using the data from each of the measured streams.
Date: March 1976
Creator: Eikenberry, S. E. & Davis, L. G.

WATEQF: A FORTRAN IV Version of WATEQ, a Computer Program for Calculating Chemical Equilibrium of Natural Waters

Description: Abstract: WATEQF is a FORTRAN IV computer program that models the thermodynamic speciation of inorganic ions and complex species in solution for a given water analysis. The original version (WATEQ) was written in 1973 by A. H. Truesdell and B. F. Jones in Programming Language/one (PL/1). With but a few exceptions, the thermochemical data, speciation, activity coefficients, and general calculation procedure of WATEQF is identical to the PL/1 version. This report notes the differences between WATEQF and WATEQ, demonstrates how to set up the input data to execute WATEQF, provides a test case for comparison, and makes available a listing of WATEQF.
Date: September 1976
Creator: Plummer, L. Niel; Jones, Blair F, & Truesdell, Alfred H.

Recycling Ground Water in Waushara County, Wisconsin: Resource Management for Cold-Water Fish Hatcheries

Description: Recycling water within the local ground-water system is an effective means to increase quantity and control water temperature of the water supply and to control or avoid environmental pollution. A fish-rearing facility, operated for 15 months, returned water to the local ground-water system through an infiltration pond and recycled 83 percent of its water supply. For each 100 gallons pumped the net stress on the aquifer was equivalent to withdrawing 17 gallons. Despite recycling, nutrient content and temperature of the water supply were acceptable throughout the study period. The rearing-facility nutrient output ranged from 1 to 2 pounds of nitrate-nitrogen per day, but nitrate-nitrogen levels in the water supply remained below 4 mg/1. The water temperature ranged from 7°C to 14°C. Mathematical relations developed show that acceptable nitrate-nitrogen levels and water temperatures nearly optimum for salmonid rearing could be maintained during full-scale hatchery operation.
Date: April 1976
Creator: Novitzki, R. P.

Land-Surface Subsidence at Seabrook, Texas

Description: Abstract: Removal of water, oil, and gas from the subsurface in Harris and Galveston Counties, Texas, has caused a decline in fluid pressures, which in turn has resulted in subsidence of the land surface. Subsidence of the land surface at Seabrook is due principally to the removal of water. Significant subsidence of the land surface probably began after 1920, and a minimum of about 3.3 feet (1.0 m) and a maximum of about 4.3 feet (1.3 m) of subsidence had occurred at Seabrook by 1973. Probable future subsidence was calculated by two different methods for each of two different loading situations. In the first loading situation, case I, the artesian heads in the Alta Lorna Sand (Rose, 1943) and Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at the respective rates of 8 feet (2.4 m) per year and 7 feet (2.1 m) per year until 1980 and then cease. In the second loading situation, case II, the artesian heads in the Alta Lorna Sand and Evangeline aquifer would continue to decline at rates of 8 and 7 feet (2.4 and 2.1 m) per year until 1990 and then cease.
Date: October 1976
Creator: Gabrysch, R. K. & Bonnet, C. W.

Availability of Ground Water near Carmel, Hamilton County, Indiana

Description: Abstract: Flow in the unconsolidated glacial deposits near the city of Carmel in central Indiana was simulated by a digital-computer model in a study of hydraulic characteristics of the deposits. The study shows that 21 • 3 million gallons per day (933 liters per second) of additional water could be withdrawn from the aquifer for an indefinite period of time. This pumpage is approximately 5 million gallons per day (219 liters per second) above the projected water needs of Carmel for 1990. Saturated thickness, transmissivity, and storage coefficient of the outwash aquifer along the White River east of Carmel were determined, using available data supplemented by test drilling . The saturated thickness of the aquifer ranges from 10 to 110 feet 0 to 34 meters ); transmissivity ranges from 1,000 feet squared per day (93 meters squared per day) to 24 ,000 feet squared per day (2 ,230 meters squared per day); and the average storage coefficient is 0.11.
Date: May 1976
Creator: Gillies, D. C.

Hydrologic Relations Between Lakes and Aquifers in a Recharge Area near Orlando, Florida

Description: Abstract: The three lakes investigated gain water- from adjoining water-table aquifer and lose water to Floridan aquifer by downward leakage. Net seepage (net exchange of water between lake and aquifers) can be estimated by equation S = AX + BY, where S is net seepage, X represents hydraulic gradient between lake and water-table aquifer, A is lumped parameter representing effect of hydaulic conductivity and cross-sectional area of materials in flow section of water-table aquifer, Y is head difference between lake level and potentiometric surface of Floridan aquifer, and B is lumped parameter representing effect of hydraulic conductivity, area, and thickness of materials between lake bottom and Floridan aquifer. If values of S, X, and Y are available for two contrasting water-level conditions, coefficients A and B are determinable by solution of two simultaneous equations. If the relation between lake- and ground-water level is same on all sides of the lake with regard to each aquifer and if X and Y are truly representative of these relations, then X and Y terms of equation provide valid estimates of inflow to lake from water-table aquifer and outflow from lake to Floridan aquifer.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Lichtler, W. F.; Hughes, G. H. & Pfischner, F. L.

Distribution and Trend of Nitrate, Chloride, and Total Solids in Water in the Magothy Aquifer in Southeast Nassau County, New York, from the 1950's Through 1973

Description: Abstract: Concentrations of nitrate, chloride, and total sol ids in water in the Magothy aquifer, southeast Nassau County, N.Y., show a steadily increasing trend from the early 1950's to 1973. Vertical distribution of nitrate, chloride, and total-solids concentrations as shown in sections of the study area indicate downward movement of these constituents. Maximum concentrations are in a zone underlying the areas of Westbury, Hicksvil.le, and Plainview. Nitrate (as nitrogen) concentration increased from 4-5 milligrams per liter to 7 milligrams per liter in the area of Westbury and from 3 to 10 milligrams per liter in Plainview during the period 1950-73. During this same period, a 10 milligram-per-liter line of equal-chloride concentration on a cross section in the Westbury area moved downward a distance of less than 50 feet (15 meters), and in the area of Hicksville nearly 150 feet (45 meters). Total-solids concentration doubled in the area of Plainview, where maximum downward movement of pollutants was observed.
Date: August 1976
Creator: Ku, Henry F. H. & Sulam, Dennis J.