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Postglacial Volcanic Deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and Potential Hazards From Future Eruptions

Description: Abstract: Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. Large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater-Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by stream explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces or processes that gradually decrease stability. Large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice ...
Date: 1978
Creator: Hyde, Jack H. & Crandell, Dwight Raymond

Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota and Washington: Final Report, Volume 1. Instrumentation and Methods

Description: From abstract: The objective of the work was to define areas showing surface indications of a generally higher uranium content where detailed exploration for uranium would most likely be successful.
Date: March 1979
Creator: Texas Instruments Incorporated

Final Environmental Statement by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission for Greene County Nuclear Power Plant

Description: Abstract: A Final Environmental Statement for the Power Authority of the State of New York for the construction of the Greene County Nuclear Power Plant (Docket No. 50-549) located in Greene County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This statement provides (1) a summary of environmental impact and adverse effects of the proposed facility, and (2) a consideration of principal alternatives. Also included are comments of governmental agencies and other organizations on the Draft Environmental Statement for the project and staff responses to these comments. The NRC staff has concluded, based on a weighing of environmental, economic, technical, and other benefit against environmental costs and available alternatives, that a construction permit should be denied because the alternative sites available to the applicant are environmentally preferable. If the permit is granted, the applicant will be required to take the necessary mitigating actions to decrease the aesthetic impact by using alternative closed cycle cooling systems and to undertake monitoring programs to identify, evaluate and mitigate construction related community and public services impacts in the immediate three-county impact area.
Date: January 1979
Creator: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

Safety Evaluation Report: Related to the Preliminary Design of the Standard Reference System RESAR-414

Description: From introduction: This Safety Evaluation Report summarizes the results of the technical evaluation of the proposed RESAR-414 design performed by the NRC staff, and delineates the scope of the technical matters considered in evaluating the radiological safety aspects of the RESAR-414 design. Environmental aspects were not considered in our review of RESAR-414, but will be addressed in each utility application for a construction permit which references RESAR-414.
Date: 1978
Creator: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

Uranium in the Southern United States

Description: From introduction: In this study on raw material sources of uranium the Southern Interstate Nuclear Board has catalogued all known occurrences of uranium and some references to thorium in a 17-state area (P1. 1). These occurrences have been evaluated as potential sources of uranium by the State Geological Surveys and the consultant group of SINB. Favorability guides have been applied to the known occurrences and recommendations have been made for future action by the states involved, federal agencies, or by industry. State recommendations are included in state-by-state summaries. The state reports were written either by personnel of the State Geological Surveys or were abstracted from State geological survey data by members of the consultant group...The purpose of this study was to compile information on and systematically assess uranium and other radioactive occurrences in the region. The SINB undertook the project because of its statutory, interstate capability as an extension of government in each of the 17 states, an arrangement that lends itself effectively to this cooperative undertaking.
Date: November 1970
Creator: Southern Interstate Nuclear Board

Final Environmental Statement by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation for Montague Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2

Description: The proposed project: Pursuant to the Atomic Energy Act, as amended, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations in Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, an application with an accompanying Environmental Report, was filed by Northeast Utilities (hereinafter referred to as the applicant) for construction permits for two generating units designated as the Montague Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-496 and 50-497), each of which is powered by a boiling water reactor (BWR) and is designed for initial operation at approximately 3579 megawatts thermal (MWt) with a net electrical output of 1150 megawatts electric (MWe). A safety design rating of 3759 (MWt) has been used in assessing the impact in this report. Condenser cooling will be accomplished through the use of natural-draft cooling towers. Makeup water for the cooling towers will be obtained from the Connecticut River, and the tower discharge (blowdown) will be returned to the Connecticut River. The proposed facilities will be located on the 1900-acre Montague Plain in the Town of Montague, Franklin County, in northwestern Massachusetts about 1.8 miles east of the Connecticut River and about 3.5 miles east-southeast of the Town of Greenfield, Massachusetts, the largest community within 10 miles with a population of about 15,000. Integration of the power from the Montague Nuclear Power Station will be accomplished by individual routes for each unit, requiring the construction of approximately 118 miles of 345-kV circuit transmission lines into existing electrical systems. A 345-kV switchyard will be located on the Montague site in proximity to the generating units and will constitute the terminus of the 345-kV circuits over which the output of the station will be delivered to the load centers. The route for Unit 1 will terminate at the Ludlow, Massachusetts, substation, and the route for Unit 2 will terminate at the ...
Date: February 1977
Creator: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation.

Reactor Safety Study: An Assessment of Accident Risks in U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants, Appendix 1

Description: From introduction: In conventional safety analyses, a suitable design basis, including redundancy, is specified to assure a minimum level of operability of ESFs, and the likelihood or consequences of total failure of ESFs are not considered further. In this study all failures are considered possible, but appropriate probabilities are assigned to them. Thus, many potential accident sequences are described in the following discussions as if they will surely occur, with no reservations expressed as to their likelihood or significance. However, most of these sequences have such low probability that they do not contribute to the overall risk from reactor accidents. In fact, in order to make an overall risk assessment, a major task of this study was to identify the sequences that are the dominant contributors to risk. In this study the initial failures or initiating events that could lead to significant consequences were examined to varying degrees. Those that seemed to contribute significantly to potential risks were analyzed in considerable detail; those that did not, received less detailed consideration. This is discussed more fully in section 3 of this appendix.
Date: October 1975
Creator: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission