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Geological and Geophysical Survey of Fluorspar Areas in Hardin County, Illinois

Description: From abstract: Pt 1. The present work seems to confirm the genetic theory previously published, namely that [Illinois Cave in Rock] deposits were formed by ascending solutions. These solutions probably followed minor fissures that connected below with larger fissures, which in turn probably connected with a major fault zone. It is believed that where such minor fissures extended upward only to the shale or other impervious cap rock, or were greatly reduced in size where they penetrated such beds, the solutions spread laterally along the contact and along the limestone beds beneath it and replaced the limestone. Pt 2. This report is a presentation of the results of an electrical-resistivity survey conducted in the fluorspar-bearing areas of Hardin County, Ill., principally during the field seasons of 1934 and 1935.
Date: 1944
Creator: Currier, Louis W.; Wagner, Oscar Emil, Jr. & Hubbert, M. King

Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona

Description: From abstract: The manganese deposits of the Artillery Mountains region lie within an area of about 25 square miles between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, on the west side of the Bill Williams River in west-central Arizona. The richest croppings are on the northeast side of this area, among the foothills of the Artillery Mountains. They are 6 to 10 miles from Alamo. The nearest shipping points are Congress, about 50 miles to the east, and Aguila, about 50 miles to the southeast. The principal manganese deposits are part of a sequence of alluvial fan and playa material, probably of early Pliocene age, which were laid down in a fault basin. They are overlain by later Pliocene (?) basalt flows and sediments and by Quaternary basalt and alluvium. The Pliocene (?) rocks are folded into a shallow composite syncline that occupies the valley between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, and the folded rocks along either side of the valley, together with the overlying Quaternary basalt, are broken by faults that have produced a group of horsts, grabens, and step-fault blocks.
Date: 1944
Creator: Lasky, Samuel G. & Webber, N. B.

Catenary Chart 3

Description: Chart of catenary curve ordinates: "The curve gives approximate values of sag at all points on the catenary curve expressed in per cent of the center sag. The error is negligible for all spans in which the center sag is less than 10% of the span length." It is enlarged from figures in NBS discussion of national electrical safety code (handbook H39).
Date: August 7, 1944
Creator: United States. National Bureau of Standards.

NACA Investigation of a Jet-Propulsion System Applicable to Flight

Description: Following a brief history of the NACA investigation of jet-propulsion, a discussion is given of the general investigation and analyses leading to the construction of the jet-propulsion ground-test mock-up. The results of burning experiments and of test measurements designed to allow quantitative flight-performance predictions of the system are presented and correlated with calculations. These calculations are then used to determine the performance of the system on the ground and in the air at various speeds and altitudes under various burning conditions. The application of the system to an experimental airplane is described and some performance predictions for this airplane are made. It was found that the main fire could be restricted to an intense, small, and short annular blue flame burning steadily and under control in the intended combustion space. With these readily obtainable combustion conditions, the combustion chamber the nozzle walls and the surrounding structure could be maintained at normal temperatures. The system investigated was found to be capable of burning one-half the intake air up the fuel rates of 3 pounds per second. Calculations were shown to agree well with experiment. It was concluded that the basic features of the jet-propulsion system investigation in the ground-test mock-up were sufficiently developed to be considered applicable to flight installation. Calculations indicated that an airplane utilizing this jet-propulsion system would have unusual capabilities in the high-speed range above the speeds of conventional aircraft and would, in addition, have moderately long cruising ranges if only the engine were used.
Date: April 1, 1944
Creator: Brown, Clinton E.