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The Significance of Geologic Conditions in Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 3, Wyoming

Description: From Introduction: The work on which this report is based consisted of detailed field and office studies which occupied the greater part of the summer of 1927. During this period mapping was done with plane table and telescopic alidade on a scale of 1 inch to 1,000 feet, and wells, faults, and outcrops within the productive part of the Teapot field were located in detail.
Date: 1931
Creator: Thom, W. T., Jr. & Spieker, Edmund M.

Geology of the Kettleman Hills Oil Field, California: Stratigraphy, Paleontology, and Structure

Description: From Introduction: The field work that furnished the basis for this report was begun in 1930 and was continued at intervals until 1934. The anticlinal character of the Kettleman Hills is apparent to even the casual observer, but the many structural complications due to an intricate network of minor faults, at least in North Dome and Middle Dome, are much less obvious. Though it is improbable that these faults have any relation to the occurrence of oil, an attempt was made to map them, not only to represent the structure adequately but also because the stratigraphy could not be understood if they were neglected. Faunal zones were particularly useful in mapping. On the other hand, some lithologic units proved to be more persistent than had been expected. The two sets of features-fossils and lithology-served as checks on each other.
Date: 1940
Creator: Woodring, W. P.; Stewart, Ralph & Richards, R. W.

Mollusca From the Miocene and Lower Pliocene of Virginia and North Carolina: Part 2. Scaphopoda and Gastropoda

Description: Introduction: Part 2 of the Systematic Report continues and concludes the study of the Mollusca from the Miocene and lower Pliocene of Virginia and North Carolina. One hundred and nineteen species, only a fraction of the known fauna, are reviewed and 66 additional species are described and figured. (See faunal chart, pp. 180-183.) The report upon the gastropods suffers from the same shortcomings obvious in the work on the pelecypods. Most of the material is from old collections made before the importance of the exact placing of the fossil locality both areally and vertically was recognized. Many of the citations of outcrops are vague and the sections generalized. Detailed field studies, particularly on the zoning of the Yorktown formation in southern Virginia and northern North Carolina, were begun later by Wendell P. Mansfield, but he died in the summer of 1939 before the completion of the work.
Date: 1948
Creator: Gardner, Julia Anna & Mansfield, Wendell C.

Geology and Ore Deposits of the Park City District, Utah

Description: From purpose of this investigation: investigation.-The investigation of the geology of Long Island was undertaken in connection with a study of the underground waters of the island made by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Commission on Additional Water Supply of New York City. During the progress of the work many new geologic facts were developed, some of which demanded extensive modifications of the views previously held as to the structure and geologic history of the island.
Date: 1912
Creator: Boutwell, J. M.

Geologic History of the Yosemite Valley

Description: The principal result of the investigations upon which this report is based is the determination within narrow limits of the preglacial depth of the Yosemite Valley and of other facts concerning its preglacial development which permit fairly definite estimates of the proportionate shares of work performed by stream and by glacier. The investigations comprise a detailed survey of the glacial and geomorphologic features of the Yosemite region and an equally intensive study of its rock formations, supplemented by reconnaissance work of both kinds in adjoining parts of the Sierra Nevada.
Date: 1930
Creator: Matthes, Franc╠žois E.

Geologic History of the Yosemite Valley

Description: The principal result of the investigations upon which this report is based is the determination within narrow limits of the preglacial depth of the Yosemite Valley and of other facts concerning its preglacial development which permit fairly definite estimates of the proportionate shares of work performed by stream and by glacier. The investigations comprise a detailed survey of the glacial and geomorphologic features of the Yosemite region and an equally intensive study of its rock formations, supplemented by reconnaissance work of both kinds in adjoining parts of the Sierra Nevada.
Date: 1930
Creator: Matthes, Franc╠žois E.

Foraminifera From the Northern Olympic Peninsula, Washington

Description: From introduction: This report deals with the stratigraphic and ecologic significance of Foraminifera contained in a Tertiary sequence that crops out in the northern part of the Olympic Peninsula, Wash. (pl. 1). The work was done as a part of a program of geologic investigations for oil and gas possibilities conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.
Date: unknown
Creator: Rau, Weldon W.

Stratigraphy of Outcropping Permian Rocks in Parts of Northeastern Arizona and Adjacent Areas

Description: From introduction: In the spring and early summer of 1950 the writers undertook an investigation of the outcropping Permian rocks in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and parts of southern Utah. This work had as its specific objective the establishing of correlations of Permian rocks in the Zuni uplift, Defiance uplift, and Monument Valley upwarp. The determination of these relations, it is believed, will be of aid in the current activities of the Geological Survey in the Navajo Reservation which have as objectives the investigation of the mineral fuels and water resources of the area.
Date: 1961
Creator: Read, C. B. & Wanek, Alexander A.

The Bannock Thrust Zone Southeastern Idaho

Description: Abstract: The Bannock overthrust in southeastern Idaho and northcentral Utah was originally described by Richards and Mansfield (1912) as a single large thrust fault that formed at the close of the Laramide orogeny and was folded by renewed compression near the end of Pliocene time. Later Mansfield expanded and revised his interpretation of the Bannock overthrust so that at least the northern part of the overthrust was thought to be a thrust zone in which the individual faults originated in a folded sole thrust. Detailed mapping in areas critical to Richards and Mansfield's interpretations has shown that the faults thought by them to be parts of one large thrust are separate faults, and that, although some of the thrust surfaces are curved, they were not folded in Pliocene time but probably were folded during a late stage of the thrusting. Extensions of the Bannock thrust to the north, south, east, and west based upon extrapolation of a single large folded thrust surface are not warranted. The Bannock overthrust is reinterpreted as a westward-dipping imbricate thrust zone possibly several tens of miles wide extending at least from southwestern Montana to north-central Utah. It is recommended that the name "Bannock overthrust" no longer be used, and that this zone of imbricate thrusts in the southeast corner of Idaho be called the Bannock thrust zone. The thrusts range in age from Late Jurassic to post- Early Cretaceous and are progressively younger from west to east; strong regional compressive forces do not appear to have been active in the area as late as Pliocene time. The upper plates of the thrusts moved to the northeast in response to an unknown force. Steep eastward-trending tear faults formed during thrusting probably in response to differential movement among the eastward-moving thrust plates. In Tertiary and Quaternary time ...
Date: 1963
Creator: Armstrong, Frank C. & Cressman, Earle Rupert

Geology of the Hot Sulphur Springs quadrangle, Grand County, Colorado

Description: Scope and Purpose of Work: The quadrangle was mapped as part of the U.S. Geological Survey program of classifying and evaluating lands in the Public Domain. Mineral rights for coal had been retained in parts or all of Tps. 2 and 3 N., Rs. 77, 78, and 79 W. These areas are in part underlain by sedimentary rocks of Late Cretaceous(?) and early Tertiary age (Middle Park Formation), and in North Park these rocks are called the Coalmont Formation and contain coal. The chief purpose of the work was to map and study any coal beds found and to make a detailed geologic map that can be used as part of a geological atlas of the United States.
Date: 1968
Creator: Izett, Glen Arthur

A Descriptive Catalog of Selected Aerial Photographs of Geologic Features in the United States

Description: From introduction: The U.S. Geological Survey has selected and assembled sets of photographs that illustrate numerous types of geologic features in the United States. This catalog lists these special sets of photographs that are available for purchase and describes the features illustrated. One reduced photograph from each set is shown on the back pages of this catalog to assist the purchaser in his selection.
Date: 1968
Creator: Geological Survey (U.S.)

Postglacial Volcanic Deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and Potential Hazards From Future Eruptions

Description: Abstract: Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. Large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater-Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by stream explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces or processes that gradually decrease stability. Large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice ...
Date: 1978
Creator: Hyde, Jack H. & Crandell, Dwight Raymond

Geologic Studies, Project Gnome, Eddy County, New Mexico

Description: From abstract: For Project Gnome, part of the Plowshare Program to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy, a nuclear device was detonated December 10, 1961, underground in rack salt of the Permian Salado Formation southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Geological Survey's investigations on behalf of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission provided basic geologic and geophysical information needed to define preshot and postshot geologic and hydrologic conditions at and near the site. This report describes the geology of the site, some physical and chemical properties of the rocks, and the known effects of the nuclear detonation on the rocks of the site.
Date: 1968
Creator: Gard, Leonard Meade, Jr.