UNT Libraries Government Documents Department - 4,537 Matching Results

Search Results

Report on Hack's Canyon Uranium Mine, Mohave County, Arizona
This is a geological report on the uranium mine in Hack's Canyon, Mohave County, Arizona.
Manual of Fire-Loss Prevention of the Federal Fire Council
From preface: This issue of the Manual of Fire-Loss Prevention, the first edition of which was published in 1934, includes revisions and additions made in part to cover improvements in the past 10 years in methods of preventing and controlling fires. Such methods remain dependent largely on the elimination of preventable fires and abatement of loss from those that originate, by the use of appropriate designs and materials in building construction and the installation of applicable fire alarm and extinguishing equipment, to the extent justified by the hazard.
Uranium Possibilities in Arizona Exclusive of the Colorado Plateau
From introduction: This report represents an effort to assemble, relate, and evaluate available information about possible primary uranium mineralization in the state of Arizona. This is the initial step in preparation for a system ratio field study of the state.
Supplemental and Summary Report on Western Carrizo Uplift and Chuska Mountains Areas of Northern Navajo Indian Reservation Northeastern Arizona
General purpose of survey: During the period 1943 and 1944, the primary purpose was to locate, describe, sample, and generally evaluate the SOM-vanadium mineralization in the western Carrizo Uplift and Chuska Mountains Areas. To this end, the areal geology of the areas, with emphasis on the Salt Wash member of the Morrison formation, was mapped. The triangulation and the laying out of leased plots were supplemental parts of this work. The field work in 1945 was for the purpose of collecting additional and supplemental geological data in order to complete the record and to calculate the ore reserves of the areas.
Supplemental and Summary Report on Western Carrizo Uplift and Chuska Mountains Areas of Northern Navajo Indian Reservation Northeastern Arizona: [Part 2] Appendix
This report presents maps on the geology of the Western Carrizo Uplift and the Chuska Mountains of Arizona in the Northern Navajo Indian reservation.
Geology and Ore Resources of the Uranium-Vanadium Depositional Province of the Colorado Plateau Region
From introduction and acknowledgements: This report is written to supplement and complete the record contained in some fifty district and special reports already submitted, and duplication of material in district reports has been studiously avoided. The data herein contained are largely of a regional type, inclusion of which was not wholly appropriate to the district reports.
Report on Reserves and Production Situation of Vanadiferous and Related Ores in Colorado Plateau Region
From introduction: The general distribution of known deposits of vanadium-bearing sandstone, which also contain some uranium and radium, is shown in figure 1 1/ and Exhibit A, plate 53. 2/ During 1939-41 the Geological Survey made detailed geological studies of these deposits in the Uravan district, Montrose County, Colorado, as well as preliminary examinations in other parts of the Colorado Plateau vanadium region. In 1942 detailed geological studies were made o the deposits in the Egnar-Slick Rock district, San Miguel Co., Colo.; 3/ the Carrizo Moungains district, Navajo Indian Reservation, Arizona and New Mexico; 4/ the Placerville district, San Miguel County, Colo. 5/ and the Monticello district, San Juan Co., Utah. 6/ Since May 3, 1943, the Gelogical Survey has guided the Bureau of Mines program of prospecting these deposits in parts of Colorado and Utah.
Refrigeration System Used in Mercury Isotope Collections
From introduction: During 1948, the Isotope Research and Production Division undertook to obtain small quantities of nearly pure mercury isotopes by electromagnetic isotope separation. The possible use of a mercury isotope of even-numbered mass to establish an international standard of length required an isotopic purity greater than 99 per cent. It, became apparent that this degree of separation could only be achieved by preventing random diffusion of un-ionized mercury which otherwise would contaminate the isotope collectors.
Vanadium Deposits in the Carrizo Mountains District, Navajo Indian Reservation, Northeastern Arizona and Northwestern New Mexico
From abstract: The Carrizo Mountains vanadium district is in the Navajo Indian Reservation, northeastern Arizona and northwestern New Mexico. From May through October, 1942, two mining companies, operating under lease agreements with the Navajo Service, opened several mines in the district and produced a total of about 6,000 tons of ore, averaging approximately 2.2 percent.
Memorandum Listing the Areas in Colorado, Utah, Arizona and New Mexico that are Geologically Favorable for Developing Large Reserves of Vanadium Ore by Prospecting
Introduction: Vanadium ore is being mined at many places in western Colorado, southeastern Utah, northeastern Arizona, and northwestern New Mexico (fig. 1). Eight mills in this region produced about 4,300,000 pounds of V2 05 in 1942, representing about 90 percent of the vanadium obtained from domestic sources. Although ore production has mostly exceeded mill capacity since 1937, production during the last half of 1942 averaged only about 19,000 tons or ore a month, whereas the capacity of these mills total about 22,000 tons a month. At the expected rate of ore production, ore stockpiles will be exhausted sometime in 1944, and these mills will then have excess capacity. With more intensive prospecting than now practiced, however, it is believed that sufficient reserves can be indicated to sustain capacity operation of these mills for several years. This memorandum is prepared to specify those areas that are considered most favorable from a geologic standpoint for developing large reserves of vanadium ore by prospecting. It is based on intensive studies by the Geological Survey since 1939 in most of the areas that produce vanadium ore.
Geology and Chromite Deposits of the Camagüey District, Camagüey Province, Cuba
From abstract: Geophysical prospecting by gravity methods has been successful in finding new deposits in the [Camaguey] district, and the present studies have brought out new information on the localization and attitudes of the known deposits that may be of assistance in planning future geophysical work.
Geological and Geophysical Survey of Fluorspar Areas in Hardin County, Illinois
From abstract: Pt 1. The present work seems to confirm the genetic theory previously published, namely that [Illinois Cave in Rock] deposits were formed by ascending solutions. These solutions probably followed minor fissures that connected below with larger fissures, which in turn probably connected with a major fault zone. It is believed that where such minor fissures extended upward only to the shale or other impervious cap rock, or were greatly reduced in size where they penetrated such beds, the solutions spread laterally along the contact and along the limestone beds beneath it and replaced the limestone. Pt 2. This report is a presentation of the results of an electrical-resistivity survey conducted in the fluorspar-bearing areas of Hardin County, Ill., principally during the field seasons of 1934 and 1935.
Geology of the Coastal Plain of Georgia
From preface: The manuscript of this report, which is the culmination of field and office studies carried on intermittently s' ice 1914, partly in cooperation with the Geological Survey of Georgia, was completed early in 1938. It was prepared with the expectation that it would form part of a more comprehensive report on the geology of Georgia by several authors, which was intended to accompany a geologic map of the entire State on a scale of 1: 500,000. However, this map without the text was published in 1939 by the Georgia Division of Mines, Mining and Geology. Part of this map is reproduced herein as plate 1 without revision.
Coal Deposits of the Santa Clara District Near Tonichi, Sonora, Mexico
From abstract: The Santa Clara coal district is 7 to 10 kilometers west of Tonichi, a small town on the Rio Yaqui, in southeastern Sonora, Mexico. Tonichi was the terminus of a branch railroad from Corral until May 1945, when the end of the line was removed. The coal deposits were developed by the Southern Pacific Railroad from the 1890's until about 1911, when the mines were abandoned, partly because the coal was found unsuitable for use in locomotives. Other coal deposits, near Los Bronces and San Javier, west of the Santa Clara district, were mined for a number of years to provide coal for a silver smelter at San Javier which was abandoned sometime during the 1920's. Since 1942 the Santa Clara deposits have been reopened; through 1945 about 50,000 tons of coal had been shipped, at first to the Boleo copper smelter at Santa Rosalia, Baja California, and more recently to Guadalajara, Jalisco, for the manufacture of calcium carbide.
Manganese Resources of the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona
From introduction: The sampling on which the estimates of ore reserves in this report are partly based was done by Lasky and Roberts. The text was written by Lasky, who, except where otherwise noted, is responsible for any descriptions, comments, and conclusions concerning the area beyond the limits of the Hanna holdings, as well as for all statements concerning reserves and recommendations for future prospecting.
Antimony Deposits of El Antimonio District Sonora, Mexico
From introduction: This is one of a series of detailed studies of the antimony deposits of Mexico, which were investigated by the United States Geological Survey and the Instituto de Geologia de Mexico. The investigation was part of a cooperative program sponsored by the Interdepartmental Committee for Scientific and Cultural Cooperation, under the auspices of the Department of State.
Manganese Deposits of the Talamantes District Near Parral, Chihuahua, Mexico
From abstract: The Talamantes district, 20 kilometers east of Parral in southern Chihuahua, has been the second largest producer of manganese ore in Mexico. Production, which started during World War I and has been more or less continuous since 1930, has totaled about 50,000 tons of ore with an average manganese content of 40 or 41 percent. The mines are on the Mesa de Talamantes, which is underlain by folded Cretaceous (?) limestone, overlain unconformably by gently dipping Tertiary rhyolite flows and tuff, volcanic breccia, agglomerate, and tuffaceous sandstone. Steeply dipping normal faults of northerly trend cut the rock and divide the mesa into a series of blocks.
Quicksilver Deposits Near the Little Missouri River, Pike County, Arkansas
From introduction: In this study the Geological Survey and the Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the Interior, cooperated. The author prepared detailed geologic maps showing the surface topography, geology, and workings of 11 mines, and the underground workings and geology of 7 of these; the Bureau of Mines engineers directed diamond-drilling and.bulldozer-trenching. The locations of the detailed maps are shown on plate 23, an index map overprinted on a segment of the map made by Reed and Wells.
Quicksilver Deposits of the Parkfield District, California
From abstract: The Parkfield district, one of the minor California quicksilver districts, lies on the southern end of the Diablo Range, in the southeastern part of Monterey County and the westernmost tip of Kings County. (...) Two geologically similar areas, separated by 10 miles of unmineralized rocks, have been mapped. These areas contain (1) sedimentary, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks belonging to the Franciscan formation, of probable Jurassic age, (2) sedimentary rocks of Cretaceous age, (3) a few outcrops of fossiliferous strata assigned to the Temblor formation, of middle Miocene age, (4) large masses of serpentine emplaced along fault zones in post-Miocene time, (5) lenses of silica-carbonate rock formed by the alteration of the serpentine, and (6) large areas of landslide.
Chromite Deposits of Red Bluff Bay and Vicinity, Baranof Island, Alaska
From introduction: The Red Bluff Bay area was examined briefly for the Geological Survey by John C. Reed and others in 1939. During the summer of 1941 the writers, with R. E. L. Rutledge, mapped this area on a scale of 1:12,000, and examined the serpentine masses in the interior during the course of reconnaissance trips into the surrounding region.
An Autunite Deposit in the Rosamond Hills, Kern County, California
From introduction: An autunite deposit in the SW 1/4 sec. 25, T. 10 N., R. 13 W. San Bernardino meridian, was visited by F. M. Chace on May 6 and 15, 1950. The deposit is about 100 yards west of a north-south country road and is at an altitude of approximately 2,775 feet. The autunite-bearing tuffaceous sandstone strikes N. 35-40 W. and dips 20 -25 SW. It has been traced about 40 feet along the strike at the base of the outcrop and for about 20 feet up the dip. Insufficient work was done to give an accurate idea of the size of the deposit or to determine if other autunite-bearing beds are present.
Aluminous Lateritic Soil of the Republic of Haiti, W.I.
From abstract: Aluminous lateritic soil containing as much as 50 percent of alumina (A120) Is found in several places in the Republic of Haiti. The largest deposits are on the Rochelois Plateau southwest of Miragoane on the Southern Peninsula. Mapping and drilling of the deposits indicate fifteen million long tons in place (dried basis). It is estimated that a minimum of 10 million long tons of this reserve is recoverable. The average chemical composition of this material is as follows: A1203, 46.8 percent; SiO2, 3.4 percent; T1O2, 2.8 percent; Fe20, 21.9 percent ; P206, 0.6 percent ; MnO5, 0.5 percent ; and loss on ignition, 24.1 percent. Other localities in which similar lateritic soil occurs are Beaumont in the Massif de la Hotte ; the vicinity of Savane Zombi in the Massif de la Selle ; and Savane Terre Rouge on the plateau northwest of Gonaives. In none of these regions were large deposits found.
Optical Calcite Deposits of the Republic of Mexico
From abstract: Many small deposits of optical calcite (Iceland spar) were discovered in the States of Chihuahua, Durango, Sonora, and Sinaloa from early in 1942 to late in 1944. Exploration that began in Sonora led to the discovery of commercial deposits in the eastern part of that State, and subsequently other deposits were found and mined in southwestern and northeastern Chihuahua and in western and central Durango. The largest deposits can be reached by foot or by horse in from 1 to 3 hours from the nearest truck roads, but some of the small deposits are 1 to 3 days by horse from the nearest roads.
Tungsten Investigations in the Republic of Argentina, 1942-43
From foreword: This is a progress report describing four tungsten mines in the Republic of Argentina that were examined between October 1942 and May 1943. The work leading to this report was carried on by the Geological Survey, United States Department of the Interior, and Direcci6n de Minas y Geologia, Ministerio de Agricultura de la Republica Argentina. This work was part of a larger cooperative program sponsored by the Interdepartmental Committee on Scientific and Cultural Cooperation and was carried on under the auspices of the United States Department of State. It is hoped that this cooperative work will be continued, for it is not only of direct practical use to miners but of high scientific interest.
Spirit Leveling in South Carolina: Part 2. Southern South Carolina, 1896-1938
From introduction: This bulletin, which is published in two parts, contains the complete results of all spirit leveling done in South Carolina by the Geological Survey of the United States Department of the Interior, including those heretofore published.' The 34th parallel of latitude, passing through Columbia, serves to divide the State into two sections, each of which is represented by one of the parts of the bulletin. Part 1 deals with the section lying north of the 34th parallel, designated as northern South Carolina, and part 2 deals with the section lying south of that parallel, designated as southern South Carolina. In each part descriptions of the points for which figures of elevation have been determined are listed according to the quadrangles in which the points occur, and the quadrangles are arranged in alphabetic order.
Mica-Bearing Pegmatites of New Hampshire: a Preliminary Report
From abstract: Mica has been mined in New Hampshire since 1803. Production from 1908 through 1939 has aggregated 13,326,990 pounds of sheet and punch mica, an annual average of 416,470 pounds. Since 1931 production has been below this average, because of economic conditions rather than depletions. The mica-bearing pegmatites of the Grafton and Keene districts occur mostly in sillimanite-mica schist adjacent to large areas of biotite gneiss. The pegmatite bodies range from a fraction of an inch to more than 200 feet in thickness; most of them are crosscutting, and about 75 percent strike northeast. Mica occurs sporadically in most of them but where present in commercial quantities it is localized in one or more of the following zones: (1) In quartz-plagioclase-muscovite zones 2 to 10 feet from the walls of large pegmatite bodies, (2) in or near quartz masses that occur mostly near the centers of the bodies, (3) in thin dikes 5 to 15 feet thick or in similar offshoots from larger bodies, (4) within large pegmatite bodies, in more or less tabular streaks or zones composed principally of plagioclase, quartz, and muscovite.
Geologic Structure and Occurrence of Gas in Part of Southwestern New York: Part 2. Subsurface Structure in Part of Southwestern New York and Mode of Occurrence of Gas in the Medina Group
Abstract: Based on the records of several hundred deep wells, contour maps have been prepared showing the monoclinal structure of part of western New York, and isopach lines have been drawn showing the westward convergence of the rocks. The mode of occurrence of natural gas in the Medina group is briefly discussed. The location of the gas fields has not been determined by structural traps, but rather stratigraphy and lithology are the controlling factors in trapping the gas, which occurs in porous lenses and streaks of sandstone sealed within impermeable beds. This mode of occurrences of the Medina gas makes the search for new fields in western New York more hazardous than in most natural gas regions. As structure has not formed traps for the gas there is no surface guide to favorable sites for testing, and new fields are found by haphazard drilling. It would be helpful, however, when wells are sunk, to study the lithology of the gas-bearing zone by an examination of the drill cuttings and core samples of the sand and to have electrical logs made of the wells to obtain measurements of permeability and porosity. Such tests may indicate the direction of greatest porosity in which the sand is more likely to contain gas.
Past Lode-Gold Production from Alaska
From abstract: This report presents an analysis of the statistical records of the Geological Survey regarding the production of lode gold from the Territory of Alaska for the period 1882 to 1937, inclusive. During that time lode gold to the value of $172,368,000 had been mined. The history of the discovery of lode gold and the early developments in lode-gold mining in each of the various districts is outlined briefly, and the production of lode gold in each of the geographic subdivisions is tabulated fully for each year, as far as the records and the practices of the Geological Survey permit.
Subsurface Geology and Oil and Gas Resources of Osage County, Oklahoma: Part 11. Summary of Subsurface Geology with Special Reference to Oil and Gas
From foreword: This report on the subsurface geology of Osage County, Okla., describes the structual features, the character of the oil- and gas-producing beds, and the localities where additional oil and gas may be found. It embodies a part of the results of a subsurface geologic investigation of the Osage Indian Reservation, which coincides in area with Osage County. The investigation was conducted by a field party of the Geological Survey of the United States Department of the Interior from 1934 to 1937 and involved the study of the records of about 17,000 wells that have been drilled in Osage County.
Occurrences of Molybdenum Minerals in Alaska
Abstract: In the accompanying report reference is made to all of the deposits in Alaska in which molybdenum minerals have been definitely recognized and reported. None of the deposits have been mined commercially, and none of them have been prospected thoroughly enough to afford quantitative estimates as to their tenor and potential reserves ; in fact, at only a few of the localities has there been more than surficial testing. Forty-one separate and distinct localities where molybdenum minerals occur are listed, and the available information on factors of geologic significance regarding each occurrence is given. A small-scale map of Alaska on which the various localities are indicated forms part of the bulletin, and in the text are extensive references to the various published reports and records of the Survey upon which the statements are based. In spite of the widespread distribution of molybdenum mineralization in Alaska, the remoteness of many of the localities, their handicap through dearth of transportation facilities and labor supplies, and the already wellsupplied condition of the American market for molybdenum ores discourage the early development of any of the known deposits or search for them in unsurveyed areas. These draw-backs will doubtless become -less important factors as the settlement and development of Alaska as a whole takes place. It is, therefore, with a view to the future that one must consider these deposits, and from that standpoint it becomes evident that some of them merit watchful consideration.
The Tin-Spodumene Belt of the Carolinas: a Preliminary Report
From abstract: Cassiterite and spodumene, of possible economic importance, occur in a belt, 24.5 miles long and 1.8 miles in maximum width, extending southwestward from Lincolnton to Grover, N. C. This belt is in the Piedmont province, an upland with an average altitude of 1,000 feet, and is readily accessible by rail and highway. The region is underlain by crystalline limestone, quartzite, schists, gneisses, and granite. The rocks strike northeast and, in most of the belt, dip steeply northwest. Most of them are deeply weathered.
Nickel-Copper Deposits on the West Coast of Chichagof Island, Alaska
From abstract: On the west coast of Chichagof Island, southeastern Alaska, are three nickel-copper deposits that consist of norite containing the sulfide minerals pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite. The deposits are within less than a mile of each other and are, by water, 160 miles southwest of Juneau and 70 miles northwest of Sitka. The norite is part of a stock, about 5 square miles of which is above sea level. Other rocks of the stock are amphibolite, amphibolitic norite, gabbro, diorite, quartz diorite, monzonite, granite, pegmatites, quartz veins, and schist inclusions. The stock is intrusive into a Lower Cretaceous (?) graywacke formation and an Upper Triassic (?) greenstone formation, both of which are now metamorphosed to schist.
Tin Deposits of Northern Lander County, Nevada
From abstract: Tin-bearing veinlets are exposed in a small area near Izenhood Ranch, 22 miles north of Battle Mountain, Nev. They occur in thick rhyolitic flows of Miocene (?) age, and wood tin, found in the gravels of arroyos that head in the surrounding rhyolite, presumably comes from -other veinlets not yet discovered. The exposed veinlets are about 20 feet in maximum length and a quarter of an inch in average thickness. Parallel and reticulating veinlets form lodes 4 to 6 feet thick and 15 or 20 feet long. Virtually no cassiterite is disseminated in the wall rock.
Manganiferous and Ferruginous Chert in Perry and Lewis Counties, Tennessee
From abstract: Perry and Lewis Counties, east of the Tennessee River, in west-middle Tennessee, are underlain by nearly flat-lying rocks of Paleozoic age, with Mississippian cherty limestones forming the greater part of the surface of the western Highland Rim Plateau ridges. Near the summits of the ridges there is a fairly definite horizon in the chert that contains manganese and iron oxides in varying degrees of concentration. Weathering of the mineralized chert has produced widespread float on the hill slopes and in the beds of small spring branches, and the presence of this float, some of it rich enough for metallurgical manganese ore, has encouraged a search for promising deposits in place. In the present study 52 localities where the mineralized beds crop out or have been prospected were examined.
Geology of the Portage Pass Area, Alaska
Abstract: The Portage Pass area is in south-central Alaska, and includes part of the narrow neck of land that joins the Kenai Peninsula with the mainland to the north. This region is in general mountainous, elevations ranging from sea level to more than 4,000 feet on the peaks bordering the area. Several glaciers, all of which are apparently receding, extend into the area. Vegetation, chiefly alder and cottonwood on the valley lowlands and some spruce and hemlock on the lower slopes, extends to an elevation of about 1,000 feet, above which the slopes are bare except for occasional clumps of brush. The bedrock of the entire area is slate, argillite, and graywacke, apparently part of the same great series that extends from the Kenai Peninsula into the Prince William Sound region and is at least in part of Cretaceous age. The only igneous rocks recognized in the area are a few acidic dikes and a small diabase dike. Small, irregular quartz veinlets are widespread. The structure is not only complex but, owing to extensive metamorphism, is in many places obscure. A general northeast strike and steep to vertical dips of both bedding and cleavage planes are the rule, but there appears to be some broad folding along steeply northeast-pitching axes. Although no large faults have been recognized, much movement has occurred along many small faults, shear zones, and bedding planes. All observed faults and shear zones trend northeastward. There are no mines in this area. Some mineralization of quartz veins was noted at a few places, and some prospecting has been done, but no workable deposits are known.
Some Quicksilver Prospects in Adjacent Parts of Nevada, California, and Oregon
Abstract: This report summarizes the results of reconnaissance study of quicksilver deposits in the northwestern corner of Nevada, the northeastern corner of California, and Lake County, Oreg. made in August 1940. The Lene Pine district, Nevada, the Silvertown and Red Hawk properties in California, and the Currier and Glass Butte properties in Oregon were included. The first two of these require further development before a definite opinion as to their value can be formed. The Red Hawk mine has yielded high-grade ore, but the ore bodies so far worked are very small and scattered. The small amount of development at the recently opened Currier mine has yielded encouraging results. The deposits in the Glass Buttes are large but of such low grade that thorough sampling would be needed to determine their value. In general the region appears to warrant more attention from quicksilver prospectors than it has yet received.
Nickel-Copper Deposit at Snipe Bay, Baranof Island, Alaska
Abstract: At Snipe Bay, on the outer coast of Baranof Island, about 46 miles southeast of Sitka in southeastern Alaska, is a nickelcopper deposit that consists of a mass of basic rock intruded into quartzite and quartz schist. Neither the size nor the grade of the deposit is adequately known. Natural exposures and those in a few prospect openings indicate that to an assumed depth of about 130 feet below the lowest point on the outcrop there is a reserve of about 430,000 tons of low-grade nickelbearing material, which, to judge from available assays and from comparison with similar material from other places, probably does not contain more than 0.3 percent each of nickel and copper. The deposit thus appears too small and of too low grade to permit the recovery of the nickel and copper except at a considerable financial loss; but as the location is favorable for largescale, low-cost development, further prospecting may be justified, in the hope that a moderate amount of surface stripping, plus a few diamond-drill holes, might indicate that the deposit is larger, and possibly of higher grade, than it is safe to infer from the available data.
Antimony Deposits of the Stampede Creek Area, Kantishna District, Alaska
From abstract: The Stampede Creek area lies about 120 miles southwest of Fairbanks, Alaska. It is most readily accessible by air during the summer and by tractor road during the winter. Since 1936 approximately 2,400 tons of shipping-grade antimony ore and concentrates, containing about 1,300 tons of metallic antimony, have been produced at the Stampede mine. The mine was closed down in the spring of 1941, principally because of the high cost of transportation. The area is underlain largely by metamorphosed rocks of the Birch Creek schist. The schist has been warped and crumpled into many broad, open folds which strike northeast and also plunge to the northeast. The Stampede mine is in the schistose quartzite member of the Birch Creek schist.
Nickel-Copper Deposit at Funter Bay, Admiralty Island, Alaska
From abstract: The nickel-copper deposit near the north end of Admiralty Island, about 18 miles in an airline west of Juneau, in southeastern Alaska, consists of a basic sill which averages somewhat more than 100 feet in thickness. The sill, which dips eastward, is intrusive into a thick sequence of phyllite and various types of schist. The rock of the sill consists principally of the silicate minerals labradorite and olivine, but it also contains magnetite and the sulfides pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite. It assays, on the average, about 0.34 percent nickel and 0.35 copper, which are doubtless mostly in the pentlandite and chalcopyrite respectively but are probably constituents of other minerals also. A significant proportion of nickel and copper is probably contained in the olivine and perhaps in the pyrrhotite.
Vanadium Deposits of Colorado and Utah: a Preliminary Report
From abstract: Deposits of vanadium-bearing sandstone are widely distributed in western Colorado and eastern Utah and have been the principal domestic source of vanadium, uranium, and radium. Except during a few years when operations were relatively small, deposits at one or more places in this region have been intensively mined since 1909. Production has increased considerably each year since 1937.
Manganese Deposits in the Artillery Mountains Region, Mohave County, Arizona
From abstract: The manganese deposits of the Artillery Mountains region lie within an area of about 25 square miles between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, on the west side of the Bill Williams River in west-central Arizona. The richest croppings are on the northeast side of this area, among the foothills of the Artillery Mountains. They are 6 to 10 miles from Alamo. The nearest shipping points are Congress, about 50 miles to the east, and Aguila, about 50 miles to the southeast. The principal manganese deposits are part of a sequence of alluvial fan and playa material, probably of early Pliocene age, which were laid down in a fault basin. They are overlain by later Pliocene (?) basalt flows and sediments and by Quaternary basalt and alluvium. The Pliocene (?) rocks are folded into a shallow composite syncline that occupies the valley between the Artillery and Rawhide Mountains, and the folded rocks along either side of the valley, together with the overlying Quaternary basalt, are broken by faults that have produced a group of horsts, grabens, and step-fault blocks.
The Coso Quicksilver District, Inyo County, California
From abstract: The Coso quicksilver district, which is in the Coso Range, Inyo County, Calif., produced 231 flasks of quicksilver between 1935 and 1939. The quicksilver mineral, cinnabar, was not recognized in the district until 1929, although the hot springs near the deposits have been known since about 1875...The granitic rock on which much of the sinter rests is considerably altered. The cinnabar was deposited as films and grains in open spaces in the sinter, during one stage in a sequence of hot spring activities that still continues. The amount of sinter in the district is estimated to be about 1,800,000 tons. Although the greater part of this does not contain much cinnabar, the total quantity of such material is large enough to be of interest as a low-grade ore.
Tin Deposits of Irish Creek, Virginia
From abstract: Cassiterite was discovered along Irish Creek in the Blue Ridge in the northern part of Rockbridge County, Va., in 1846, but active prospecting and development work were not begun until 1884. The production has been small, probably less than 1,000 tons of ore, and has come chiefly from workings on Panther Run, a small tributary near the headwaters of Irish Creek.
Manganese Deposits of Mexico
From abstract: Manganese has been reported from 335 deposits in 20 of the 30 States and Territories of Mexico. The production of manganese ore prior to 1942, according to published figures, amounted to about 54,000 tons. For the year 1942 production rose to 35,000 tons, for 1943 to 70,503 tons, and for 1944 to 80,671 tons; but for 1945 it dropped to a little less than 52,000 tons, and during 1946 it continued to drop. Up to the end of 1941 Chihuahua had produced about half the manganese ore from Mexico; San Luis Potosi produced about 17 percent, and Baja California and Zacatecas each about 10 percent. In 1942 Baja California became the chief producer; Durango, Chihuahua, and Zacatecas each yielded somewhat less. During that year the ore came from 76 deposits, of which only 30 yielded more than 500 tons each.
The Three Kids Manganese District, Clark County, Nevada
Abstract: The Three Kids manganese district, in Clark County, Nev., has produced between 15,000 and 20,000 tons of ore, which contained between 30 and 40 percent manganese, 1.5 percent iron, and 12 percent silica. It is estimated that the reserves in the district aggregate about 5,500,000 tons of ore averaging about 10 percent manganese. Of this amount about 800,000 tons contains more than 20 percent manganese and 4,700,000 tons contains from 5 to 20 percent manganese. The manganese ore is a sedimentary deposit and consists of wad interbedded with lake or playa sediments belonging to the Muddy Creek formation of Pliocene (?) age. Where the manganese content is as high as 30 percent, the wad forms thick massive beds separated by thin almost barren partings. Where the content is low, the wad forms very thin lenses or small irregular blebs scattered through sandstone, or a cement for the sand grains. The zone of manganiferous beds ranges from about 10 to 75 feet in aggregate thickness, but at most places the thickness is between 25 and 40 feet.
Shorter Contributions to General Geology, 1936
From abstract: This report describes four species of Ostreidae from the Upper Cretaceous of the Gulf region. The zones that the species characterize lie either in the upper part of the Austin chalk or in beds of upper Austin age.
Geology and Ore Deposits of the Libby Quadrangle, Montana
From introduction: This report details the results of a geological survey of the Libby Quadrangle, Montana.
Geology and Biology of North Atlantic Deep-Sea Cores Between Newfoundland and Ireland
Summary: In May and June 1936 Dr. C. S. Piggot of the Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, took a series of 11 deep-sea cores in the North Atlantic Ocean between the Newfoundland banks and the banks off the Irish coast.
Shorter Contributions to General Geology, 1941-42
Preface: The author of this paper gives a thorough description of a complex of very unusual igneous rocks and associated hydrothermal deposits.
Brookhaven National Laboratory Scientific Progress Report: April 1, 1947
From introduction: The fundamental purpose of the laboratory is to provide research and training facilities in nuclear and related studies which are not possible for the individual University.