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Geology and Ore Deposits of the Goodsprings Quadrangle, Nevada
This is a report on the geology and ore deposits of the Goodsprings Quadrangle, Nevada.
The Significance of Geologic Conditions in Naval Petroleum Reserves No. 3, Wyoming
From Introduction: The work on which this report is based consisted of detailed field and office studies which occupied the greater part of the summer of 1927. During this period mapping was done with plane table and telescopic alidade on a scale of 1 inch to 1,000 feet, and wells, faults, and outcrops within the productive part of the Teapot field were located in detail.
The Kaiparowits Region: A Geographic and Geologic Reconnaissance of Part of Utah and Arizona
From introduction: The purposes of this exploration are to determine routes, to locate water holes, and to select areas where detailed geologic study could profitably be undertaken.
Geology of the Kettleman Hills Oil Field, California: Stratigraphy, Paleontology, and Structure
From Introduction: The field work that furnished the basis for this report was begun in 1930 and was continued at intervals until 1934. The anticlinal character of the Kettleman Hills is apparent to even the casual observer, but the many structural complications due to an intricate network of minor faults, at least in North Dome and Middle Dome, are much less obvious. Though it is improbable that these faults have any relation to the occurrence of oil, an attempt was made to map them, not only to represent the structure adequately but also because the stratigraphy could not be understood if they were neglected. Faunal zones were particularly useful in mapping. On the other hand, some lithologic units proved to be more persistent than had been expected. The two sets of features-fossils and lithology-served as checks on each other.
Mollusca From the Miocene and Lower Pliocene of Virginia and North Carolina: Part 2. Scaphopoda and Gastropoda
Introduction: Part 2 of the Systematic Report continues and concludes the study of the Mollusca from the Miocene and lower Pliocene of Virginia and North Carolina. One hundred and nineteen species, only a fraction of the known fauna, are reviewed and 66 additional species are described and figured. (See faunal chart, pp. 180-183.) The report upon the gastropods suffers from the same shortcomings obvious in the work on the pelecypods. Most of the material is from old collections made before the importance of the exact placing of the fossil locality both areally and vertically was recognized. Many of the citations of outcrops are vague and the sections generalized. Detailed field studies, particularly on the zoning of the Yorktown formation in southern Virginia and northern North Carolina, were begun later by Wendell P. Mansfield, but he died in the summer of 1939 before the completion of the work.
Reconnaissance Geology Between Lake Mead and Davis Dam, Arizona-Nevada
From introduction: The present study was undertaken to extend and supplement a mapping program covering several ranges north and northwest of Lake Mead.
Mollusca From the Miocene and Lower Pliocene of Virginia and North Carolina: Part 1. Pelecypoda
Abstract: A brief sketch of the stratigraphy of the Miocene of Virginia and the Miocene and Pliocene of North Carolina was prepared by Dr. W. C. Mansfield before his death in July 1939. His purpose was "to provide a background of formational nomenclature" for the taxonomic treatment of the molluscan faunas. The physical nature and distribution of the upper Tertiary formations within those States are discussed, characteristic sections given, and diagnostic molluscan species listed. Part 1 of the systematic report covers the Pelecypoda. A monographic treatment is not attempted, but 132 previously known species are considered, and 62 new species and subspecies are described and figured.
Geology and Ore Deposits of the Park City District, Utah
From purpose of this investigation: investigation.-The investigation of the geology of Long Island was undertaken in connection with a study of the underground waters of the island made by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Commission on Additional Water Supply of New York City. During the progress of the work many new geologic facts were developed, some of which demanded extensive modifications of the views previously held as to the structure and geologic history of the island.
The Middle Triassic Marine Invertebrate Faunas of North America
This is a report on the middle triassic marine invertebrate faunas of North America.
The Copper Deposits of Ray and Miami, Arizona
This is a report on the copper deposits of Ray and Miami, Arizona.
The Sunset-Midway Oil Field, California: Part 1. Geology and Oil Resources
This is a report on the Sunset-Midway oil field in Kern County, California, including the geology and production of oil.
Geologic History of the Yosemite Valley
The principal result of the investigations upon which this report is based is the determination within narrow limits of the preglacial depth of the Yosemite Valley and of other facts concerning its preglacial development which permit fairly definite estimates of the proportionate shares of work performed by stream and by glacier. The investigations comprise a detailed survey of the glacial and geomorphologic features of the Yosemite region and an equally intensive study of its rock formations, supplemented by reconnaissance work of both kinds in adjoining parts of the Sierra Nevada.
Geologic History of the Yosemite Valley
The principal result of the investigations upon which this report is based is the determination within narrow limits of the preglacial depth of the Yosemite Valley and of other facts concerning its preglacial development which permit fairly definite estimates of the proportionate shares of work performed by stream and by glacier. The investigations comprise a detailed survey of the glacial and geomorphologic features of the Yosemite region and an equally intensive study of its rock formations, supplemented by reconnaissance work of both kinds in adjoining parts of the Sierra Nevada.
Foraminifera From the Northern Olympic Peninsula, Washington
From introduction: This report deals with the stratigraphic and ecologic significance of Foraminifera contained in a Tertiary sequence that crops out in the northern part of the Olympic Peninsula, Wash. (pl. 1). The work was done as a part of a program of geologic investigations for oil and gas possibilities conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey.
Stratigraphy of Outcropping Permian Rocks in Parts of Northeastern Arizona and Adjacent Areas
From introduction: In the spring and early summer of 1950 the writers undertook an investigation of the outcropping Permian rocks in northeastern Arizona, northwestern New Mexico, and parts of southern Utah. This work had as its specific objective the establishing of correlations of Permian rocks in the Zuni uplift, Defiance uplift, and Monument Valley upwarp. The determination of these relations, it is believed, will be of aid in the current activities of the Geological Survey in the Navajo Reservation which have as objectives the investigation of the mineral fuels and water resources of the area.
Yampa Canyon in the Uinta Mountains Colorado
From purpose of the report: A detailed office study of modern topographic and geologic maps and aerial photographs of Yampa Canyon and its environs in the Uinta Mountains.
The Bannock Thrust Zone Southeastern Idaho
Abstract: The Bannock overthrust in southeastern Idaho and northcentral Utah was originally described by Richards and Mansfield (1912) as a single large thrust fault that formed at the close of the Laramide orogeny and was folded by renewed compression near the end of Pliocene time. Later Mansfield expanded and revised his interpretation of the Bannock overthrust so that at least the northern part of the overthrust was thought to be a thrust zone in which the individual faults originated in a folded sole thrust. Detailed mapping in areas critical to Richards and Mansfield's interpretations has shown that the faults thought by them to be parts of one large thrust are separate faults, and that, although some of the thrust surfaces are curved, they were not folded in Pliocene time but probably were folded during a late stage of the thrusting. Extensions of the Bannock thrust to the north, south, east, and west based upon extrapolation of a single large folded thrust surface are not warranted. The Bannock overthrust is reinterpreted as a westward-dipping imbricate thrust zone possibly several tens of miles wide extending at least from southwestern Montana to north-central Utah. It is recommended that the name "Bannock overthrust" no longer be used, and that this zone of imbricate thrusts in the southeast corner of Idaho be called the Bannock thrust zone. The thrusts range in age from Late Jurassic to post- Early Cretaceous and are progressively younger from west to east; strong regional compressive forces do not appear to have been active in the area as late as Pliocene time. The upper plates of the thrusts moved to the northeast in response to an unknown force. Steep eastward-trending tear faults formed during thrusting probably in response to differential movement among the eastward-moving thrust plates. In Tertiary and Quaternary time ...
Geology of the Guadalupe Mountains, New Mexico
From introduction: The present investigation is an attempt, by means of detailed areal mapping, to resolve the relations of the shelf-rock units to one another and to the reef and basin rocks and to clarify the confusing stratigraphic nomenclature.
Geology of the Hot Sulphur Springs quadrangle, Grand County, Colorado
Scope and Purpose of Work: The quadrangle was mapped as part of the U.S. Geological Survey program of classifying and evaluating lands in the Public Domain. Mineral rights for coal had been retained in parts or all of Tps. 2 and 3 N., Rs. 77, 78, and 79 W. These areas are in part underlain by sedimentary rocks of Late Cretaceous(?) and early Tertiary age (Middle Park Formation), and in North Park these rocks are called the Coalmont Formation and contain coal. The chief purpose of the work was to map and study any coal beds found and to make a detailed geologic map that can be used as part of a geological atlas of the United States.
A Descriptive Catalog of Selected Aerial Photographs of Geologic Features in the United States
From introduction: The U.S. Geological Survey has selected and assembled sets of photographs that illustrate numerous types of geologic features in the United States. This catalog lists these special sets of photographs that are available for purchase and describes the features illustrated. One reduced photograph from each set is shown on the back pages of this catalog to assist the purchaser in his selection.
A Descriptive Catalog of Selected Aerial Photographs of Geologic Features in Areas Outside the United States
From introduction: The U.S. Geological Survey has selected and assembled 67 sets of aerial photographs that illustrate a variety of geologic features in Antarctica, South and Central America, the southwest Pacific, Iran, Japan, the Arabian Peninsula, Pakistan, and mainland China. Contact prints of the photographs composing these sets are available for purchase. Sets of photographs of geologic features in the United States and Puerto Rico are listed in a separate catalog (Denny, C. S., and others, 1968, A descriptive catalog of selected aerial photographs of geologic features in the United States: U.S. Geol. Survey Prof. Paper 590).
Stratigraphy of the Star Peak Group (Triassic) and Overlying Lower Mesozoic Rocks: Humboldt Range, Nevada
This is a report on the stratigraphy of the Star Peak Group an overlying lower Mesozoic rocks Humboldt Range in Nevada.
Water-Quality Effects on Baker Lake of Recent Volcanic Activity at Mount Baker, Washington
From introduction: The purpose of this report is to evaluate and describe relationships between the volcanic activity on Mount Baker and the possible impacts on Baker Lake water.
Postglacial Volcanic Deposits at Mount Baker, Washington, and Potential Hazards From Future Eruptions
Abstract: Eruptions and other geologic events at Mount Baker during the last 10,000 years have repeatedly affected adjacent areas, especially the valleys that head on the south and east sides of the volcano. Small volumes of tephra were erupted at least four times during the past 10,000 years. Future eruptions like these could cause as much as 35 centimeters of tephra to be deposited at sites 17 kilometers from the volcano, 15 centimeters of tephra to be deposited 29 kilometers from the volcano, and 5 centimeters, 44 kilometers from the volcano. Lava flows were erupted at least twice during the last 10,000 years and moved down two valleys. Future lava flows will not directly endanger people because lava typically moves so slowly that escape is possible. Hot pyroclastic flows evidently occurred during only one period and were confined to the Boulder Creek valley. Such flows can move at speeds of as much as 150 kilometers per hour and can bury valley floors under tens of meters of hot rock debris for at least 15 kilometers from the volcano. Large mudflows, most of which contain hydrothermally altered rock debris, originated at Mount Baker at least eight times during the last 10,000 years. The largest mudflow reached 29 kilometers or more down the valley of the Middle Fork Nooksack River, west of the volcano, about 6,000 years ago. Extensive masses of hydrothermally altered rock that are potentially unstable exist today near the summit of the volcano, especially in the Sherman Crater-Sherman Peak area. Avalanches of this material could be triggered by stream explosions, earthquakes, or eruptions, or may occur because of slow-acting forces or processes that gradually decrease stability. Large avalanches could move downslope at high speed and could grade downvalley into mudflows. Floods caused by rapid melting of snow and ice ...
Geologic Studies, Project Gnome, Eddy County, New Mexico
From abstract: For Project Gnome, part of the Plowshare Program to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy, a nuclear device was detonated December 10, 1961, underground in rack salt of the Permian Salado Formation southeast of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Geological Survey's investigations on behalf of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission provided basic geologic and geophysical information needed to define preshot and postshot geologic and hydrologic conditions at and near the site. This report describes the geology of the site, some physical and chemical properties of the rocks, and the known effects of the nuclear detonation on the rocks of the site.
Aerial Gamma-Ray and Magnetic Survey of the Red River Area - Block C, Texas and Oklahoma: Final Report, Volume 2, Dallas
This report contains aerial gamma-ray and magnetic survey maps of the Red River Area in the Dallas Quadrangle.
Aerial Gamma-Ray and Magnetic Survey of the Red River Area - Block C, Texas and Oklahoma: Final Report, Volume 2, Sherman
This report contains aerial gamma-ray and magnetic survey maps of the Red River Area, Sherman Quadrangle.
Aerial Gamma-Ray and Magnetic Survey of the Delta Area, Utah: Final Report, Volume 2, Delta
This is a report on aerial gamma-ray and magnetic survey of the Delta area of Utah.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey of the Clinton National Topographic Map, Ni 14-2 Oklahoma: Volume 2
This report contains aerial radiometric and magnetic survey for the Clinton National Topographic map, Oklahoma.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey of the Lawton National Topographic Map, Ni 14-5, Texas and Oklahoma, Volume 2
This report contains aerial radiometric and magnetic survey for Lawton National Topographic Map, Texas and Oklahoma.
Aerial radiometric and magnetic survey Tularosa national topographic map, New Mexico, Volume 2
This report contains aerial radiometric and magnetic survey data for Tularosa National Topographic Map of New Mexico.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey Winnemucca National Topographic Map, Nevada, Volume 2
No Description Available.
Aerial Gamma Ray and Magnetic Survey, Raton Basin Project, Flagstaff Quadrangle of Arizona: Final Report, Volume 2
This report contains aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey for Raton Basin Project in the Flagstaff Quadrangle, Arizona.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona, Idaho, Montana, New Mexico, South Dakota and Washington: Final Report, Volume 1. Instrumentation and Methods
From abstract: The objective of the work was to define areas showing surface indications of a generally higher uranium content where detailed exploration for uranium would most likely be successful.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Survey: Tonopah National Topographic Map, Nevada, Volume 2
This is a report on the aerial radiometric and magnetic survey, Tonopah National topographic map, Nevada.
Aerial Gamma Ray and Magnetic Survey, Raton Basin Project, Albuquerque Quadrangle: Final Report, Volume 2
This is a report on aerial gamma ray and magnetic survey, Raton Basin Project, in the Albuquerque Quadrangle, New Mexico.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-A, Mesa Quadrangle
This is a report on aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Mesa Quadrangle.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-B, Clifton Quadrangle
This is a report on aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Clifton Quadrangle.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-C, Tucson Quadrangle
This is a report on aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Tucson Quadrangle.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-D, Silver City Quadrangle
This is a report on aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Silver City Quadrangle.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-E, Nogales Quadrangle
This is a report on the aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Nogales Quadrangle.
Aerial Radiometric and Magnetic Reconnaissance Survey of Portions of Arizona--New Mexico: Volume 2-F, Douglas Quadrangle
This is a report on aerial radiometric and magnetic reconnaissance survey of portions of Arizona and New Mexico in the Douglas Quadrangle.
Gold Quartz Veins of the Alleghany District, California
From Outline of the Report: The Alleghany district, in the southern part of Sierra County, Calif., has long been famous for the high-grade gold ore of its quartz veins. The oldest rocks of the district (pp. 6-17) are of sedimentary and volcanic origin and correspond to part of the Calaveras formation as mapped in the Colfax and Downieville folios of the Geologic Atlas of the United States. These rocks are divided into five formations, of which three-the Blue Canyon, Relief, and Cape Horn formations follow the definitions laid down by Lindgren in the Colfax folio, and two-the Tightner and Kanaka formations-are new units required by the more detailed nature of the present study. It is thought possible that a conglomerate which forms the basal part of the Kanaka formation is of glacial origin. Intrusions of gabbro and more basic rocks, the latter now completely serpentinized, crop out over nearly half the area in which pre-Tertiary rocks are exposed. Small granitic dikes of later age than the basic intrusives are found in the western part of the district. Overlying and largely concealing the older rocks are auriferous gravel of Eocene and Miocene age, andesitic breccia of probable Miocen age, basalt flows of probable Pleistocene age, and minor amounts of Pleistocene and Recent gravel.
Physiography and Glacial Geology of Eastern Montana and Adjacent Areas
This is a report on the physiography and glacial geology of eastern Montana and adjacent areas.
Miocene Foraminifera of the Coastal Plain of the Eastern United States
From introduction: In the following report the species of Foraminifera found in the Miocene of the Coastal Plain region of the eastern United States from Florida to Maryland are described and recorded. Numerous papers have been published on this region, some of which, however, are largely lists. Where the original material on which a paper was based has not been available for the present study, the records have been omitted, as it is very difficult to place the species in their proper position without seeing the actual specimens.
Origin of the Anhydrite Cap Rock of American Salt Domes
From abstract: The thesis of this paper is that the anhydrite cap rock of salt domes originated by the residual accumulation and consolidation, on top of a salt stock, of sedimentary anhydrite freed from the salt by solution of the top of the stock. This hypothesis is compared with that of origin from a bed of sedimentary anhydrite supposed to have overlain the salt of the salt stock in depth and to have been forced up on top of the stock as it rose. The strongest basis for the hypothesis of residual accumulation is the presence, between the anhydrite cap rock and the top of the salt stock on many salt domes, of a flat solution surface, the "salt table," decapitating anhydrite-bearing folds in the salt. The paper considers other general geologic evidence and internal petrographic evidence with a view to ascertaining to what extent they confirm or at least fit this interpretation.
The Geology and Ore Deposits of Goldfield, Nevada
This report describes the geology and ore deposits of Goldfield, Nevada.
Geology and Ore Deposits of the Park City District, Utah
From introduction: This survey was the first systematic work undertaken in this geologic province since the Geological Exploration of the Fortieth Parallel, in 1869, and was the first detailed geologic examination of a wide area in the Wasatch Range. Hence, an unusual amount of general geologic work in the region surrounding the special field was required to establish fundamental geologic facts.
Tabulation or Ore Reserves and Past Production for the Uranium-Vanadium Region of Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona
The tabulations on these pages include all of the known areas in Colorado, Utah, New Mexico, and Arizona having economically important uranium-vanadium deposits of the type which are generally referred to by the terms roscoe-lite and/or carnotite. Though similar deposits are known to exist in other areas they are to be viewed as being little more than mineralogical curiosities.
Geology and Uranium Deposits of the Carrizo Mountains Area Apache County, Arizona and San Juan County, New Mexico
Although uranium gas first discovered in the Carrizo Mountains area in 1918, the ores were not developed until 1942. They have, however, been mined continuously since that time. Formations in the area range from the Pernian Cutler through the Cretaceous Mancos shale, and all are intruded by a dioritic laccolith and its related dikes. The older structures, which include the Defiance Uplift, the San Juan Basin, and the Four Corners Platform are somewhat disrupted by the effects of the intrusion. A number of mines are described and mineralogical and geochemical studies made are outlined. The primary uranium mineral is unknown, but the chief uranium ore-mineral is the secondary mineral, tyuyamunite. It is concluded that there is at least minor structural control of the ore bodies along sedimentary trends and joints, and that all ore bodies of 500 tons or more are on the Defiance monocline or its extensions. The uranium may have been syngenetic in the sediments, and redistributed by solutions or, more likely, that it rose vertically in hydrothermal solutions from the local intrusive bodies.